LOTE Arabic


Year-Reception(FOUNDATION)

Overview

Reception students are introduced to Arabic Letters and numbers from 1-10 early in the year. They are then taught how to pronounce and write each Arabic letter correctly and identify simple words beginning with the letter being learned in real life. Once this understanding is established, students are taught to form simple sentences using verbs that relate to the actions they carry out in real life.

Lesson Structure

Arabic lessons typically start with the Islamic greeting, oral interactions asking the students about their day and a revision of the Arabic alphabet rhyme. Students are then introduced to a new letter, taught how to pronounce it and write it correctly and then they practice what they have learned in their text books. Letters and words that are taught are constantly reiterated through rhymes that students can remember.

Scope and Sequence

The Arabic scope and sequence in the lower years lies in familiarizing students with the Arabic names of everyday objects and actions in their daily lives, in order to allow them to use these words in the correct context.

Reception Arabic scope and sequence
Term 1 Term 2 Term 3 Term 4
Fruits & vegetables Fruits & vegetables Numbers Farm animals

Assessment

In Arabic, students are assessed anecdotally whilst actively participating in activities and through their identification and pronunciation of the Arabic letters and their ability to write and use them independently.

Resources

Arabic Resources include:

  • Arabic in Kindergarten Textbook Level Pre-K2
  • Easyword Arabic Handwriting Book 1
  • Interactive White Board
  • Posters
  • Flashcards, Games and Hands on activities

Benchmarks and Recommendations

In Reception, the emphasis lies in students becoming confident with the Arabic alphabet and the numerals from 1 to 10 as well as identifying these in context. The support of parents by motivating students and assisting them with these goals is recommended. From Term 2, students in Prep begin to complete homework for Arabic, which attempts to reinforce letter recognition and simple words at home.

 

Year 1

Overview

Year 1 students are introduced to Arabic Letters and numbers from 1-20 early in the year. They are then reminded and taught how to pronounce and write each Arabic letter correctly and identify simple words beginning with the letter being focused on. Once this understanding is established, students are taught to form simple sentences using verbs that relate to the actions they carry out in real life.

Lesson Structure

Arabic lessons typically start with the Islamic greeting, oral interactions asking the students about their day and a revision of the Arabic alphabet rhyme. Students are then introduced to a new letter, taught how to pronounce it and write it correctly and then they practice what they have learned in their text books. Letters and words that are taught are constantly reiterated through rhymes that students can remember.

Scope and Sequence

The Arabic scope and sequence in the lower years lies in familiarizing students with the Arabic names of everyday objects and actions in their daily lives, in order to allow them to use these words in the correct context.

Year 1 Arabic scope and sequence
Term 1 Term 2 Term 3 Term 4
Body parts My family Colours & numbers Zoo animals

Assessment

In Arabic, students are assessed anecdotally whilst actively participating in activities and through their identification and pronunciation of the Arabic letters and their ability to write and use them independently.

Resources

Arabic Resources include:

  • Arabic in Kindergarten Textbook Level Pre-K3
  • Arabic in Kindergarten Workbook Level Pre-K3
  • Interactive White Board
  • Posters, Flashcards, Games and Hands on activities

Benchmarks and Recommendations

In Year1, the emphasis lies in students becoming confident with the Arabic alphabet and the numerals from 1 to 20 as well as identifying these in context. The support of parents by motivating students and assisting them with these goals is recommended. From Term 1, students in Year1 begin to complete homework for Arabic, which attempts to reinforce letter recognition and simple words at home.

 

 

 

Year 2

Overview

Year 2, students are expected to be able to form simple sentences to communicate purposefully about events like the weather. Early in the year, numbers from 1-20 are revised. Students are reminded and taught how to pronounce and write each Arabic letter correctly and identify simple words beginning with the letter being focused on. Once this understanding is established, students are encouraged to use more Arabic commands and sentences during class. They also learn about long vowel and short vowel sounds.

Lesson Structure

Arabic lessons typically start with Islamic greeting, oral discussions about students’ day, the day name and the weather, followed by quick revision of the previously learnt materials. Students then use textbook I Learn Arabic Multi Languages Textbook Level 1 for reading and I learn Arabic Multi Languages Workbook Level 1 for writing activities. Students are also given the opportunity to take home small short Arabic stories to read.

Scope and Sequence

The Arabic scope and sequence in the lower years lies in familiarizing students with the Arabic names of everyday objects and actions in their daily lives, in order to allow them to use these words in the correct context.

Year 2 Arabic scope and sequence
Term 1 Term 2 Term 3 Term 4
My home My family My School My friend

Assessment

In Arabic, students are assessed anecdotally whilst actively participating in activities and through their identification and pronunciation of the Arabic letters and their ability to write and use them independently.

Resources

Arabic Resources include:

  • I Learn Arabic Textbook Level 1
  • I Learn Arabic Workbook Level 1
  • Interactive White Board
  • Posters, Flashcards, Games and Hands on activities

Benchmarks and Recommendations

By the end of Grade 2, students learning Arabic are expected to be able to, identify and read words with correct pronunciation, form and spell familiar words correctly and show neat handwriting consistently.

 

 

Year 3

Overview

In Year 3, students will build on their previous knowledge of letters to differentiate between selfish letters and learn how to join them to make more complex words /sentence in Arabic. Students learn to describe the status of the weather in one or two words. Students are encouraged to use more Arabic commands and sentences during class. They continue to learn about long and short vowels, joining letters, forming simple sentences and using simple grammar in their oral language.

Lesson Structure

Arabic lessons typically start with Islamic greeting, oral discussions about students’ day, the day name and the weather, followed by quick revision of the previously learnt materials. Students then use textbook I Learn Arabic Multi Languages Textbook Level 1 for reading and I learn Arabic Multi Languages Workbook Level 2 for writing activities. Students are also given the opportunity to take home small short Arabic stories to read.

Scope and Sequence

The Arabic scope and sequence in the lower years lies in familiarizing students with the Arabic names of everyday objects and actions in their daily lives, in order to allow them to use these words in the correct context.

Year 3 Arabic scope and sequence
Term 1 Term 2 Term 3 Term 4
Healthy Food Body Parts Daily Routine Identity

Assessment

In Arabic, students are assessed anecdotally whilst actively participating in activities and through their identification and pronunciation of the Arabic letters and their ability to write and use them independently.

Resources

Arabic Resources include:

  • Arabic in Kindergarten Textbook Level Pre-K2
  • Easyword Arabic Handwriting Book 1
  • Interactive White Board
  • Posters, Flashcards, Games and Hands on activities

Benchmarks and Recommendations

By the end of Year 3, students learning Arabic are expected to be able to, identify and read words with correct pronunciation, form joint words and letters and spell familiar words correctly and show neat handwriting consistently. Year 3 students are also given the opportunity to engage with students from suburban schools learning Arabic, through the inter-school competitions and visits.

 

 

Year 4

Overview

In Year 4, students build on their previous knowledge and there is an emphasis on forming more complex words /sentences in Arabic. Students describe the status of the weather using complex sentences.Grade4 students are encouraged to use more Arabic commands and sentences during class. They continue building their knowledge about long and short vowel sounds, joining the letters, forming simple and more complex sentences and using the correct grammar. They also begin to work on Projects.

Lesson Structure

Arabic lessons typically start with Islamic greeting, oral discussions about students’ day, the day name and the weather, followed by quick revision of the previously learnt materials. Students then use the Iqra Arabic Reader Textbook Level 2 for reading and workbook activities. Students are also given the opportunity to take home small short Arabic stories to read.

Scope and Sequence

The Arabic scope and sequence in the upper years lies in developing proficiency when forming simple and complex sentences relating to everyday experiences, in order to allow them to communicate more effectively.

Year 4 Arabic scope and sequence
Term 1 Term 2 Term 3 Term 4
Seasons Weather Transport Sport

Assessment

In Arabic, students are assessed anecdotally whilst actively participating in activities and through their identification and pronunciation of the Arabic letters and their ability to write and use them independently.

Resources

Arabic Resources include:

  • Iqra Arabic Reader Textbook Level 2
  • Iqra Arabic Reader Workbook Level 2
  • Interactive White Board
  • Posters, Flashcards, Games and Hands on activities

Benchmarks and Recommendations

By the end of Year 4, students learning Arabic are expected to be able to, identify and read words with correct pronunciation, form joint words and letters and spell familiar words correctly and show neat handwriting consistently. Year 4 students are also expected to be able to communicate projects by forming simple and some complex sentences.

 

Year 5

Overview

In Year 5, students build on their previous knowledge and there is an emphasis on forming more complex sentences in Arabic. Students describe the status of the weather using longer sentences. Year 5 students are encouraged to use more Arabic commands and sentences during class. They continue building their knowledge about long and short vowel sounds, joining the letters, forming simple and more complex sentences and using the correct grammar. Year 5 students are also taught how to write short paragraphs/stories in Arabic.

Lesson Structure

Arabic lessons typically start with the Islamic greeting, oral discussions about students’ day, the day name and the weather, followed by quick revision. Students use textbook I Learn Arabic Multi Languages Textbook Level 3, as well as an Arabic dictionary to broaden their vocabulary using the Al-Maurid Dictionary.

Scope and Sequence

The Arabic scope and sequence in the upper years lies in developing proficiency when forming simple and complex sentences relating to everyday experiences, in order to allow them to communicate more effectively.

Year 5 Arabic scope and sequence
Term 1 Term 2 Term 3 Term 4
Islamic Manners Cleanliness Role Models My Parents

Assessment

In Arabic, students are assessed anecdotally whilst actively participating in activities and through their identification and pronunciation of the Arabic letters and their ability to write and use them independently.

Resources

Arabic Resources include:

  • I Learn Arabic Multi Languages Textbook Level 3
  • Al-Maurid Dictionary
  • Interactive White Board
  • Posters, Flashcards, Games and Hands on activities

Benchmarks and Recommendations

By the end of Year 5, students learning Arabic are expected to be able to, read simple sentences with correct pronunciation, form sentences independently and show neat handwriting consistently. Year 5 students are also expected to be able to communicate projects using detailed sentences.

 

 

Year 6

Overview

In Year 6, students build on their previous knowledge and there is an emphasis on forming more complex sentences in Arabic. Students describe the status of the weather using longer sentences. Year 6 students are encouraged to use more Arabic commands and sentences during class. They continue building their knowledge about long and short vowel sounds, joining the letters, forming simple and more complex sentences and using the correct grammar. Year 6 students are also taught how to write short paragraphs/stories in Arabic.

Lesson Structure

Arabic lessons typically start with Islamic greeting, oral discussions about students’ day, the day name and the weather, followed by quick revision of the previously learnt materials. Students use the textbook ‘I love and Learn the Arabic Language Textbook Level 4’, as well as an Arabic dictionary to broaden their vocabulary (Al-Maurid Dictionary).

Scope and Sequence

The Arabic scope and sequence in the upper years lies in developing proficiency when forming simple and complex sentences relating to everyday experiences, in order to allow them to communicate more effectively.

Year 6 Arabic scope and sequence
Term 1 Term 2 Term 3 Term 4
Islamic Manners Friendship Hobbies Occupation

Assessment

In Arabic, students are assessed anecdotally whilst actively participating in activities and through their identification and pronunciation of the Arabic letters and their ability to write and use them independently.

Resources

Arabic Resources include:

  • I love and Learn the Arabic Language Textbook Level 4
  • Al-Maurid Dictionary
  • Interactive White Board
  • Posters, Flashcards, Games and Hands on activities

Benchmarks and Recommendations

By the end of Year 6, students learning Arabic are expected to be able to, read simple sentences with correct pronunciation, form sentences independently and show neat handwriting consistently. Year 6 students are also expected to be able to communicate projects using detailed sentences and write short recounts.