History and Geography


Year-Reception (FOUNDATION)

Overview

History involves the learning and understanding of human experience through the use of various references and derived evidence. The History Curriculum addresses world history as a whole, incorporating within it, Australian history, in order to give students a well-rounded understanding of history on a local, regional and global level. Teaching Australia in the light of world history helps to increase student appreciation of Australian history and the development of Australia as a nation as well as provide them with a greater understanding of Australia’s indigenous peoples, their identity and cultures.

Lesson Structure

While History is a key learning area, it is not taught in isolation. Lessons to develop an understanding of History emphasises process as well as product, moving away from the acquisition of facts to the development of understandings about concepts and generalisations. These understandings are integrated into English and Mathematics as well as other learning areas. The focus is on developing students’ investigative and thinking skills and contribute to their ability to participate effectively in society. The lessons aim to engage students with hands on experiences and activities that encourage them to ask questions and with support, discover ways of finding answers to their enquiries. Lessons also contribute to enhancing self-esteem by encouraging students to take responsibility for their own learning as they acquire cooperative learning habits, whilst working in teams.

Scope and Sequence

History is organised into two interrelated strands: Historical Knowledge and Understanding and Historical Skills. The two strands are integrated in the development of term planners. The Historical Knowledge and Understanding strand provides the contexts through which particular skills are to be developed while the Historical Skills provide a common focus for the teaching and learning of the content. The following scope and sequence is followed when teaching History:

Reception History Scope and Sequence
Term 1 Term 2 Term 3 Term 4
Personal and Family Histories

 

Assessment

Assessment includes:

  • Diagnostic assessment during the engage phase of the History Inquiry unit to gauge understandings
  • Ongoing anecdotal notes/checklist of the skills attained
  • Projects with attached rubrics
  • Formal and informal summative topic tests

Resources

Graphic organizers are used to frame students’ wonderings and their ideas and the direction for further learning and inquiry into the topic is determined and personalized to suit each student and class.

Benchmarks and Recommendations

Due to History being an inquiry into the past, the collection of evidence to form understandings is very important. Parents’ verbal interactions with students and their assistance in recounting personal and family Histories is vital in developing these understandings.

Reception/Foundation Year Achievement Standard

By the end of the Reception/Foundation year, students identify similarities and differences between families. They recognise how important family events are commemorated.

Students sequence familiar events in order. They pose questions about their past. Students relate a story about their past using a range of texts.

 

 

Year 1

Overview

History involves the learning and understanding of human experience through the use of various references and derived evidence. The History Curriculum addresses world history as a whole, incorporating within it, Australian history, in order to give students a well-rounded understanding of history on a local, regional and global level. Teaching Australia in the light of world history helps to increase student appreciation of Australian history and the development of Australia as a nation as well as provide them with a greater understanding of Australia’s indigenous peoples, their identity and cultures.

Lesson Structure

While History is a key learning area, it is not taught in isolation. Lessons to develop an understanding of History emphasises process as well as product, moving away from the acquisition of facts to the development of understandings about concepts and generalisations. These understandings are integrated into English and Mathematics as well as other learning areas. The focus is on developing students’ investigative and thinking skills and contribute to their ability to participate effectively in society. The lessons aim to engage students with hands on experiences and activities that encourage them to ask questions and with support, discover ways of finding answers to their enquiries. Lessons also contribute to enhancing self-esteem by encouraging students to take responsibility for their own learning as they acquire cooperative learning habits, whilst working in teams.

Scope and Sequence

History is organised into two interrelated strands: Historical Knowledge and Understanding and Historical Skills. The two strands are integrated in the development of term planners. The Historical Knowledge and Understanding strand provides the contexts through which particular skills are to be developed while the Historical Skills provide a common focus for the teaching and learning of the content. The following scope and sequence is followed when teaching History:

Teaching staff will add the topic content when designing their programs

History – Year 1 – Scope and Sequence
Term 1 Term 2 Term 3 Term 4
Present and Past Family Life

Assessment

Assessment includes:

  • Diagnostic assessment during the engage phase of the History Inquiry unit to gauge understandings
  • Ongoing anecdotal notes/checklist of the skills attained
  • Projects with attached rubrics
  • Formal and informal summative topic tests

Resources

Graphic organizers are used to frame students’ wonderings and their ideas and the direction for further learning and inquiry into the topic is determined and personalized to suit each student and class.

Benchmarks and Recommendations

Due to History being an inquiry into the past, the collection of evidence to form understandings is very important. Parents’ verbal interactions with students and their assistance in recounting personal and family Histories is vital in developing these understandings.

Year 1 Achievement Standard

By the end of Year 1, students explain how some aspects of daily life have changed over recent time while others have remained the same. They describe personal and family events that have significance.

Students sequence events in order, using everyday terms about the passing of time. They pose questions about the past and examine sources (physical and visual) to suggest answers to these questions. Students relate stories about life in the past, using a range of texts.

 

 

 

Year 2

Overview

History, involves the learning and understanding of human experience through the use of various references and derived evidence. The History Curriculum addresses world history as a whole, incorporating within it, Australian history, in order to give students a well-rounded understanding of history on a local, regional and global level. Teaching Australia in the light of world history helps to increase student appreciation of Australian history and the development of Australia as a nation as well as provide them with a greater understanding of Australia’s indigenous peoples, their identity and cultures.

Lesson Structure

While History is a key learning area, it is not taught in isolation. Lessons to develop an understanding of History emphasises process as well as product, moving away from the acquisition of facts to the development of understandings about concepts and generalisations. These understandings are integrated into English and Mathematics as well as other learning areas. The focus is on developing students’ investigative and thinking skills and contribute to their ability to participate effectively in society. The lessons aim to engage students with hands on experiences and activities that encourage them to ask questions and with support, discover ways of finding answers to their enquiries. Lessons also contribute to enhancing self-esteem by encouraging students to take responsibility for their own learning as they acquire cooperative learning habits, whilst working in teams.

Scope and Sequence

History is organised into two interrelated strands: Historical Knowledge and Understanding and Historical Skills. The two strands are integrated in the development of term planners. The Historical Knowledge and Understanding strand provides the contexts through which particular skills are to be developed while the Historical Skills provide a common focus for the teaching and learning of the content with the following History scope and sequence:

Teaching staff will add the topic content when designing their programs

History – Year 2 – Scope and Sequence
Term 1 Term 2 Term 3 Term 4
The Past in the Present

 

Assessment

Assessment includes:

  • Diagnostic assessment during the engage phase of the History Inquiry unit to gauge understandings
  • Ongoing anecdotal notes/checklist of the skills attained
  • Projects with attached rubrics
  • Formal and informal summative topic tests

Resources

Graphic organizers are used to frame students’ wonderings and their ideas and the direction for further learning and inquiry into the topic is determined and personalized to suit each student and class.

Benchmarks and Recommendations

Due to History being an inquiry into the past, the collection of evidence to form understandings is very important. Parents’ verbal interactions with students and their assistance in recounting personal and family Histories is vital in developing these understandings.

Year 2 Achievement Standard

By the end of Year 2, students analyse aspects of daily life to identify how some have changed over recent time while others have remained the same. They describe a person, site or event of significance in the local community.

Students sequence events in order, using a range of terms related to time. They pose questions about the past and use sources provided (physical, visual, oral) to answer these questions. They compare objects from the past and present. Students develop a narrative about the past using a range of texts.

Year 3

Overview

History, involves the learning and understanding of human experience through the use of various references and derived evidence. The History Curriculum addresses world history as a whole, incorporating within it, Australian history, in order to give students a well-rounded understanding of history on a local, regional and global level. Teaching Australia in the light of world history helps to increase student appreciation of Australian history and the development of Australia as a nation as well as provide them with a greater understanding of Australia’s indigenous peoples, their identity and cultures.

Lesson Structure

While History is a key learning area, it is not taught in isolation. Lessons to develop an understanding of History emphasises process as well as product, moving away from the acquisition of facts to the development of understandings about concepts and generalisations. These understandings are integrated into English and Mathematics as well as other learning areas. The focus is on developing students’ investigative and thinking skills and contribute to their ability to participate effectively in society. The lessons aim to engage students with hands on experiences and activities that encourage them to ask questions and with support, discover ways of finding answers to their enquiries. Lessons also contribute to enhancing self-esteem by encouraging students to take responsibility for their own learning as they acquire cooperative learning habits, whilst working in teams.

Scope and Sequence

History is organised into two interrelated strands: Historical Knowledge and Understanding and Historical Skills. The two strands are integrated in the development of term planners. The Historical Knowledge and Understanding strand provides the contexts through which particular skills are to be developed while the Historical Skills provide a common focus for the teaching and learning of the content. The following scope and sequence is followed when teaching History:

Teaching staff will add the topic content when designing their programs

History – Year 3 – Scope and Sequence
Term 1 Term 2 Term 3 Term 4
Community and Remembrance

Assessment

Assessment includes:

  • Diagnostic assessment during the engage phase of the History Inquiry unit to gauge understandings
  • Ongoing anecdotal notes/checklist of the skills attained
  • Projects with attached rubrics
  • Formal and informal summative topic tests

Resources

Graphic organizers are used to frame students’ wonderings and their ideas and the direction for further learning and inquiry into the topic is determined and personalized to suit each student and class.

Benchmarks and Recommendations

Due to History being an inquiry into the past, the collection of evidence to form understandings is very important. Parents’ verbal interactions with students and their assistance in recounting personal and family Histories is vital in developing these understandings.

Year 3 Achievement Standard

By the end of Year 3, students explain how communities changed in the past. They describe the experiences of an individual or group. They identify events and aspects of the past that have significance in the present.

Students sequence events and people (their lifetime) in chronological order, with reference to key dates. They pose questions about the past and locate information from sources (written, physical, visual, oral) to answer these questions. Students develop texts, including narratives, using terms denoting time.

 

 

Year 4

Overview

History, involves the learning and understanding of human experience through the use of various references and derived evidence. The History Curriculum addresses world history as a whole, incorporating within it, Australian history, in order to give students a well-rounded understanding of history on a local, regional and global level. Teaching Australia in the light of world history helps to increase student appreciation of Australian history and the development of Australia as a nation as well as provide them with a greater understanding of Australia’s indigenous peoples, their identity and cultures.

Lesson Structure

While History is a key learning area, it is not taught in isolation. Lessons to develop an understanding of History emphasises process as well as product, moving away from the acquisition of facts to the development of understandings about concepts and generalisations. These understandings are integrated into English and Mathematics as well as other learning areas. The focus is on developing students’ investigative and thinking skills and contribute to their ability to participate effectively in society. The lessons aim to engage students with hands on experiences and activities that encourage them to ask questions and with support, discover ways of finding answers to their enquiries. Lessons also contribute to enhancing self-esteem by encouraging students to take responsibility for their own learning as they acquire cooperative learning habits, whilst working in teams.

Scope and Sequence

History is organised into two interrelated strands: Historical Knowledge and Understanding and Historical Skills. The two strands are integrated in the development of term planners. The Historical Knowledge and Understanding strand provides the contexts through which particular skills are to be developed while the Historical Skills provide a common focus for the teaching and learning of the content. The following scope and sequence is followed when teaching History:

Teaching staff will add the topic content when designing their programs

History – Year 4 – Scope and Sequence
Term 1 Term 2 Term 3 Term 4
First Contacts

 

Assessment

Assessment includes:

  • Diagnostic assessment during the engage phase of the History Inquiry unit to gauge understandings
  • Ongoing anecdotal notes/checklist of the skills attained
  • Projects with attached rubrics
  • Formal and informal summative topic tests

Resources

Graphic organizers are used to frame students’ wonderings and their ideas and the direction for further learning and inquiry into the topic is determined and personalized to suit each student and class.

Benchmarks and Recommendations

Due to History being an inquiry into the past, the collection of evidence to form understandings is very important. Parents’ verbal interactions with students and their assistance in recounting personal and family Histories is vital in developing these understandings.

Year 4 Achievement Standard

By the end of Year 4, students explain how and why life changed in the past, and identify aspects of the past that remained the same. They describe the experiences of an individual or group over time. They recognise the significance of events in bringing about change.

Students sequence events and people (their lifetime) in chronological order to identify key dates. They pose a range of questions about the past. They identify sources (written, physical, visual, oral), and locate information to answer these questions. They recognise different points of view. Students develop and present texts, including narratives, using historical terms.

Year 5

Overview

History, involves the learning and understanding of human experience through the use of various references and derived evidence. The History Curriculum addresses world history as a whole, incorporating within it, Australian history, in order to give students a well-rounded understanding of history on a local, regional and global level. Teaching Australia in the light of world history helps to increase student appreciation of Australian history and the development of Australia as a nation as well as provide them with a greater understanding of Australia’s indigenous peoples, their identity and cultures.

Lesson Structure

While History is a key learning area, it is not taught in isolation. Lessons to develop an understanding of History emphasises process as well as product, moving away from the acquisition of facts to the development of understandings about concepts and generalisations. These understandings are integrated into English and Mathematics as well as other learning areas. The focus is on developing students’ investigative and thinking skills and contribute to their ability to participate effectively in society. The lessons aim to engage students with hands on experiences and activities that encourage them to ask questions and with support, discover ways of finding answers to their enquiries. Lessons also contribute to enhancing self-esteem by encouraging students to take responsibility for their own learning as they acquire cooperative learning habits, whilst working in teams.

Scope and Sequence

History is organised into two interrelated strands: Historical Knowledge and Understanding and Historical Skills. The two strands are integrated in the development of term planners. The Historical Knowledge and Understanding strand provides the contexts through which particular skills are to be developed while the Historical Skills provide a common focus for the teaching and learning of the content. The following scope and sequence is followed when teaching History:

Teaching staff will add the topic content when designing their programs

History – Year 5 – Scope and Sequence
Term 1 Term 2 Term 3 Term 4
The Australian Colonies

Assessment

Assessment includes:

  • Diagnostic assessment during the engage phase of the History Inquiry unit to gauge understandings
  • Ongoing anecdotal notes/checklist of the skills attained
  • Projects with attached rubrics
  • Formal and informal summative topic tests

Resources

Graphic organizers are used to frame students’ wonderings and their ideas and the direction for further learning and inquiry into the topic is determined and personalized to suit each student and class.

Benchmarks and Recommendations

Due to History being an inquiry into the past, the collection of evidence to form understandings is very important. Parents’ verbal interactions with students and their assistance in recounting personal and family Histories is vital in developing these understandings.

Year 5 Achievement Standard

By the end of Year 5, students identify the causes and effects of change on particular communities, and describe aspects of the past that remained the same. They describe the different experiences of people in the past. They describe the significance of people and events in bringing about change.

Students sequence events and people (their lifetime) in chronological order, using timelines. When researching, students develop questions to frame an historical inquiry. They identify a range of sources and locate and record information related to this inquiry. They examine sources to identify points of view. Students develop, organise and present their texts, particularly narratives and descriptions, using historical terms and concepts.

 

 

 

Year 6

Overview

History, involves the learning and understanding of human experience through the use of various references and derived evidence. The History Curriculum addresses world history as a whole, incorporating within it, Australian history, in order to give students a well-rounded understanding of history on a local, regional and global level. Teaching Australia in the light of world history helps to increase student appreciation of Australian history and the development of Australia as a nation as well as provide them with a greater understanding of Australia’s indigenous peoples, their identity and cultures.

Lesson Structure

While History is a key learning area, it is not taught in isolation. Lessons to develop an understanding of History emphasises process as well as product, moving away from the acquisition of facts to the development of understandings about concepts and generalisations. These understandings are integrated into English and Mathematics as well as other learning areas. The focus is on developing students’ investigative and thinking skills and contribute to their ability to participate effectively in society. The lessons aim to engage students with hands on experiences and activities that encourage them to ask questions and with support, discover ways of finding answers to their enquiries. Lessons also contribute to enhancing self-esteem by encouraging students to take responsibility for their own learning as they acquire cooperative learning habits, whilst working in teams.

Scope and Sequence

History is organised into two interrelated strands: Historical Knowledge and Understanding and Historical Skills. The two strands are integrated in the development of term planners. The Historical Knowledge and Understanding strand provides the contexts through which particular skills are to be developed while the Historical Skills provide a common focus for the teaching and learning of the content. The following scope and sequence is followed when teaching History:

Teaching staff will add the topic content when designing their programs

History – Year 6 – Scope and Sequence
Term 1 Term 2 Term 3 Term 4
Australia as a Nation

Assessment

Assessment includes:

  • Diagnostic assessment during the engage phase of the History Inquiry unit to gauge understandings
  • Ongoing anecdotal notes/checklist of the skills attained
  • Projects with attached rubrics
  • Formal and informal summative topic tests

Resources

Graphic organizers are used to frame students’ wonderings and their ideas and the direction for further learning and inquiry into the topic is determined and personalized to suit each student and class.

Benchmarks and Recommendations

Due to History being an inquiry into the past, the collection of evidence to form understandings is very important. Parents’ verbal interactions with students and their assistance in recounting personal and family Histories is vital in developing these understandings.

Year 6 Achievement Standard

By the end of Year 6, students identify change and continuity and describe the causes and effects of change on society. They compare the different experiences of people in the past. They explain the significance of an individual and group.

Students sequence events and people (their lifetime) in chronological order, and represent time by creating timelines. When researching, students develop questions to frame an historical inquiry. They identify a range of sources and locate and compare information to answer inquiry questions. They examine sources to identify and describe points of view. Students develop texts, particularly narratives and descriptions. In developing these texts and organising and presenting their information, they use historical terms and concepts and incorporate relevant sources.

 

 

 

Geography

Rationale

Geography is a structured way of exploring, analysing and understanding the characteristics of the places that make up our world, using the concepts of place, space, environment, interconnection, sustainability, scale and change. It addresses scales from the personal to the global and time periods from a few years to thousands of years.

Geography integrates knowledge from the natural sciences, social sciences and humanities to build a holistic understanding of the world. Students learn to question why the world is the way it is, reflect on their relationships with and responsibilities for that world, and propose actions designed to shape a socially just and sustainable future.

The concept of place develops students’ curiosity and wonder about the diversity of the world’s places, peoples, cultures and environments. Students use the concept of space to investigate the effects of location and distance on the characteristics of places, the significance of spatial distributions, and the organisation and management of space at different scales.

Students use the concept of interconnection to understand how the causal relationships between places, people and environments produce constant changes to their characteristics.

Through the concept of sustainability students explore how the environmental functions that support their life and wellbeing can be sustained.

Geography uses an inquiry approach to assist students to make meaning of their world. At Garden College Geography is part of the integrated studies curriculum.

The Australian Curriculum’ Geography curriculum is structured in two strands:

  • Geographical Knowledge and Understanding – which includes a study of environmental and human aspects of geography at local, national, regional and global scales. This strand involves the investigation of the facts, generalisations, principles, theories and models developed in geography. The geography curriculum recognises that this knowledge is dynamic and its interpretation can be contested, that people can come to different conclusions about the same questions, and that opinions and conclusions must be supported by evidence and logical argument. This strand involves students developing the ability to see the relationships between geographical concepts (place, space, environment, interconnection, sustainability, scale and change), to construct explanatory frameworks to illustrate relationships, and to synthesise them into an integrated whole. It is also about applying this geographical knowledge to new situations or to solve problems by thinking and planning for action.
  • Geography Inquiry and Skills: This strand promotes a process of inquiry by which students learn new geographical knowledge and deepen their understanding. This is developed through investigations that involve observations or questions (for example, about environmental, social, cultural and economic features) the collection and interpretation of information to develop conclusions; and reflection on the overall process. Inquiries may be undertaken by individual students, or collaboratively, and may vary in scale, geographic context, and the time taken for the investigation. There is an emphasis on the techniques that geographers use in the field and in the classroom. Students learn to think critically about the methods used to obtain information and to analyse and interpret the information in order to communicate their findings.

Key skills which are progressively developed include (but are not limited to) formulating a question and research action plan that is of a specific geographical nature, developing observation recording skills including diagrams such as field sketches, interpreting and developing maps, tables, photographs, satellite images, diagrams, graphs and other data, using a variety of spatial technologies and communicating with appropriate and relevant geographical vocabulary.

 

The knowledge, skills and dispositions students need to succeed in life and work in the twenty-first century have been identified in the Australian Curriculum as general capabilities. There are seven general capabilities which will be integrated within lesson planning so that Geography is contextual:

  • Literacy
  • Numeracy
  • Competence in information and communication technology (ICT)
  • Critical and creative thinking
  • Ethical behavior
  • Ethical behavior
  • Personal and social competence
  • Intercultural understanding

Scope and sequence Reception to Year 6

 

Reception to 6 Geography Scope and Sequence
Reception Year 1 Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 Year 5 Year 6
We discover the local community – My Home We discover the local community – My Local Community We discover the local community – My Land Australia Australia is a unique place with much to be proud of We live in an environment where the changing environment affects us Climate and Activities – We live in a world where the changing environment affects us Going Global – Environments are changing and we need to take responsibility for their sustainability

 

 

 

 

RECEPTION/FOUNDATION TO YEAR 2

Overview

Curriculum Focus – Exploring local and more distant places

In Reception/Foundation to Year 2 the curriculum focuses on exploring the geography of their lives and their own place, to get students thinking about aspects of place, space and environment. They observe, describe and classify the features of their place, using models, maps, sounds, stories and drawings. Learning about their own place, and building a connection with it, also contributes to their sense of identity and belonging. While the local place should be the initial focus for learning, young students are also aware of and interested in more distant places and the curriculum provides opportunities to build on this curiosity. Students find out about the ways they are connected to places throughout the world through family and cultural groups in their community, the origin of familiar products, travel and world events.

Students’ spatial thinking starts by learning about direction and distance, and about the ways that familiar things can be arranged in space for different purposes. They become aware of the distances between places and how distance constrains their activities. Students are introduced to the concept of environment through the exploration of the natural and built environment of their own and other places, by finding out about the environmental resources they use and where these come from, and by recognising that weather varies from place to place. They become aware of why the environment needs to be cared for.

Specific geographical skills which are introduced throughout the early years include creating, interpreting and using a map, using directional language, understanding scale and distance, and recording data related to weather.

Lesson Structures

The equivalent of one Term will be dedicated to the study of Geography. In the early years it will be part of the integrated curriculum using play, inquiry and higher order thinking to discover their world. Models, maps and dioramas will be developed so display deep knowledge and understandings. Students will use geography language to describe their constructions, diagrams, maps and written work.

Geography emphasises inquiry-based learning and teaching, and opportunities for student-led questioning and investigation will be provided at all stages of schooling. The curriculum will provide opportunities for fieldwork and excursions, as this is an essential component of geographical learning. Fieldwork is any study undertaken outside the classroom, and could be within the school grounds, around the neighbouring streets, or in more distant locations.

Scope and Sequence

  Reception to Year 2 – Geography Scope and Sequence
  Term 1 Term 2 Term 3 Term 4
Rec Where we Live – My home
Year 1 Not everywhere is the same – My local Community
Year 2 Links to our world – My land Australia

Reception/Foundation Year

Big idea: Where we live

The Foundation curriculum builds student’s understanding of places. Students explore the place in which they live and places that they know. They observe natural features and built features of these places and consider places that are special to them. Space is introduced when students observe how places and objects are arranged, and experiment with different ways of arranging familiar spaces, like the classroom. The study of weather in science is extended through discussion of how the daily weather influences the location of activities. Students are encouraged to ask questions about the world that they can answer through collective inquiry involving observation and play. They will be introduced to the stages of inquiry by reflecting on how their thinking has changed.

 

 

Year 1

Big Idea: Not everywhere is the same

The Year 1 curriculum expands the understanding of familiar places explored in Foundation. Students are guided to see familiar places as part of bigger places and they begin identifying how places change. Spatial understanding is expanded from exploring the arrangement of space in Foundation to recognising ways that places are used. Students learn more about the environmental features of places, and begin to consider ways of caring for the environment. The inquiry process is guided and students are introduced to geographical tools that help them develop their skills and answer their questions.

 

 

Year 2

Big Idea: Links to our world

The Year 2 curriculum builds on student learning about places in earlier years by exploring people’s connections with other places. Students then expand their geographical knowledge by finding out about these other places and using an increasing variety of information sources. Their spatial understanding is extended from reviewing the use of spaces to examining how distance influences the places they go to. Year 2 learning about environment builds on the Foundation study of weather and students learn about the weather in different places. Students apply their previous learning about environment as they recognise the environment as the source for things they use and consider how significant places are protected. The inquiry process continues to be guided and students are introduced to geographical tools and skills that help them answer their questions.

Assessment

The teaching and learning methods outlined under ‘lesson structure’ will be supported by forms of assessment that enable students to demonstrate their ability to think geographically and apply geographical skills. This will include:

  • The construction of models, diagrams, maps, graphs
  • Written work
  • Oral presentations
  • Peer assessment

Resources

No particular resources have been purchased. When staff are selected they will ascertain appropriate resources both in hard and electronic copies. The Australian Curriculum Geography Content Descriptors and Elaborations will provide staff with information when programming.

Australian Curriculum Achievement Standards

By the end of the Reception/Foundation Year, students describe the key characteristics of some familiar places. They explain how particular places are special to them and how they can be cared for. They locate and represent places and features on simple maps. They can talk about how weather has an effect on life in a place. Students can represent and describe the layout of familiar places.

Students pose and answer questions about their world by observing familiar places. They sort their observations and represent them using a given format. Students talk about how their thinking has changed.

By the end of Year 1, students explain how some places are different in their use, and change over time. They describe the different environmental features of places and explain how people can have an effect upon places and the environments within them.

Students pose and respond to questions in a guided inquiry using information sources provided. They use data and images to draw conclusions about places. They present their findings using a variety of geographical texts (oral, visual, written).

 

By the end of Year 2, students explain that they are connected to other places and that distance influences people’s use of a place. They recognise that the environment is the source of everything they use, suggest consequences of consumption and examine how the significance of an environment contributes to its use.

Students pose and respond to several questions using fieldwork and information sources provided. They collect and sort their information to identify patterns and draw conclusions. When communicating their findings, students use geographical tools and geographical vocabulary. They talk about how their learning has changed.

 

 

Years 3 and 4

Overview

Curriculum focus: Investigating places

In Years 3 & 4 students are able to ask more complex geographical questions, and to contribute to planning their geographical inquiries and learning. They can provide reasons for what they think, and justify their conclusions. The curriculum focus shifts from exploration to more purposeful investigation.

Students learn ways to describe and compare places, about different cultures, and to investigate how people perceive and think about places. They are aware of a larger number of places, and may have travelled to some of them. Their spatial knowledge is developed through studies of the major divisions of the earth’s surface, of the location and main characteristics of the States, Territories and major cities of Australia, and of ways of explaining a spatial distribution. This is in conjunction with the history curriculum.

They investigate several aspects of Aboriginal Peoples’ and Torres Strait Islander Peoples’ life before European colonial presence. Their environmental understanding is developed through studies of landforms, weather and their personal environmental impact. In their investigations, students collaborate to collect and record evidence, analyse, draw conclusions and communicate their findings, using appropriate geographical vocabulary.

Specific geographical skills in Years 3-4 build on those skills which are included in the early years and also include the introduction of the use of spatial technologies, map projections and the use of scale.

Lesson Structure

The equivalent of one Term will be dedicated to the study of Geography. In Years 3 and 4 Geography will use inquiry and higher order thinking to discover the student’s world. Models, maps and dioramas will be developed so display deep knowledge and understandings. Students will use geography language to describe their constructions, diagrams, maps and written work.

Geography emphasises inquiry-based learning and teaching, and opportunities for student-led questioning and investigation should be provided at all stages of schooling. The curriculum should also provide opportunities for fieldwork at all stages, as this is an essential component of geographical learning. Fieldwork is any study undertaken outside the classroom, and could be within the school grounds, around the neighbouring streets, or in more distant locations. These teaching and learning methods should be supported by forms of assessment that enable students to demonstrate their ability to think geographically and apply geographical skills.

Scope and Sequence

  Years 3 and 4 – Geography Scope and Sequence
  Term 1 Term 2 Term 3 Term 4
Year 3 How we Live – Australia is a unique place with much to be proud of

 

Year 4 How we Live – We live in an environment where the changing environment affects us

Year 3

Big Idea: How we live

The Year 3 curriculum for geography builds on previous learning about places as students are guided to describe and compare places in a geographic way. Students build on their learning about links between people and places as they examine the personal and cultural connections people have to places. In space, students apply abstract thinking to their earlier learning about layout and distances as they build understanding of how maps represent places. Students are also introduced to the ways natural resources are distributed across Australia and the world. This builds on Year 2 learning about the environment as the source of all they use and links to environment, where the concept of sustainability is formally introduced. Students then consider their own resource use and how they can reduce their impact. The inquiry strand builds on Years 1 and 2 as students are asked to identify whether questions are geographical and they consider the primary sources and secondary sources they can use to find answers.

 

Year 4

Big Idea: How we live

The Year 4 curriculum for geography builds on Year 3 exploration of connection to places by providing opportunities for students to consider the culture of places. Students link their learning to history by exploring the geography and spatial arrangement of Australia before European colonial presence. This also introduces them to exploring the geographic features of Australia and how they are distributed. To build on their earlier learning about distant places, investigation of places and environments moves to the global scale. Environment is further developed through studies of landforms and the influence of air masses on local weather. Students are asked to identify whether questions are geographical and consider the primary sources and secondary sources they can use to find answers. Students also explore cause and effect relationships by suggesting consequences for actions.

Assessment

The teaching and learning methods outlined under ‘lesson structure’ will be supported by forms of assessment that enable students to demonstrate their ability to think geographically and apply geographical skills. This will include:

  • The construction of models, diagrams, maps, graphs
  • Written work
  • Oral presentation
  • Peer assessment

Resources

No particular resources have been purchased. When staff are selected they will ascertain appropriate resources both in hard and electronic copies. The Australian Curriculum Geography Content Descriptors and Elaborations will provide staff with information when programming.

Australian Curriculum Achievement Standards

By the end of Year 3, students describe and compare the geographical features of places and recognise that people have different connections to places. They recognise that maps are used as geographical tools to represent places and relationships between places. They explain the location, uses and management of some natural resources in relation to sustainability.

Students select appropriate questions for a geographical inquiry. They suggest information sources and collect data in response to questions. They draw conclusions from their investigation. When communicating their conclusions, they use geographical tools and geographical vocabulary.

 

By the end of Year 4, students explain how the environment shapes the ways in which people live. They investigate and describe cultures or different ways of life around the world. They analyse personal and cultural perceptions of places and how these are described. Students describe the diversity of Australian environments and consider how natural processes have shaped the environment over time.

Students pose geographical questions and speculate about their answers. They identify geographical sources to gather information or data and consider the usefulness of these sources. They evaluate data to suggest relationships or patterns. Students draw conclusions from their inquiry and suggest responses. When communicating their conclusions, they use appropriate geographical tools and geographical vocabulary, using geographical conventions to show and describe what they have learned from an inquiry.

 

Years 5 and 6

Overview

Curriculum Focus: Analysing and Managing Places

In Years 5–6, students become more complex, critical, analytical and evaluative in their thinking. They are increasingly aware of their wider community, and are learning to take on individual and group responsibilities. The curriculum focus is on analysing and managing places, and students should be involved in at least one investigation of a local environmental, social or planning issue and how it is managed.

Their study of places near and far continues to expand, to those well beyond their immediate experience. They learn that places can be described and classified by their functions, gain a more complex view of how places are connected, and explore how to explain their characteristics. In Year 6 the study of scale shifts to the global, with an initial investigation of the distribution of the world’s population, wealth and health. In their studies of the environment, students build their knowledge of weather into the concept of climate and its influence, and are introduced to the concept of environmental sustainability. Climate and weather are also considered in a study of bushfires and their management.

Specific geographical skills in Years 5-6 continue to build upon the skills introduced in the early years and throughout Years 3-4. They also include interpreting spatial distribution, and developing and interpreting graphs and charts related to climate and weather.

Lesson Structure

The equivalent of one Term will be dedicated to the study of Geography. In Year 5 and 6 the study of Geography will use inquiry and higher order thinking to discover their world. Models, maps and dioramas will be developed so display deep knowledge and understandings. Students will use geography language to describe their constructions, diagrams, maps and written work.

Geography emphasises inquiry-based learning and teaching, and opportunities for student-led questioning and investigation should be provided at all stages of schooling. The curriculum should also provide opportunities for fieldwork at all stages, as this is an essential component of geographical learning. Fieldwork is any study undertaken outside the classroom, and could be within the school grounds, around the neighbouring streets, or in more distant locations. These teaching and learning methods should be supported by forms of assessment that enable students to demonstrate their ability to think geographically and apply geographical skills.

Scope and Sequence

  Year 5 and 6 – Geography Scope and Sequence
  Term 1 Term 2 Term 3 Term 4
Year 5 Climate and Activities – We live in a world where the changing environment affects us
Year 6 Going Global –Environments are changing and we need to take responsibility for their sustainability

Year 5

Big Idea: Climate and activities

The Year 5 curriculum for geography has a focus on building students’ ability to explain their world in a geographic way. It requires increased critical and analytical thinking. Students consider contemporary places and the functions they serve. This builds on their spatial knowledge of Australia in Year 4, by analysing the spatial distribution of human populations and activities, such as retailing and tourism at national and regional levels. The environmental theme is extended from earlier studies of weather into the idea of climate. Students discuss contemporary sustainability issues. The Inquiry and Skills strand builds on students’ analytical, decision-making and evaluation skills. They draw conclusions on issues and consider different viewpoints when thinking about what could or should happen in the future. Students reflect on the effectiveness of their inquiry, how their thinking is different to that of others and how it has changed as a result of their learning.

 

Year 6

Big Idea: Going Global

In the Year 6 curriculum for geography, students are immersed in considering place, space and environment through a global lens. Students begin to explore the connections between places and the impacts of these connections. Study of space also becomes global increasing students’ knowledge of places throughout the world and introduces them to some of the fundamental inequalities and differences across the world. The Inquiry and Skills strand builds students’ analytical, decision-making and evaluation skills. They draw conclusions on issues and consider different viewpoints when thinking about what could or should happen in the future. Students reflect on the effectiveness of their inquiry and how their thinking is different to that of others and has changed as a result of their learning.

Assessment

The teaching and learning methods outlined under ‘lesson structure’ will be supported by forms of assessment that enable students to demonstrate their ability to think geographically and apply geographical skills. This will include:

  • The construction of models, diagrams, maps, graphs
  • Written work
  • Oral presentation
  • Peer assessment

Resources

No particular resources have been purchased. When staff are selected they will ascertain appropriate resources both in hard and electronic copies. The Australian Curriculum Geography Content Descriptors and Elaborations will provide staff with information when programming.

Australian Curriculum Achievement Standards

By the end of Year 5, students analyse the different uses and functions of land in different places and at different scales. They reflect on sustainability to describe the features of a variety of places and explain how communities provide services and manage places. They describe patterns in human activities and explain how they have changed over time. They describe the relationships between climate and environments and human activity. Students evaluate the sustainability of a range of human activities and generate and justify a plan for action.

Students select geographical questions that range in complexity to guide an inquiry. They identify and use a variety of geographical information sources to gather information or data and judge the validity of these sources. When investigating, they identify and use appropriate materials, geographical tools and skills and equipment and manage the data they collect to identify patterns and relationships. They combine their data and information to draw conclusions.

When communicating their conclusions to a range of audiences, they select and use appropriate geographical tools and geographical vocabulary.