Curriculum: Secondary

Year 8

Aims & Objectives for 2018

The English curriculum is built around the three interrelated strands of language, literature and literacy. Together, the strands focus on developing students’ knowledge, understanding and skills in listening, reading, viewing, speaking, writing and creating. Learning in English builds on concepts, skills and processes developed in earlier years, and teachers will revisit and strengthen these as needed.

Receptive modes (listening, reading and viewing)
By the end of Year 8, students understand how the selection of text structures is influenced by the selection of language mode and how this varies for different purposes and audiences. Students explain how language features, images and vocabulary are used to represent different ideas and issues in texts.
Students interpret texts, questioning the reliability of sources of ideas and information. They select evidence from the text to show how events, situations and people can be represented from different viewpoints. They listen for and identify different emphases in texts, using that understanding to elaborate on discussions.

Productive modes (speaking, writing and creating)
Students understand how the selection of language features can be used for particular purposes and effects. They explain the effectiveness of language choices they make to influence the audience. Through combining ideas, images and language features from other texts, students show how ideas can be expressed in new ways.
Students create texts for different purposes, selecting language to influence audience response. They make presentations and contribute actively to class and group discussions, using language patterns for effect. When creating and editing texts to create specific effects, they take into account intended purposes and the needs and interests of audiences. They demonstrate understanding of grammar, select vocabulary for effect and use accurate spelling and punctuation.

Term 1

Term 1 main topic: Report Writing

  • students are going to be investigating a made-up murder case, taking on the role, initially, of the police constable. For this topic, students will complete various reports i.e. a criminal record, a police report, etc.

In term 1, students also:

  • complete Every-Day Edits to work on their editing skills
  • read a class novel and complete journal entries on what they have read
  • complete weekly spelling contracts
  • complete weekly spelling tests

Term 2

Term 2 main topic: Holiday Camp creation project

  • students create a fictional Holiday Camp for their school – they are to envision all of the elements of the Holiday Camp and present them persuasively.

In term 2, students also:

  • complete Every-Day Edits to work on their editing skills
  • read a novel of their choice individually and complete a short Q&A presentation
  • complete weekly spelling contracts
  • complete weekly spelling tests

Term 3

Term 3 main topic: Novel Study
In term 3, students also:

  • complete Every-Day Edits to work on their editing skills
  • read a novel of their choice individually and complete a short Q&A presentation
  • complete weekly spelling contracts
  • complete weekly spelling tests

Term 4

Term 4 main topic: Poetry
In term 4, students also:

  • complete Every-Day Edits to work on their editing skills
  • read a novel of their choice individually and complete a short Q&A presentation
  • complete weekly spelling contracts
  • complete weekly spelling tests

Assessment Methods

Formative Assessment:
Feedback:

  • Verbal
  • Written
  • Peer

Self-assessment:

  • Teacher sets clear expectations for student performance and coaches students on assessment criteria
  • students self-edit own work
  • students peer-edit

Summative Assessment:

  • Spelling tests
  • Spelling contracts
  • Verbal presentations
  • Summative assignments i.e. written reports, essays

Year 9

Aims & Objectives for 2018

The English curriculum is built around the three interrelated strands of language, literature and literacy. Together, the strands focus on developing students’ knowledge, understanding and skills in listening, reading, viewing, speaking, writing and creating. Learning in English builds on concepts, skills and processes developed in earlier years, and teachers will revisit and strengthen these as needed.

Receptive modes (listening, reading and viewing)
By the end of Year 9, students analyse the ways that text structures can be manipulated for effect. They analyse and explain how images, vocabulary choices and language features distinguish the work of individual authors.
They evaluate and integrate ideas and information from texts to form their own interpretations. They select evidence from texts to analyse and explain how language choices and conventions are used to influence an audience. They listen for ways texts position an audience.

Productive modes (speaking, writing and creating)
Students understand how to use a variety of language features to create different levels of meaning. They understand how interpretations can vary by comparing their responses to texts to the responses of others. In creating texts, students demonstrate how manipulating language features and images can create innovative texts.
Students create texts that respond to issues, interpreting and integrating ideas from other texts. They make presentations and contribute actively to class and group discussions, comparing and evaluating responses to ideas and issues. They edit for effect, selecting vocabulary and grammar that contribute to the precision and persuasiveness of texts and using accurate spelling and punctuation.

Term 1

Term 1 main topic: persuasive writing – print advertisements

  • students will be analysing a range of print advertisements and creating their own – looking specifically at target audience, visual techniques and other aspects of print advertisements.

In term 1, students also:

  • complete Every-Day Edits to work on their editing skills
  • read a class novel and complete journal entries on what they have read
  • complete weekly spelling contracts
  • complete weekly spelling tests
  • NAPLAN preparation

Term 2

Term 2 main topic: “The Blind Side” film study

  • students will consider and analyse themes such as family and racism.

In term 2, students also:

  • complete Every-Day Edits to work on their editing skills
  • read a novel of their choice individually and complete a short Q&A presentation
  • complete weekly spelling contracts
  • complete weekly spelling tests
  • NAPLAN preparation

Term 3

Term 3 main topic: Horror Story
In term 3, students also:

  • complete Every-Day Edits to work on their editing skills
  • read a novel of their choice individually and complete a short Q&A presentation
  • complete weekly spelling contracts
  • complete weekly spelling tests

Term 4

Term 4 main topic: Poetry / Novel Study
In term 4, students also:

  • complete Every-Day Edits to work on their editing skills
  • read a novel of their choice individually and complete a short Q&A presentation
  • complete weekly spelling contracts
  • complete weekly spelling tests

Assessment Methods

Formative Assessment:
Feedback:

  • Verbal
  • Written
  • Peer

Self-assessment:

  • Teacher sets clear expectations for student performance and coaches students on assessment criteria
  • students self-edit own work
  • students peer-edit

Summative Assessment:

  • Spelling tests
  • Spelling contracts
  • Verbal presentations
  • Summative assignments i.e. written reports, essays

Year 10

Aims & Objectives for 2018

The English curriculum is built around the three interrelated strands of language, literature and literacy. Teaching and learning programs should balance and integrate all three strands. Together, the strands focus on developing students’ knowledge, understanding and skills in listening, reading, viewing, speaking, writing and creating. Learning in English builds on concepts, skills and processes developed in earlier years, and teachers will revisit and strengthen these as needed.

In Years 9 and 10, students interact with peers, teachers, individuals, groups and community members in a range of face-to-face and online/virtual environments. They experience learning in familiar and unfamiliar contexts, including local community, vocational and global contexts.

Students engage with a variety of texts for enjoyment. They interpret, create, evaluate, discuss and perform a wide range of literary texts in which the primary purpose is aesthetic, as well as texts designed to inform and persuade. These include various types of media texts, including newspapers, film and digital texts, fiction, non-fiction, poetry, dramatic performances and multimodal texts, with themes and issues involving levels of abstraction, higher order reasoning and intertextual references. Students develop critical understanding of the contemporary media and the differences between media texts.

The range of literary texts for Foundation to Year 10 comprises Australian literature, including the oral narrative traditions of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples, as well as the contemporary literature of these two cultural groups, and classic and contemporary world literature, including texts from and about Asia.

Literary texts that support and extend students in Years 9 and 10 as independent readers are drawn from a range of genres and involve complex, challenging and unpredictable plot sequences and hybrid structures that may serve multiple purposes. These texts explore themes of human experience and cultural significance, interpersonal relationships, and ethical and global dilemmas within real-world and fictional settings and represent a variety of perspectives. Informative texts represent a synthesis of technical and abstract information (from credible/verifiable sources) about a wide range of specialised topics. Text structures are more complex and include chapters, headings and subheadings, tables of contents, indexes and glossaries. Language features include successive complex sentences with embedded clauses, a high proportion of unfamiliar and technical vocabulary, figurative and rhetorical language, and dense information supported by various types of graphics and images.

Students create a range of imaginative, informative and persuasive types of texts including narratives, procedures, performances, reports, discussions, literary analyses, transformations of texts and reviews.

Term 1

  • To Kill a Mocking Bird
  • Literacy
  • Reading

Term 2

  • Grammar
  • Literacy
  • Spelling
  • Short Stories
  • Poetry

Term 3

  • Grammar
  • Literacy
  • Spelling
  • Crime Unit

Term 4

  • Grammar
  • Literacy
  • Spelling
  • Mythology Unit

Assessment Methods

  • Weekly Classwork
  • Essays
  • Narratives
  • Critical Analysis
  • Creative Writing
  • Tests

Stage One

Aims & Objectives for 2018

Essential English is a 10-credit subject or a 20-credit subject at Stage 1, and a 20-credit subject at Stage 2.
In this subject students respond to and create texts in and for a range of personal, social, cultural, community, and/or workplace contexts.
Students understand and interpret information, ideas, and perspectives in texts and consider ways in which language choices are used to create meaning.

Performance Standards for 2018

The performance standards covered across the year are:

Communication

The specific features are as follows:
C1 Clarity and coherence of written and spoken expression, using appropriate vocabulary.
C2 Demonstration of grammatical control.

Comprehension

The specific features are as follows:
Cp1 Comprehension of information, ideas, and perspectives in texts.
Cp2 Understanding of the purpose, structure, and language features in texts.

Analysis

The specific features are as follows:
An1 Analysis of ways in which creators of texts convey information, ideas, and perspectives.
An2 Identification and analysis of ways in which language features are used to create meaning in texts.

Application

The specific feature is as follows:
Ap1 Creation of texts for different purposes, using appropriate textual conventions, in real or imagined contexts.

Assessment Methods

Assessment Type 1: Responding to Texts

Students produce written, oral, and/or multimodal responses to a text or texts.
For a 10-credit subject, students complete at least one response to text. For a 20-credit subject, students complete at least two responses to texts.
They may respond to texts in a variety of forms, including a series of short answers and/or extended responses. The length of responses to texts can vary. Some responses may be short, others may be longer; however, no response should be more than 800 words or 5 minutes, or the equivalent in multimodal form.
Responses to texts could include, for example:

  • a commentary on a workplace text
  • an oral presentation with visual images
  • an email in response to a text
  • a series of brief responses to a film text
  • a discussion of a film, television program, or game
  • a review or comment on a set of instructions (e.g. a manual)
  • a blog in response to a news item or sports report
  • a set of annotations on a community information text
  • a director’s commentary on a section of a visual or dramatic text
  • exploration of the use of language in a campaign (e.g. advertising, political, advocacy).

For this assessment type, students provide evidence of their learning primarily in relation to the following assessment design criteria:

  • communication
  • comprehension
  • analysis.

Assessment Type 2: Creating Texts

Students create written, oral, and/or multimodal texts.
For a 10-credit subject, students create at least one text. For a 20-credit subject, students create at least two texts.
The texts may be functional, informational, analytical, imaginative, interpretive, and/or persuasive in purpose.
Students may create texts in a variety of forms. The length of the texts can vary. Some texts may be short, others may be longer; however, no text should be more than 800 words or 5 minutes, or the equivalent in multimodal form.
The texts created could include, but are not limited to:

  • a role play in a community or workplace context
  • instructions describing a process in either a written, oral, or multimodal form
  • a workplace report (e.g. on an accident or recommendation to change a process)
  • a series of social media entries advocating for an issue
  • an email or vodcast complaining about a product or problem
  • a ‘how to’ guide explaining how to use sporting equipment
  • a thank-you (e.g. birthday, wedding, or awards night speech)
  • a section of a graphic novel
  • an advocacy website
  • an article on a topic or theme of interest
  • an interactive story
  • a multimodal presentation creatively presenting a topic, issue, or theme
  • a short film trailer
  • a creative written narrative
  • transformation of a traditional children’s story into a modern setting
  • a report incorporating visual elements on a topic of interest
  • a multimedia display to inform a target group about a community issue.

For this assessment type, students provide evidence of their learning primarily in relation to the following assessment design criteria:

  • communication
  • application.

Year 7

Aims & Objectives for 2018

By the end of Year 7, students solve problems involving the comparison, addition and subtraction of integers. They make the connections between whole numbers and index notation and the relationship between perfect squares and square roots. They solve problems involving percentages and all four operations with fractions and decimals. They compare the cost of items to make financial decisions. Students represent numbers using variables. They connect the laws and properties for numbers to algebra. They interpret simple linear representations and model authentic information. Students describe different views of three-dimensional objects. They represent transformations in the Cartesian plane. They solve simple numerical problems involving angles formed by a transversal crossing two lines. Students identify issues involving the collection of continuous data. They describe the relationship between the median and mean in data displays.

Students use fractions, decimals and percentages, and their equivalences. They express one quantity as a fraction or percentage of another. Students solve simple linear equations and evaluate algebraic expressions after numerical substitution. They assign ordered pairs to given points on the Cartesian plane. Students use formulas for the area and perimeter of rectangles and calculate volumes of rectangular prisms. Students classify triangles and quadrilaterals. They name the types of angles formed by a transversal crossing parallel line. Students determine the sample space for simple experiments with equally likely outcomes and assign probabilities to those outcomes. They calculate mean, mode, median and range for data sets. They construct stem-and-leaf plots and dot-plots.

Term 1

  • Whole numbers
  • Properties of numbers
  • Positive & negative numbers
  • Fractions
  • Decimal numbers
  • Percentage

Term 2

  • Algebra: expressions & formulae
  • Equations
  • Coordinates
  • Line graphs
  • Ratio & rates

Term 3

  • Angles, lines & parallelism
  • Polygons
  • Measurement
  • Transformations

Term 4

  • Solids
  • Probability
  • Statistics

Assessment Methods

Each term students will engage in the following assessments:

  • 2 Topic Quizzes
  • 1 Test (a combination of topics)
  • 1 Project

Year 8

Aims & Objectives for 2018

To enable students to:

  • Solve every day problems involving rates, ratios, profit and loss, volume of prisms and convert between units of measurement for Area, Volume and perimeter of different shapes.
  • Identify conditions of congruence, solve linear equations and graph linear relationships on the Cartesian plane.
  • Explain issues related to the collection of data and the effect of outliers on means and medians in that data.

Term 1

Number and Algebra

Natural numbers, Integers, index notation, order of operations, Primes and composites, square numbers and square roots.
Sets, component of a set, intersection and union, Venn diagrams and problem solving with Venn diagrams.
Fractions, operation with fractions, Decimal numbers, rational numbers and irrational numbers.

Term 2

Number and Algebra

Algebraic notations, collecting like terms, product and quotient simplifications, generalising arithmetic, Algebraic substitutions, linear equations, and solving equations.
Expressing quantity as a percentage of another, finding a percentage of a quantity, percentage increase or decrease, finding a percentage change and business applications of percentages.

Index laws, simplifying and factorisation of algebraic expressions, brackets with negative coefficients.

Term 3

Measurement and Geometry

Measuring the length, perimeter, circumference, and area of different shapes, volume.
Understanding the relationship between units. Converting units of measurement of capacity and Time.

Term 4

Statistics and Probability

Dealing with the chances or likelihood of an event taking place using sample space, theoretical and experimental probabilities from tabled data or Venn diagram.
Categorical / numerical data.

Assessment Methods

  • Chapter quizzes
  • End of Term Exams
  • Ongoing class work / homework assessment

Year 9

Aims & Objectives for 2018

To enable students to:

  • Solve problems involving simple interest, interpret ratio and scale, factors, explain similarity of triangles and recognise the connections between similarity and the trigonometric ratios.
  • Able to compare techniques for collecting data from primary and secondary sources, make sense of the position of the mean and median in skewed, symmetric and bi-modal displays to describe and interpret data.
  • Be able to apply the index laws to numbers and express numbers in scientific notation, expand binomial expressions, find the distance between two points on the Cartesian plane and the gradient and midpoint of a line segment. They sketch linear and non-linear relations.
  • Be able to use Pythagoras’ Theorem and trigonometry to find unknown sides of right-angled triangles.
  • Calculate relative frequencies to estimate probabilities, list outcomes for two-step experiments and assign probabilities for those outcomes. They construct histograms and back-to-back stem-and-leaf plots.

Term 1

Number and Algebra

Extend and apply the index laws to variables, the distributive law to the expansion of algebraic expressions, including binomials, and collect like terms where appropriate and index laws to numerical expressions with integer indices.

Term 2

Number and Algebra
  • Express numbers in scientific notation, and solve problems involving simple interest
  • Factorise algebraic expressions by taking out a common algebraic factor and simplify algebraic products and quotients using index laws
  • Apply the four operations to simple algebraic fractions with numerical denominators, and expand binomial products and factorise monic quadratic expressions using a variety of strategies
  • Substitute values into formulas to determine an unknown

Term 3

Measurement and Geometry

Measuring the length, perimeter, area formulae and area of composite figuress.
Measuring and calculating surface area of solids, volume capacity and time.
Coordinate geometry.

Term 4

Statistics and Probability

Types of data, discrete and numerical data, measuring the centre and spread of the data set and data collection. Experimental probability from tabled data, life tables, sample space, theoretical probability, using two dimensional grids

Assessment Methods

  • Chapter quizzes
  • End of Term Exams
  • Ongoing class work / homework assessment

Year 10

Aims & Objectives for 2018

The proficiency strands understanding, fluency, problem-solving and reasoning are an integral part of mathematics content across the three content strands: number and algebra, measurement and geometry, and statistics and probability. The proficiencies reinforce the significance of working mathematically within the content and describe how the content is explored or developed. They provide the language to build in the developmental aspects of the learning of mathematics. The achievement standards reflect the content and encompass the proficiencies.
At this year level:
understanding includes applying the four operations to algebraic fractions, finding unknowns in formulas after substitution, making the connection between equations of relations and their graphs, comparing simple and compound interest in financial contexts and determining probabilities of two- and three-step experiments fluency includes factorising and expanding algebraic expressions, using a range of strategies to solve equations and using calculations to investigate the shape of data sets problem-solving includes calculating the surface area and volume of a diverse range of prisms to solve practical problems, finding unknown lengths and angles using applications of trigonometry, using algebraic and graphical techniques to find solutions to simultaneous equations and inequalities and investigating independence of events reasoning includes formulating geometric proofs involving congruence and similarity, interpreting and evaluating media statements and interpreting and comparing data sets.

Term 1

Factorise algebraic expressions by taking out a common algebraic factor (ACMNA230)
Simplify algebraic products and quotients using index laws (ACMNA231)
Apply the four operations to simple algebraic fractions with numerical denominators (ACMNA232)
Expand binomial products and factorise monic quadratic expressions using a variety of strategies (ACMNA233)
Substitute values into formulas to determine an unknown (ACMNA234)
Connect the compound interest formula to repeated applications of simple interest using appropriate digital technologies (ACMNA229)

Term 2

Substitute values into formulas to determine an unknown (ACMNA234)
Solve problems involving linear equations, including those derived from formulas (ACMNA235)
Solve linear inequalities and graph their solutions on a number line (ACMNA236)
Solve right-angled triangle problems including those involving direction and angles of elevation and depression (ACMMG245)

Term 3

Solve problems involving surface area and volume for a range of prisms, cylinders and composite solids (ACMMG242)
Formulate proofs involving congruent triangles and angle properties (ACMMG243)
Apply logical reasoning, including the use of congruence and similarity, to proofs and numerical exercises involving plane shapes (ACMMG244)
Solve simple quadratic equations using a range of strategies (ACMNA241)

Term 4

Describe the results of two- and three-step chance experiments, both with and without replacements, assign probabilities to outcomes and determine probabilities of events. Investigate the concept of independence (ACMSP246)
Use the language of ‘if ….then, ‘given’, ‘of’, ‘knowing that’ to investigate conditional statements and identify common mistakes in interpreting such language (ACMSP247)
Determine quartiles and interquartile range (ACMSP248)
Construct and interpret box plots and use them to compare data sets (ACMSP249)
Compare shapes of box plots to corresponding histograms and dot plots (ACMSP250)
Use scatter plots to investigate and comment on relationships between two numerical variables (ACMSP251)
Investigate and describe bivariate numerical data where the independent variable is time (ACMSP252)
Evaluate statistical reports in the media and other places by linking claims to displays, statistics and representative data (ACMSP253)

Assessment Methods

  • Class Tests
  • Class Exercises
  • Homework

Year 11

Aims & Objectives for 2018

Mathematics at Stage 1 builds on the mathematical knowledge, understanding, and skills that students have developed in Number and Algebra, Measurement and Geometry, and Statistics and Probability during Year 10. Stage 1 Mathematics is organised into topics that broaden students’ mathematical experience, and provide a variety of contexts for incorporating mathematical arguments and problem-solving. The topics provide a blending of algebraic and geometric thinking. In this subject there is a progression of content, applications, and level of sophistication and abstraction.

Term 1

Investing and Borrowing

Students discuss reasons for investing money and investigate using financial institutions and the share market as vehicles for investment of a sum of money. They calculate their expected returns from simple and compound interest investments using electronic technology (such as spreadsheets and financial packages in graphic calculators) and examine the effects of changing interest rates, terms, and investment balances. Students make comparisons between various scenarios and considerations of the limitations on the reliability of predictions made using simple and compound interest models.
Share market calculations include the costs of buying and returns from selling shares, break-even prices, and returns from dividends. Students make comparisons between the returns possible from share investments and those made in financial institutions. The effects of taxation and inflation on the return from a lump sum investment are investigated to determine whether real growth has occurred. Students consider the costs of borrowing money using credit or a personal loan, by accessing calculation tools on the internet.

Measurement

Students apply measurement techniques such as estimation, units of measurement, scientific notation, and measuring devices, and consider their accuracy. They extend their understanding of Pythagoras’ theorem and use formulae to calculate the perimeter, area, and volume of standard plane and solid shapes, including triangles, quadrilaterals, circles, ellipses, prisms, pyramids, cylinders, cones, and spheres. This study is extended to compounds of these shapes. The estimation of irregular areas and volumes is considered by approximation using simple regular shapes or by applying Simpson’s rule.

Term 2

Measurement (continued)

Students examine scales as they apply in practical contexts such as reading and making maps, plans, or models. Problems set in familiar contexts are used to develop students’ understanding of the concept of rates as changes in related measurements, for example flow rates, density, or unit pricing.

Statistical investigation

This topic begins with consideration of the structure of the process of statistical investigation from the collection of data using various methods of sampling. It proceeds to analysis using measures of central location and spread, to the formation of conjectures and the drawing of conclusions based on that analysis.
In sampling, there is emphasis on the importance of eliminating bias as well as ensuring the validity and reliability of results. Analysis of data incorporates its representation in tabular and graphical form (stem-and-leaf plots, box-and-whisker diagrams, and histograms) and the calculation of summary statistics from the sample.
Students learn to form conjectures that are supported or refuted by a logical argument, using justification from the results of their analysis. The suitability of the statistical tools and measures used in the solution of the problems is emphasised throughout this topic. Electronic technology is used to aid in the statistical investigation process

Term 3

To be advised

Term 4

To be advised

Assessment Methods

  • Skills and Applications Task
  • Mathematical Investigation

Year 11

Aims & Objectives for 2018

In this subject, students are expected to:

  1. Apply science inquiry skills to design and conduct physics investigations, using appropriate procedures and safe, ethical working practices
  2. Obtain, record, represent, analyse, and interpret the results of physics investigations
  3. Evaluate procedures and results, and analyse evidence to formulate and justify conclusions
  4. Develop and apply knowledge and understanding of physics concepts in new and familiar contexts
  5. Explore and understand science as a human endeavour
  6. Communicate knowledge and understanding of physics concepts, using appropriate terms, conventions, and representations.

Term 1

Linear Motion and Forces

In this topic, students acquire the skills and understanding to describe and explain motion in a variety of formats, including algebraic and graphical representations. They use the equations of motion and various graphical methods to elicit quantitative and qualitative information about moving objects that undergo constant acceleration and hence further build their literacy and numeracy skills.
Following the study of motion under constant acceleration, students consolidate their understanding of forces and the effect that forces have on the motion of objects, using Newton’s Laws of Motion.
Throughout this topic, the importance of the concepts and laws in explaining physical phenomena is emphasised and their role in providing a foundation for contemporary applications is also highlighted. Students explore the limitations of the models and ways in which concepts can inform and explain existing, developing, and emerging technologies.
Critical thinking and an understanding of linear motion and forces enable students to devise solutions and make reasonable predictions.

Term 2

Electric circuits

This topic extends students’ knowledge and understanding of the concepts of circuit electricity. It explores the concept of electric charge and the requirements for electric current and introduces the concepts of potential difference, current, resistance, electric power, and efficiency. These concepts are applied to direct current (DC) electric circuits and form the essential understanding for Stage 2, Topic 2: Electricity and magnetism when discussing the production of magnetic fields and the generation and transmission of electricity.
Students extend their numeracy skills when problem solving in this topic, and their personal and social capability is fostered by considering electrical safety devices and the impact of electrical energy use on the local and global environment.

Term 3

To be advised

Term 4

To be advised

Assessment Methods

  • Skills and Applications Task
  • Practical Investigation
  • Science as Human Endeavour Task

Year 7

Aims & Objectives for 2018

In Year 7, students explore the diversity of life on Earth and continue to develop their understanding of the role of classification in ordering and organising information. They use and develop models such as food chains, food webs and the water cycle to represent and analyse the flow of energy and matter through ecosystems and explore the impact of changing components within these systems. They consider the interaction between multiple forces when explaining changes in an object’s motion. They explore the notion of renewable and non-renewable resources and consider how this classification depends on the timescale considered. They investigate relationships in the Earth-sun-moon system and use models to predict and explain events. Students make accurate measurements and control variables to analyse relationships between system components. They explore and explain these relationships through appropriate representations and consider the role of science in decision making processes.

Term 1

Strand: General
Topic: Scientific Data and Safety
Content Descriptors:
Reflect on scientific investigations including evaluating the quality of the data collected, and identifying improvements (ACSIS131)
Use scientific knowledge and findings from investigations to evaluate claims based on evidence (ACSIS132)
Measure and control variables, select equipment appropriate to the task and collect data with accuracy (ACSIS126)

Strand: chemistry
Topic: Separating Mixtures
Content Descriptors:
Mixtures, including solutions, contain a combination of pure substances that can be separated using a range of techniques (ACSSU113)

Term 2

Strand: Physics
Topic: Forces and Machines
Content Descriptors:
Change to an object’s motion is caused by unbalanced forces, including Earth’s gravitational attraction, acting on the object (ACSSU117)

Term 3

Strand: Biology

Topic: Classification
Content Descriptors:
Classification helps organise the diverse group of organisms (ACSSU111)

Topic: Ecosystems
Content Descriptors:
Interactions between organisms, including the effects of human activities can be represented by food chains and food webs (ACSSU112)

Term 4

Strand: Earth & Space Science

Topic: Solar system
Content Descriptors:
Predictable phenomena on Earth, including seasons and eclipses, are caused by the relative positions of the sun, Earth and the moon (ACSSU115)

Strand: Earth Science
Topic: renewable resources
Content Descriptors:
Some of Earth’s resources are renewable, including water that cycles through the environment, but others are non-renewable (ACSSU116)

Assessment Methods

  • Tests
  • Peer Presentations
  • Online interactive simulations
  • Practical Laboratory Work
  • Written Tasks
  • Practical Reports
  • 3D Models
  • Inquiry Tasks

Year 8

Aims & Objectives for 2018

In Year 8, students are introduced to cells as microscopic structures that explain macroscopic properties of living systems. They link form and function at a cellular level and explore the organisation of body systems in terms of flows of matter between interdependent organs. Similarly, they explore changes in matter at a particle level, and distinguish between chemical and physical change. They begin to classify different forms of energy, and describe the role of energy in causing change in systems, including the role of heat and kinetic energy in the rock cycle. Students use experimentation to isolate relationships between components in systems and explain these relationships through increasingly complex representations. They make predictions and propose explanations, drawing on evidence to support their views while considering other points of view.

Term 1

Strand: General
Topic: Scientific Data and Safety
Content Descriptors:
Scientific knowledge has changed peoples’ understanding of the world and is refined as new evidence becomes available (ACSHE134)

Strand: Chemistry
Topic: Chemical science
Content Descriptors:
Properties of the different states of matter can be explained in terms of the motion and arrangement of particles (ACSSU151)
Differences between elements, compounds and mixtures can be described at a particle level (ACSSU152)
Chemical change involves substances reacting to form new substances (ACSSU225)

Term 2

Strand: Biology
Topic: function and structure of Animal and Plant Cells. Body systems.
Content Descriptors:
Cells are the basic units of living things; they have specialised structures and functions (ACSSU149)
Multi-cellular organisms contain systems of organs carrying out specialised functions that enable them to survive and reproduce (ACSSU150)
Multi-cellular organisms rely on coordinated and interdependent internal systems to respond to changes to their environment (ACSSU175)

Term 3

Strand: Physics
Topic: Energy
Content Descriptors:
Energy appears in different forms, including movement (kinetic energy), heat and potential energy, and energy transformations and transfers cause change within systems (ACSSU155)

Term 4

Strand: Earth Science
Topic: Rocks and mining (indigenous heritage). Layers of the Earth
Content Descriptors:
Sedimentary, igneous and metamorphic rocks contain minerals and are formed by processes that occur within Earth over a variety of timescales(ACSSU153)

Assessment Methods

  • Tests
  • Peer Presentations
  • Online interactive simulations
  • Practical Laboratory Work
  • Written Tasks
  • Practical Reports
  • 3D Models
  • Inquiry Tasks

Year 9

Aims & Objectives for 2018

In Year 9, students consider the operation of systems at a range of scales. They explore ways in which the human body as a system responds to its external environment and the interdependencies between biotic and abiotic components of ecosystems. They are introduced to the notion of the atom as a system of protons, electrons and neutrons, and how this system can change through nuclear decay. They learn that matter can be rearranged through chemical change and that these changes play an important role in many systems. They are introduced to the concept of the conservation of matter and begin to develop a more sophisticated view of energy transfer. They begin to apply their understanding of energy and forces to global systems such as continental movement.

Term 1

Strand: General
Topic: Nature and development of science
Content Descriptors:

Scientific understanding, including models and theories, is contestable and is refined over time through a process of review by the scientific community(ACSHE157)
Advances in scientific understanding often rely on developments in technology and technological advances are often linked to scientific discoveries(ACSHE158)

Strand: Chemistry
Topic: Chemical science introduction, theories, atoms and chemical reactions
Content Descriptors:

All matter is made of atoms that are composed of protons, neutrons and electrons; natural radioactivity arises from the decay of nuclei in atoms(ACSSU177)
Chemical reactions involve rearranging atoms to form new substances; during a chemical reaction mass is not created or destroyed (ACSSU178)
Chemical reactions, including combustion and the reactions of acids, are important in both non-living and living systems and involve energy transfer(ACSSU179)

Term 2

Strand: Biology

Topic: Ecosystems

Content Descriptors:
Ecosystems consist of communities of interdependent organisms and abiotic components of the environment; matter and energy flow through these systems (ACSSU176)

Strand: Biology

Topic: Systems working together (animals and plants)

Content Descriptors:
Multi-cellular organisms rely on coordinated and interdependent internal systems to respond to changes to their environment (ACSSU175)

Term 3

Strand: Earth Science

Topic: Earth, seafloor spreading, volcanic and earthquake phenomenon
Content Descriptors:
The theory of plate tectonics explains global patterns of geological activity and continental movement (ACSSU180)

Term 4

Strand: Physics
Topic: Energy around us
Content Descriptors:
Energy transfer through different mediums can be explained using wave and particle models (ACSSU182)

Assessment Methods

  • Tests
  • Peer Presentations
  • Online interactive simulations
  • Practical Laboratory Work
  • Written Tasks
  • Practical Reports
  • 3D Models
  • Inquiry Tasks

Year 10

Aims & Objectives for 2018

To enable students to explore the biological, chemical, geological and physical evidence for different theories, such as the theories of natural selection and the Big Bang. To develop their understanding of atomic theory to understand relationships within the periodic table, understand that motion and forces are related by applying physical laws. To learn about the relationships between aspects of the living, physical and chemical world that are applied to systems on a local and global scale and this enables them to predict how changes will affect equilibrium within these systems. Formulate questions or hypotheses that can be investigated scientifically plan, select and use appropriate investigation types, including field work and laboratory experimentation, to collect reliable data; assess risk and address ethical issues associated with these methods.

Term 1

Biological Science

Topic: Building Blocks of life – DNA and Genetics
Content Descriptors:
Transmission of heritable characteristics from one generation to the next involves DNA and genes
The theory of evolution by natural selection explains the diversity of living things and is supported by a range of scientific evidence

Term 2

Physical Sciences

Topic: Motion and Energy
Content Descriptors:
Energy conservation in a system can be explained by describing energy transfers and transformations (ACSSU190)
The motion of objects can be described and predicted using the laws of physics (ACSSU229)

Term 3

Chemical Sciences

Topic: Elements & Chemical reactions
Content Descriptors:
The atomic structure and properties of elements are used to organise them in the Periodic Table
Different types of chemical reactions are used to produce a range of products and can occur at different rates.

Term 4

Earth and Spaces Sciences

Topic: The Earth we live in
Content Descriptors:
The universe contains features including galaxies, stars and solar systems, and the Big Bang theory can be used to explain the origin of the universe
Global systems, including the carbon cycle, rely on interactions involving the biosphere, lithosphere, hydrosphere and atmosphere.

Assessment Methods

  • Practical Reports
  • Research assignments
  • Tests
  • Exams and ongoing class work/ home work assessments

Year 7 & 8

Aims & Objectives for 2018

By the end of Year 8, students identify and analyse how other artists use visual conventions and viewpoints to communicate ideas and apply this knowledge in their art making. They explain how an artwork is displayed to enhance its meaning. They evaluate how they and others are influenced by artworks from different cultures, times and places.

Students plan their art making in response to exploration of techniques and processes used in their own and others’ artworks. They demonstrate use of visual conventions, techniques and processes to communicate meaning in their artworks.

Term 1

Introduction to ‘ISLAMIC ART’. Students will learn how much of Islamic Art is derived from geometric shapes. They will observe examples and reflect on their understanding.

Introduction to ‘scaling’. Students will learn the concept of scaling and how to apply it to reproducing artworks accurately.

Introduction to ‘Perspective’. Students will be introduced to single point and 2 point perspective.

Term 2

  • Introduction to Aboriginal Art.
  • Exploring Sculpture.
  • Introduction to ‘Impressionism’.

Term 3

Introduction to ‘engineering drawing’. Students will learn the concept of ‘engineering based’ graphical representation.
Students will learn the concept of ‘engineering based’ graphical representation. This will help to equip them with the knowledge that is complimentary to the project that they will be completing in Design and Technology. (To include Isometric and orthographic techniques).

Term 4

Introducing students to logos and their effect in business. Students begin the planning a personalized logo. They will begin to investigate and evaluate some inspirational graphical techniques.

Introduction to ‘digital art’. Students will use digital technology and software to investigate how the digital age has affected the production of artwork.

Assessment Methods

Evidence of Learning: (may include major formative learning tasks, rubrics, formal and informal feedback, student self-assessment, anecdotal notes, observations).

Students will keep an ‘Art Journal’ to reflect on their learning.

Feedback: (What sort of feedback will students receive?)
Ongoing constructive feedback and encouragement.

Self-assessment: (How will students reflect upon and self-assess their learning?)
Students will display work and self and peer critique.

Year 9 & 10

Aims & Objectives for 2018

By the end of Year 10, students evaluate how representations communicate artistic intentions in artworks they make and view. They evaluate artworks and displays from different cultures, times and places. They analyse connections between visual conventions, practices and viewpoints that represent their own and others’ ideas. They identify influences of other artists on their own artworks.
Students manipulate materials, techniques and processes to develop and refine techniques and processes to represent ideas and subject matter in their artworks.
Students plan their art making in response to exploration of techniques and processes used in their own and others’ artworks. They demonstrate use of visual conventions, techniques and processes to communicate meaning in their artworks .
They use historical and conceptual explanations to critically reflect on the contribution of visual arts practitioners as they make and respond to visual artworks.
Build on their experience from the previous band to develop their understanding of the roles of artists and audiences.

Term 1

Introduction to ‘ISLAMIC ART’. Students will learn how much of Islamic Art is derived from geometric shapes. They will observe examples and reflect on their understanding.

Introduction to ‘scaling’. Students will learn the concept of scaling and how to apply it to reproducing artworks accurately.

Introduction to ‘Perspective’. Students will be introduced to single point and 2 point perspective.

Term 2

  • Introduction to Aboriginal Art.
  • Exploring Sculpture.
  • Introduction to ‘Impressionism’.

Term 3

Introduction to ‘engineering drawing’. Students will learn the concept of ‘engineering based’ graphical representation.
Students will learn the concept of ‘engineering based’ graphical representation. This will help to equip them with the knowledge that is complimentary to the project that they will be completing in Design and Technology. (To include Isometric and orthographic techniques).

Term 4

Introducing students to logos and their effect in business. Students begin the planning a personalized logo. They will begin to investigate and evaluate some inspirational graphical techniques.

Introduction to ‘digital art’. Students will use digital technology and software to investigate how the digital age has affected the production of artwork.

Assessment Methods

Evidence of Learning: (may include major formative learning tasks, rubrics, formal and informal feedback, student self-assessment, anecdotal notes, observations).

Students will keep an ‘Art Journal’ to reflect on their learning.

Feedback: (What sort of feedback will students receive?)
Ongoing constructive feedback and encouragement.

Self-assessment: (How will students reflect upon and self-assess their learning?)
Students will display work and self and peer critique.

Year 7

Aims & Objectives for 2018

Students explain the role of groups and the significance of particular individuals in past societies. They suggest reasons for continuity and change over time. They describe the effects of change on societies, individuals and groups and describe events and developments from the perspective of people who lived at the time. They identify past events and developments that have been interpreted in different ways. Students describe geographical processes that influence the characteristics of places. They explain interconnections between people and places and people and environments, describing how these interconnections change places and environments. Students identify the ideas, values and principles that underpin the institutions and processes in Australia’s political and legal systems. They explain the diverse nature of Australian society, and identify the importance of shared values in contemporary Australian society. Students describe the interdependence of consumers and producers in the market and identify factors and strategies that contribute to the financial success of businesses and individuals. They identify why individuals choose to work and the various sources of income that exist. Students recognise that people have different perceptions of places, events and issues and explain how this and other factors influence views on how to respond to an issue or challenge.

Term 1

  • What are resources, where do we find them and why are they important?
  • Renewable and non-renewable energies
  • Water in the world and in Australia
  • Hazards and disasters

Term 2

  • What is place?
  • Why do people live in certain places?
  • Push and pull factors
  • Living in urban, rural and remote areas
  • Cities of the world
  • Liveability and sustainability: Are they compatible?
  • Sustainable Development Goals

Term 3

  • Historians, archaeologists and the ancient past
  • Investigating an ancient mystery: the Olmec
  • The ancient past before farming
  • The ancient past since farming
  • Ancient Egypt

Term 4

  • Ancient Greece
  • Ancient Rome
  • Ancient China
  • Ancient India

Assessment Methods

Students will be assessed via:

  • Written Essays
  • Research tasks
  • Oral presentations
  • Summative and formative assessments
  • Collaborative tasks (group work etc.)
  • Student centred learning tasks

Year 8

Aims & Objectives for 2018

History

Students recognise and explain patterns of change and continuity over time. They explain the causes and effects of events and developments. They identify the motives and actions of people at the time. Students explain the significance of individuals and groups and how they were influenced by the beliefs and values of their society. They describe different interpretations of the past.
Students sequence events and developments within a chronological framework with reference to periods of time. When researching, students develop questions to frame a historical inquiry. They analyse, select and organise information from primary and secondary sources and use it as evidence to answer inquiry questions. Students identify and explain different points of view in sources. When interpreting sources, they identify their origin and purpose, and distinguish between fact and opinion. Students develop texts, particularly descriptions and explanations, incorporating analysis. In developing these texts, and organising and presenting their findings, they use historical terms and concepts, evidence identified in sources, and acknowledge their sources of information.

Geography

Students explain geographical processes that influence the characteristics of places and explain how places are perceived and valued differently. They explain interconnections within environments and between people and places and explain how they change places and environments. They compare alternative strategies to a geographical challenge, taking into account environmental, economic and social factors.
Students identify geographically significant questions from observations to frame an inquiry. They evaluate a range of primary and secondary sources to locate useful and reliable information and data. They select, record and represent data and the location and distribution of geographical phenomena in a range of appropriate digital and non-digital forms, including maps at different scales that conform to cartographic conventions. They analyse geographical maps, data and other information to propose explanations for spatial distributions, patterns, trends and relationships, and draw reasoned conclusions. Students present findings, arguments and ideas using relevant geographical terminology and digital technologies in a range of appropriate communication forms. They propose action in response to a geographical challenge, taking account of environmental, economic and social factors, and predict the outcomes of their proposal.

Term 1

  • Landforms and landscapes around the world and in Australia
  • Processes that shape our planet
  • The importance of landscapes to different cultures
  • How do we look after our planet?
  • Natural disasters now and in the future

Term 2

  • Where do most Australians live?
  • Where have Australians lived in the past?
  • Urbanisation
  • What is migration and why are people on the move?
  • Where are the worlds cities?
  • Megacities
  • How are cities designed to be sustainable?
  • Urbanisation impacts and problems
  • Slums
  • Australian cities compared to others around the world
  • Planning Australia’s urban future

Term 3

  • The world in change (650 – 1400)
  • A world of expanding contacts (1400 – 1750)
  • The Vikings (790 – 1066)
  • Medieval Europe (590 – 1500)
  • The Ottoman Empire (1299 – 1683)
  • Renaissance Italy (1400 – 1600)

Term 4

  • Angkor and the Khmer Empire (802 – 1431)
  • Japan under the shoguns (794 – 1867)
  • Polynesian expansions across the Pacific (700 – 1756)
  • Mongol expansion (1206 – 1368)
  • The Black Death – a 14th century plague
  • The Spanish conquest of the Americas (1492 – 1572)

Assessment Methods

Students will be assessed via:

  • Written Essays
  • Research tasks
  • Oral presentations
  • Summative and formative assessments
  • Collaborative tasks (group work etc.)
  • Student centred learning tasks

Year 9

Aims & Objectives for 2018

History

Students refer to key events and the actions of individuals and groups to explain patterns of change and continuity over time. They analyse the causes and effects of events and developments and make judgments about their importance. They explain the motives and actions of people at the time. Students explain the significance of these events and developments over the short and long term. They explain different interpretations of the past.
Students sequence events and developments within a chronological framework, with reference to periods of time and their duration. When researching, students develop different kinds of questions to frame a historical inquiry. They interpret, process, analyse and organise information from a range of primary and secondary sources and use it as evidence to answer inquiry questions. Students examine sources to compare different points of view. When evaluating these sources, they analyse origin and purpose, and draw conclusions about their usefulness. They develop their own interpretations about the past. Students develop texts, particularly explanations and discussions, incorporating historical interpretations. In developing these texts and organising and presenting their conclusions, they use historical terms and concepts, evidence identified in sources, and they reference these sources.

Geography

Students explain how geographical processes change the characteristics of places. They analyse interconnections between people, places and environments and explain how these interconnections influence people, and change places and environments. They predict changes in the characteristics of places over time and identify the possible implications of change for the future. Students analyse alternative strategies to a geographical challenge using environmental, social and economic criteria.
Students use initial research to identify geographically significant questions to frame an inquiry. They evaluate a range of primary and secondary sources to select and collect relevant and reliable geographical information and data. They record and represent multi-variable data in a range of appropriate digital and non-digital forms, including a range of maps that comply with cartographic conventions. They use a range of methods and digital technologies to interpret and analyse maps, data and other information to propose explanations for patterns, trends, relationships and anomalies across time and space, and to predict outcomes. Students synthesise data and information to draw reasoned conclusions. They present findings, arguments and explanations using relevant geographical terminology and digital representations in a range of appropriate communication forms. Students propose action in response to a geographical challenge, taking account of environmental, economic and social factors, and predict the outcomes and consequences of their proposal.

Term 1

  • What is a biome?
  • Different biomes around the world
  • Major biomes in Australia
  • The Great Barrier Reef
  • Different forms of agriculture
  • Do we have enough food for the future?
  • Impacts of agriculture on our biomes
  • Biodiversity
  • Irrigation: Positives and negatives

Term 2

  • How do people connect with places?
  • How do people see places?
  • Liveability and poverty
  • Tourism: What is it and why is it happening?
  • Impacts of tourism
  • Globalisation
  • Trade and foreign aid
  • Technology and communication

Term 3

  • The modern world and Australia (1750 – 1918)
  • The Industrial Revolution (1750 – 1914): Technology and progress
  • The Industrial Revolution (1750 – 1914): The impact on people
  • Movement of peoples (1750 – 1901)

Term 4

  • Making a nation – Australia (1750 – 1918): Colonisation and conflict
  • Making a nation – Australia (1750 – 1918): From colonies to nationhood
  • Asia and the world: China (1750 – 1918)
  • World War I (1914 – 1918)

Assessment Methods

Students will be assessed via:

  • Written Essays
  • Research tasks
  • Oral presentations
  • Summative and formative assessments
  • Collaborative tasks (group work etc.)
  • Student centred learning tasks

Year 10

Aims & Objectives for 2018

History

Students refer to key events, the actions of individuals and groups, and beliefs and values to explain patterns of change and continuity over time. They analyse the causes and effects of events and developments and explain their relative importance. They explain the context for people’s actions in the past. Students explain the significance of events and developments from a range of perspectives. They explain different interpretations of the past and recognise the evidence used to support these interpretations.
Students sequence events and developments within a chronological framework, and identify relationships between events across different places and periods of time. When researching, students develop, evaluate and modify questions to frame a historical inquiry. They process, analyse and synthesise information from a range of primary and secondary sources and use it as evidence to answer inquiry questions. Students analyse sources to identify motivations, values and attitudes. When evaluating these sources, they analyse and draw conclusions about their usefulness, taking into account their origin, purpose and context. They develop and justify their own interpretations about the past. Students develop texts, particularly explanations and discussions, incorporating historical argument. In developing these texts and organising and presenting their arguments, they use historical terms and concepts, evidence identified in sources, and they reference these sources.

Geography

Students explain how interactions between geographical processes at different scales change the characteristics of places. Students identify, analyse and explain significant interconnections between people, places and environments and explain changes that result from these interconnections and their consequences. They predict changes in the characteristics of places and environments over time, across space and at different scales and explain the predicted consequences of change. They evaluate alternative views on a geographical challenge and alternative strategies to address this challenge using environmental, economic, political and social criteria and draw a reasoned conclusion.
Students use initial research to develop and modify geographically significant questions to frame an inquiry. They critically evaluate a range of primary and secondary sources to select and collect relevant, reliable and unbiased geographical information and data. Students record and represent multi-variable data in of the most appropriate digital and non-digital forms, including a range of graphs and maps that use suitable scales and comply with cartographic conventions. They use a range of methods and digital technologies to interpret and analyse maps, data and other information to make generalisations and inferences, propose explanations for significant patterns, trends, relationships and anomalies across time and space and at different scales, and predict outcomes. They analyse and synthesise data and other information to draw reasoned conclusions, taking into account alternative perspectives. Students present findings, arguments and explanations using relevant geographical terminology and graphic representations and digital technologies in a range of selected and appropriate communication forms. They evaluate their findings and propose action in response to a contemporary geographical challenge, taking account of environmental, economic, political and social considerations. They explain the predicted outcomes and consequences of their proposal.

Civics and Citizenship

Students compare and evaluate the key features and values of systems of government, and analyse the Australian Government’s global roles and responsibilities. They analyse the role of the High Court and explain how Australia’s international legal obligations influence law and government policy. Students evaluate a range of factors that sustain democratic societies.
When researching, students evaluate a range of questions to investigate Australia’s political and legal systems and critically analyse information gathered from different sources for relevance, reliability and omission. They account for and evaluate different interpretations and points of view on civics and citizenship issues. When planning for action, students take account of multiple perspectives and ambiguities, use democratic processes, and negotiate solutions to an issue. Students develop and present evidenced-based arguments incorporating different points of view on civics and citizenship issues. They use appropriate texts, subject-specific language and concepts. They evaluate ways they can be active and informed citizens in different contexts.

Economics and business

Students explain why and how governments manage economic performance to improve living standards. They give explanations for variations in economic performance and standards of living within and between economies. They analyse factors that influence major consumer and financial decisions and explain the short- and long-term effects of these decisions. They explain how businesses respond to changing economic conditions and improve productivity. Students evaluate the effect of organisational and workforce management on business performance.
When researching, students develop questions and formulate hypotheses to frame an investigation of an economic or business issue or event. They gather and analyse reliable data and information from different sources to identify trends, explain relationships and make predictions. Students generate alternative responses to an issue, taking into account multiple perspectives. They use cost-benefit analysis and appropriate criteria to propose and justify a course of action. They apply economics and business knowledge, skills and concepts to familiar, unfamiliar and complex hypothetical problems. Students develop and present evidence-based conclusions and reasoned arguments incorporating different points of view. They use appropriate texts, subject-specific language, conventions and concepts. They analyse the intended and unintended effects of economic and business decisions and the potential consequences of alternative actions.

Term 1

  • Introduction to environmental change and management
  • What is a population?
  • People and the environment
  • Ecological footprint and biocapacity
  • World inequality
  • Climate change: What is it, what are the impacts and can we do anything about it?
  • Land degradation
  • Invasive species
  • Indigenous management of the land

Term 2

  • Revision of WWI
  • The years after WWI
  • WWII
  • The Cold War
  • Rights and freedoms: What are they and do we all have them?
  • Indigenous Australians and their rights and freedoms
  • Globalisation
  • The environmental movement
  • Australia and migration

Term 3

  • Government and democracy
  • Key values of Australia’s system of government
  • Australian government compared to the Asia region
  • Australia’s role and responsibilities at a global level
  • The United Nations
  • Law and Citizens
  • The role of the High Court

Term 4

  • Australia’s economy
  • Indicators of economic performance
  • Links between economic performance and living standards
  • Government management of economic performance
  • Financial decisions and their consequences
  • Responding to changing economic conditions

Assessment Methods

Students will be assessed via:

  • Written Essays
  • Research tasks
  • Oral presentations
  • Summative and formative assessments
  • Collaborative tasks (group work etc.)
  • Student centred learning tasks

All Year Levels

Aims & Objectives for 2018

The Arabic language program at Garden College is based on the SACSA Framework (South Australian Standards & Accountability Framework) in the primary and middle schools and on SSABSA’s requirements (Senior Secondary Assessment Board of South Australia) in the senior school. It is designed to teach students from diverse linguistic and cultural backgrounds to communicate effectively in Arabic and to better understand the Arabic language and its culture. The program contributes significantly to the objectives of Garden College, which aim to facilitate and enhance students’ appreciation of the teachings of the Holy Quran. A student – centred approach is used in the Arabic classroom. We facilitate students’ interaction with each other and exposes them to spoken and written texts at varying levels of complexity. We help students to develop a level of language proficiency that will allow them to express themselves in Arabic, both through speaking and writing. Thus, a high level of linguistic sophistication gives students the confidence not only to communicate in Arabic, but also to explore and appreciate its culture.

Term 1

  1. Brainstorming of key ideas/vocab
  2. Reading and analysing text
  3. Reading aloud for fluency
  4. Answering questions on text

Term 2

  1. Spelling/dictation
  2. Imitating sentences/structure from model text
  3. Answering questions on text
  4. Reading and analysing text

Term 3

  1. Rearranging the word to form sentences
  2. Reading and analysing text
  3. Listening for information

Term 4

  1. Reconstructing text
  2. Rearranging the word to form sentences
  3. Reading and analysing text
  4. Listening for information

Assessment Methods

Interaction

Most students show an appropriate command of oral language at this level. An interaction assessment task has to give students an opportunity to interact with others to exchange information, ideas, opinions, or experiences

Text Analysis

Tasks included a variety of reading and responding tasks and listening and responding tasks. Most students show an appropriate command of language at this level in both domains, and the ability to extract information and interpret intention of a range of texts.

Oral Examination

Practice is essential in the preparation for an oral examination and students are encouraged to participate in as many opportunities using oral language as possible.

Written Examination

Assessment information for the written examination.

Stage One

Aims & Objectives for 2018

Biology is a 10-credit subject or a 20-credit subject at Stage 1 and a 20-credit subject at Stage 2.
The study of Biology is constructed around inquiry into and application of understanding the diversity of life as it has evolved, the structure and function of living things, and how they interact with their own and other species and their environments.
Students investigate biological systems and their interactions, from the perspectives of energy, control, structure and function, change, and exchange in microscopic cellular structures and processes, through to macroscopic ecosystem dynamics. These investigations allow students to extend the skills, knowledge, and understanding that enable them to explore and explain everyday observations, find solutions to biological issues and problems, and understand how biological science impacts on their lives, society, and the environment. They apply their understanding of the interconnectedness of biological systems to evaluate the impact of human activity on the natural world.
In their study of Biology, students inquire into and explain biological phenomena and draw evidence-based conclusions from their investigations into biology-related issues, developments, and innovations.

Topics for Stage 1 Biology

Semester 1:
Topic 1: Cells and microorganisms
Topic 4: Biodiversity and ecosystem dynamics

Semester 2:
Topic 2: Infectious disease
Topic 3: Multicellular organisms

Performance Standards for 2018

Investigation, Analysis, and Evaluation
The specific features are as follows:
IAE1 Design of a biological investigation.
IAE2 Obtaining, recording, and representation of data, using appropriate conventions and formats.
IAE3 Analysis and interpretation of data and other evidence to formulate and justify conclusions.
IAE4 Evaluation of procedures and their effect on data.

Knowledge and Application
The specific features are as follows:
KA1 Demonstration of knowledge and understanding of biological concepts.
KA2 Development and application of biological concepts in new and familiar contexts.
KA3 Exploration and understanding of the interaction between science and society.
KA4 Communication of knowledge and understanding of biological concepts and information, using appropriate terms, conventions, and representations.

Assessment Methods

Assessment Type 1: Investigations Folio

For a 10-credit subject, students undertake at least one practical investigation and one investigation with a focus on science as a human endeavour. Students may undertake more than one practical investigation within the maximum number of assessments allowed.
For a 20-credit subject, students undertake at least two practical investigations and two investigations with a focus on science as a human endeavour. Students may undertake more than two practical investigations within the maximum number of assessments allowed.
Students inquire into aspects of biology through practical discovery and data analysis, and/or by selecting, analysing, and interpreting information.

Practical Investigations

As students design and safely carry out investigations, they demonstrate their science inquiry skills by:

  • deconstructing a problem to determine the most appropriate method for investigation
  • formulating investigable questions and hypotheses
  • selecting and using appropriate equipment, apparatus, and techniques
  • identifying variables
  • collecting, representing, analysing, and interpreting data
  • evaluating procedures and considering their impact on results
  • drawing conclusions
  • communicating knowledge and understanding of concepts.

Practical investigations can be conducted individually or collaboratively. For each investigation, students present an individual report.
One practical investigation should enable students to deconstruct a problem to investigate a question or hypothesis for which the outcome is uncertain.
One practical investigation should enable students to design their own procedure and provide evidence of how the procedure has been developed. In order to manage the process efficiently, students could individually design investigations and then conduct one of these as a group, or design hypothetical investigations at the end of a practical activity.
A practical report should include:

  • introduction with relevant biological concepts and either a hypothesis and variables or an investigable question
  • materials/apparatus*
  • method/procedure that outlines the steps to be taken*
  • identification and management of safety and/or ethical risks*
  • results*
  • analysis of results, identifying trends, and linking results to concepts
  • evaluation of procedures and data, and identifying sources of uncertainty
  • conclusion, with justification.

The report should be a maximum of 1000 words if written, or a maximum of 6 minutes for an oral presentation, or the equivalent in multimodal form.
A summary sheet outlining the deconstruction process (where applicable) should be attached to the report*. Suggested formats for the summary sheet include flow charts, concept maps, tables, or notes.
*The five asterisked sections of materials/apparatus, method/procedures, risks, results, and deconstruction are excluded from the word count.
Suggested formats for presentation of a practical investigation report include:

  • a written report
  • an oral presentation
  • a multimodal product.
Science as a Human Endeavour Investigation

Students investigate a contemporary example of how science interacts with society. This may focus on one or more of the key concepts of science as a human endeavour described on pages 11 and 12 and may draw on a context suggested in the topics or relate to a new context.
Students could consider, for example, how:

  • humans seek to improve their understanding and explanation of the natural world
  • working scientifically is a way of obtaining knowledge that allows for testing scientific claims
  • scientific theory can change in the light of new evidence
  • technological advances change ways of working scientifically
  • links between advances in science impact and influence society
  • society influences scientific research
  • emerging biology-related careers and pathways involve science.

Students access information from different sources, select relevant information, analyse their findings, explain the connection to science as a human endeavour, and develop and explain their own conclusions from the investigation.
Possible starting points for the investigation could include, for example:

  • the announcement of a discovery in the field of biological science
  • an expert’s point of view on a controversial innovation
  • a TED talk based on a biological development
  • an article from a scientific publication (e.g. Cosmos)
  • public concern about an issue that has environmental, social, economic, or political implications.

The science as a human endeavour investigation should be a maximum of 1000 words if written, or a maximum of 6 minutes for an oral presentation, or the equivalent in multimodal form.
For this assessment type, students provide evidence of their learning in relation to the following assessment design criteria:

  • investigation, analysis, and evaluation
  • knowledge and application.

Assessment Type 2: Skills and Applications Tasks

For a 10-credit subject, students undertake at least one skills and applications task. Students may undertake more than one skills and applications task within the maximum number of assessments allowed, but at least one should be under the direct supervision of the teacher. The supervised setting (e.g. classroom, laboratory, or field) should be appropriate to the task.
For a 20-credit subject, students undertake at least two skills and applications tasks. Students may undertake more than two skills and applications tasks within the maximum number of assessments allowed, but at least two should be under the direct supervision of the teacher. The supervised setting (e.g. classroom, laboratory, or field) should be appropriate to the task.
Skills and applications tasks allow students to provide evidence of their learning in tasks that may:

  • be applied, analytical, and/or interpretative
  • pose problems in new and familiar contexts
  • involve individual or collaborative assessments, depending on task design.

A skills and applications task may involve, for example:

  • solving problems
  • designing an investigation to test a hypothesis or investigable question
  • considering different scenarios in which to apply knowledge and understanding
  • graphing, tabulating, and/or analysing data
  • evaluating procedures and identifying their limitations
  • formulating and justifying conclusions
  • representing information diagrammatically or graphically
  • using biological terms, conventions, and notations.

As a set, skills and applications tasks should be designed to enable students to apply their science inquiry skills, demonstrate knowledge and understanding of key biological concepts and learning, and explain connections with science as a human endeavour. Problems and scenarios should be set in a relevant context, which may be practical, social, or environmental.
Skills and applications tasks may include, for example:

  • modelling or representing concepts
  • developing simulations
  • practical and/or graphical skills
  • a multimodal product
  • an oral presentation
  • participation in a debate
  • an extended response
  • responses to short-answer questions
  • a structured interview
  • an excursion report
  • a response to science in the media.

For this assessment type, students provide evidence of their learning in relation to the following assessment design criteria:

  • investigation, analysis, and evaluation
  • knowledge and application.

Stage One

Aims & Objectives for 2018

Chemistry is a 10-credit subject or a 20-credit subject at Stage 1 and a 20-credit subject at Stage 2.
In their study of Chemistry, students develop and extend their understanding of how the physical world is chemically constructed, the interaction between human activities and the environment, and the use that human beings make of the planet’s resources. They explore examples of how scientific understanding is dynamic and develops with new evidence, which may involve the application of new technologies.
Students consider examples of benefits and risks of chemical knowledge to the wider community, along with the capacity of chemical knowledge to inform public debate on social and environmental issues. The study of Chemistry helps students to make informed decisions about interacting with and modifying nature, and explore options such as green or sustainable chemistry, which seeks to reduce the environmental impact of chemical products and processes.
Through the study of Chemistry, students develop the skills that enable them to be questioning, reflective, and critical thinkers; investigate and explain phenomena around them; and explore strategies and possible solutions to address major challenges now and in the future (for example, in energy use, global food supply, and sustainable food production).
Students integrate and apply a range of understanding, inquiry, and scientific thinking skills that encourage and inspire them to contribute their own solutions to current and future problems and challenges, and pursue future pathways, including in medical or pharmaceutical research, pharmacy, chemical engineering, and innovative product design.

Performance Standards for 2018

The performance standards describe five levels of achievement, A to E.
Each level of achievement describes the knowledge, skills and understanding that teachers refer to in deciding how well students have demonstrated their learning on the basis of the evidence provided.

Investigation, Analysis and Evaluation

A.
Designs a logical, coherent, and detailed chemistry investigation.
Obtains, records, and represents data, using appropriate conventions and formats accurately and highly effectively.
Systematically analyses and interprets data and evidence to formulate logical conclusions with detailed justification.
Critically and logically evaluates procedures and discusses their effect on data.

B.
Designs a well-considered and clear chemistry investigation.
Obtains, records, and represents data, using appropriate conventions and formats mostly accurately and effectively.
Logically analyses and interprets data and evidence to formulate suitable conclusions with reasonable justification.
Logically evaluates procedures and their effect on data.

C.
Designs a considered and generally clear chemistry investigation.
Obtains, records, and represents data, using generally appropriate conventions and formats with some errors but generally accurately and effectively.
Undertakes some analysis and interpretation of data and evidence to formulate generally appropriate conclusions with some justification.
Evaluates procedures and some of their effect on data.

D.
Prepares the outline of a chemistry investigation.
Obtains, records, and represents data, using conventions and formats inconsistently, with occasional accuracy and effectiveness.
Describes data and undertakes some basic interpretation to formulate a basic conclusion.
Attempts to evaluate procedures or suggest an effect on data.

E.
Identifies a simple procedure for a chemistry investigation.
Attempts to record and represent some data, with limited accuracy or effectiveness.
Attempts to describe results and/or interpret data to formulate a basic conclusion.
Acknowledges that procedures affect data.

Knowledge and Application

A.
Demonstrates deep and broad knowledge and understanding of a range of chemical concepts.
Develops and applies chemical concepts highly effectively in new and familiar contexts.
Critically explores and understands in depth the interaction between science and society.
Communicates knowledge and understanding of chemistry coherently, with highly effective use of
appropriate terms, conventions, and representations.

B.
Demonstrates some depth and breadth of knowledge and understanding of a range of chemical concepts.
Develops and applies chemical concepts mostly effectively in new and familiar contexts.
Logically explores and understands in some depth the interaction between science and society.
Communicates knowledge and understanding of chemistry mostly coherently, with effective use of
appropriate terms, conventions, and representations.

C.
Demonstrates knowledge and understanding of a general range of chemical concepts.
Develops and applies chemical concepts generally effectively in new or familiar contexts.
Explores and understands aspects of the interaction between science and society.
Communicates knowledge and understanding of chemistry generally effectively, using some
appropriate terms, conventions, and representations.

D.
Demonstrates some basic knowledge and partial understanding of chemical concepts.
Develops and applies some chemical concepts in familiar contexts.
Partially explores and recognises aspects of the interaction between science and society.
Communicates basic chemical information, using some appropriate terms, conventions, and/or
representations.

E.
Demonstrates limited recognition and awareness of chemical concepts.
Attempts to develop and apply chemical concepts in familiar contexts.
Attempts to explore and identify an aspect of the interaction between science and society.
Attempts to communicate information about chemistry.

Assessment Methods

Assessment Type 1: Folio

For the folio, students undertake at least one Chemistry exploration assessment in which they work either individually or in a group to explore, research, and reflect on an idea, question, or issue arising from the study of a topic.
The assessment can take a number of forms, for example:

  • an essay
  • a group presentation
  • a multimedia presentation
  • an oral presentation
  • a report.

Students also undertake a solo practical investigation, during which they must individually design an experimental procedure to investigate the effects of dependent and independent variables. Students must:

  • deconstruct the problem
  • pose a hypothesis
  • identify dependent and independent variables
  • consider factors that should be held constant and explain why and how they will attempt to control these factors
  • identify factors that may not be able to be controlled
  • list materials required
  • devise a procedure to be followed
  • consider how they will display and analyse data
  • identify safety considerations.
  • carry out the procedure and record their results.

Students will write a report that includes:

  • an introduction with relevant chemistry concepts, an hypothesis and variables, or investigable question
  • materials/apparatus, method/procedure outlining and trials and steps to be taken
  • identification and management of safety and/or ethical risks
  • results
  • analysis of results, identifying trends, and linking results to concepts
  • evaluation of procedures and data, identifying sources of uncertainty

Assessment Type 2: Skills and applications task

SAT1.

In this task students:

  • use resources to find information about six substances of a range of structure types
  • explain the information obtained in terms of the structures of the substances
  • design an investigation to determine properties related to the structure and bonding of two unknown white powders
  • use the evidence from their investigation to determine the identity of the two white powders
  • connect the data to concepts and hence formulate a conclusion about the identity of the two white powders
  • answer questions relating structure to uses of substances.

SAT2.
This SAT consists of short-answer questions. will require students to:

  • demonstrate their knowledge and application of the principles of atomic structure, the periodic table, bonding between atoms, the relationship between structure type and the properties and uses of substances, shapes of molecules, secondary interactions, the mole concept and organic compounds.
  • attempt problems of a range of difficulty and complexity
  • attempt problems posed in both familiar and new social contexts
  • demonstrate understanding of the impact of chemistry on society
  • attempt relevant calculations.

Stage One

Aims & Objectives for 2018

Media Studies is a 10-credit subject or a 20-credit subject at Stage 1. It involves reading, viewing, writing, listening, discussing, debating, and interacting. Stage 1 Media Studies also involves creating media products and analysing media. Students create and examine a range of media texts, thus developing their skills and knowledge, and their understanding of media as symbolic systems.
When studying the suggested topics, students should be given opportunities to undertake research, debate issues, produce a range of texts, and present their views in a variety of ways. Students should reflect on their own experiences of media when studying their chosen topics.

Performance Standards for 2018

Knowledge and Understanding

The specific features are as follows:
KU1 Knowledge and understanding of media concepts, issues, and interactions.
KU2 Knowledge and understanding of how audiences influence, and are influenced by, forms and content of media texts.

Research and Analysis

The specific features are as follows:
RA1 Analysis and recognition of different points of view, bias, values, or intent across a range of media texts.
RA2 Research into and analysis of the ways in which groups and individuals are represented in media.
RA3 Analysis of interactions with media.

Producing

The specific features are as follows:
P1 Design and planning of media texts.
P2 Use of appropriate production techniques and technologies.

Communication

The specific features are as follows:
C1 Reproduction of the forms and features of media texts, to convey meaning.
C2 Fluency of expression and use of appropriate media terminology.

Assessment Methods

Assessment Type 1: Folio

For the folio, students undertake at least one media exploration assessment in which they work either individually or in a group to explore, research, and reflect on an idea, question, or issue arising from the study of a topic.
The assessment can take a number of forms, for example:

  • a debate
  • a discussion
  • an essay
  • a group presentation
  • a multimedia presentation
  • an oral presentation
  • a report.

Whether undertaking a media exploration assessment individually or in a group, each student presents an individual response, which should be a maximum of 800 words if written or a maximum of 5 minutes if oral, or the equivalent in multimodal form.
For this assessment type, students provide evidence of their learning primarily in relation to the following assessment design criteria:

  • knowledge and understanding
  • research and analysis
  • communication.

 Assessment Type 2: Interaction Study

Students undertake at least one interaction study on a topic of their choice. Either individually or in a group, students interact with media and analyse their interactions. The topic that students choose should be based on their current or past media experience and their access to a variety of media resources.
For the interaction study, students could, for example, analyse their use and experience of:

  • various interactive games
  • media as they research career options within the media
  • converging media such as mobile phones and the Internet
  • new technologies and ways of adapting and adopting them for work, leisure, and/or educational purposes
  • media in a global context.

Students identify and outline the topic they want to study and then choose the form in which they present their findings. The length and form of the response will vary, depending on the topic and approach chosen.
Whether undertaking an interaction study individually or in a group, each student presents an individual response, which should be a maximum of 800 words if written or a maximum of 5 minutes if oral, or the equivalent in multimodal form.
For this assessment type, students provide evidence of their learning primarily in relation to the following assessment design criteria:

  • knowledge and understanding
  • research and analysis
  • communication.

Assessment Type 3: Product

Students undertake at least one media production task in which they work either individually or in a group to:

  • develop a plan for a production task
  • identify relevant techniques to be used
  • complete a final media product
  • evaluate the final media product.

The final media product represents students’ accumulated understanding of concepts, conventions, and style, as well as the skills they have acquired in using available equipment to create a media product.
Where students decide to complete a media product as a small group, protocols need to be clearly documented and agreed at the beginning of the task. For example, students negotiate with their teacher to have their contribution to the group product assessed individually, or agree that all students in the group will obtain the same assessment.
Video productions should run for a maximum of 5 minutes (except for television advertisements or community service announcements that run for 30, 45, or 60 seconds), and should include appropriate post-production work such as audio, titling, and credits.
Animated video products should run for a maximum of 2 minutes and should contain appropriate post-production work such as audio, titling, and credits.
Radio productions that include music, sound effects, and spoken dialogue should be a maximum of 20 minutes. Radio productions that exclude music should be a maximum of 5 minutes.
A multimedia task is one that involves the use of appropriate hardware devices and the manipulation of relevant software programs with multimedia functions, including static and moving images of digital video, animation, text, interactivity, and sound. Multimedia productions should contain a maximum of ten linked pages or layers. Digital video and animations that are part of a multimedia product should run for approximately 20 seconds.
Up to 30% of each finished product of any format may consist of pre-recorded content from other sources, unless the production is specifically addressing the techniques and styles of emerging genres such as Mashup or Anime Music Videos (AMV). All content from other sources must be acknowledged.
For this assessment type, students provide evidence of their learning primarily in relation to the following assessment design criteria:

  • producing
  • communication

Stage One

Aims & Objectives for 2018

Society and Culture is a 10-credit subject or a 20-credit subject at Stage 1, and a 10-credit subject or a 20-credit subject at Stage 2.
In Society and Culture, students explore and analyse the interactions of people, societies, cultures, and environments. Using an interdisciplinary approach, they analyse the structures and systems of contemporary societies and cultures.
Students learn about the ways in which societies constantly change and are affected by social, political, historical, environmental, economic, and cultural factors. They investigate the ways in which people function in groups and communicate within and across cultural groups. They develop the skills and experience to understand how individual and group involvement can influence change, and to consider the consequences of a range of possible social actions. Through their study of Society and Culture, students develop the ability to influence their own future by acquiring skills, values, and understanding that enable them to participate effectively in contemporary society.
Society and Culture gives students critical insight into the significance of factors such as gender, ethnicity, racism, class, and power structures that affect the lives and identities of individuals and groups. They develop the skills to critically analyse a range of viewpoints about peoples, societies, and issues; understand diversity within and across societies; and extend their awareness of the connections between, and the interdependence of, societies and cultures.
Students use inquiry processes to explore concepts of society and culture in Australian (local and national) and global contexts. They choose and explore a range of primary and secondary sources and evaluate different viewpoints and perspectives. They learn to challenge their own thinking and develop skills in presenting opinions supported by evidence.
Students develop their skills in collaborative and independent thinking and inquiry by investigating the causes and consequences of a broad range of social issues and actions. They communicate informed opinions in a range of ways.
Students have the opportunity to build intercultural understanding by exploring the history, knowledge, and contemporary cultures of different peoples.

Performance Standards for 2018

Knowledge and Understanding

The specific features are as follows:
KU1 Knowledge and understanding of contemporary social and/or cultural issues in Australian and global contexts.
KU2 Understanding of connections between societies and cultures.

Investigation and Analysis

The specific features are as follows:
IA1 Analysis of and reflection on contemporary social or cultural issues.
IA2 Analysis of how and why social change occurs.
IA3 Investigation and analysis of a range of sources and perspectives.

Collaboration

The specific features are as follows:
Cl1 Collaborative investigation of a range of perspectives on a contemporary social or cultural issue.
Cl2 Reflection on learning and sharing of learning with others.

Communication

The specific features are as follows:
Cm1 Communication of informed ideas about social and/or cultural issues and societies.
Cm2 Communication of opinions supported by evidence, with appropriate acknowledgment of sources.

Assessment Methods

Assessment Type 1: Sources Analysis

Students undertake at least one sources analysis assessment for a 10-credit subject, and two to four sources analysis assessments for a 20-credit subject. They identify, investigate, and analyse different sources to gain insight into social or cultural issues or aspects of societies.
Students gather information from primary and/or secondary sources. Primary sources may include observations and recordings from field trips to cultural or social events or centres, a study of cultural artefacts, or interaction with guest speakers and other people in the school or the local community, including other students. Students may undertake activities as individuals, in groups, or as members of a whole class. They record qualitative or quantitative data, using surveys, journals, photographs, or spreadsheets, or other means.
Students investigate and analyse relevant information from the different sources.
Students negotiate with the teacher the form — written, oral, or multimodal — in which to communicate their learning about the social or cultural issue or aspect of society. For example, they could use a classroom discussion, an argument, a forum, a dramatic presentation, a mock parliamentary debate, a symbolic representation, mime and drama, movement and dance, music and song, debates, reports, or interviews to communicate their learning.
A sources analysis assessment should be a maximum of 800 words if written or a maximum of 5 minutes for an oral presentation, or the equivalent in multimodal form.
When students are involved in group activities they need to identify, record, and present evidence of learning individually.
For this assessment type, students provide evidence of their learning primarily in relation to the following assessment design criteria:

  • investigation and analysis
  • communication

Assessment Type 2: Group Activity

Students undertake at least one group activity for a 10-credit subject, and two group activities for a 20-credit subject. They:

  • work collaboratively in a group to define and investigate different perspectives on a contemporary social or cultural issue that is relevant to one or more of the topics studied.
  • reflect on and share their learning with others.

The group could be a pair, or a larger group, of students from the class or a local or virtual community. Students need to have evidence (e.g. notes) of their contribution to the collaboration.
Students reflect on and share their learning with others in a round-table discussion or other method of communication that enables each member of the group to demonstrate his or her contribution.
Each student’s contribution to a group activity should be a maximum of 750 words if written or a maximum of 5 minutes for an oral presentation, or the equivalent in multimodal form.
For this assessment type, students provide evidence of their learning primarily in relation to the following assessment design criteria:

  • knowledge and understanding
  • investigation and analysis
  • collaboration

Assessment Type 3: Investigation

Students undertake at least one investigation for a 10-credit subject, and two investigations for a 20-credit subject. They choose a contemporary social or cultural issue to investigate. They identify and refine guiding questions and investigate, analyse, and use relevant information from different sources, which may include primary sources. Students support their conclusions with evidence from their investigations.
Students may take into account the context of the issue — historical, economic, environmental, or other — or consider how and why social change has affected, or may affect, the issue.
Students negotiate the form of presentation — written, oral, or multimodal — with the teacher. Guiding questions are suggested in the ‘Key Skills of Social Inquiry’ section in Learning Scope and Requirements.
A presentation should be a maximum of 1000 words if written or a maximum of 6 minutes for an oral presentation, or the equivalent in multimodal form.
For this assessment type, students provide evidence of their learning primarily in relation to the following assessment design criteria:

  • knowledge and understanding
  • investigation and analysis
  • communication

SACE Stage 1

Aims & Objectives for 2018

The Personal Learning Plan (PLP) is a compulsory subject at Stage 1, undertaken at Year 10. The PLP helps students to plan for their future and assists them in choosing the subjects they will study in Years 11 and 12.

Students develop their knowledge and understanding of seven capabilities through their learning in the Personal Learning Plan. The seven capabilities are:

  • literacy
  • numeracy
  • information and communication technology capability
  • critical and creative thinking
  • personal and social capability
  • ethical understanding
  • intercultural understanding

Students select and develop one or more capabilities relevant to achieving their personal and learning goals.

Students review how they developed their selected capability or capabilities, and how this helped to achieve their personal and learning goals.

Term 1

During term 1, students:

  • work on completing activities and tasks which assist in their understanding of each of the seven capabilities.
  • students also learn how to create cover letters and resumes, sit for mock-interviews and then reflect on this process

Term 2

During term 2, students:

  • identify personal and learning goals
  • create strategies to assist in achieving these goals
  • develop their selected capability(s) relevant to achieving their goals

Term 3

During term 3, students:

  • review their personal and learning goals and reflect on the effectiveness of the strategies they developed to achieve their goals.
  • review how they developed their selected capability(s)
  • how the development of their selected capability(s) helps to achieve their goals

Term 4

N/A

Assessment Methods

The following assessment types enable students to demonstrate their learning in the Stage 1 Personal Learning Plan:

  • Assessment Type 1: Folio
  • Assessment Type 2: Review.

Students produce three pieces of evidence for assessment of the folio. This evidence may take a variety of forms, such as:

  • a plan
  • a flowchart
  • a resumé
  • a diary
  • an electronic portfolio
  • interview or discussion notes or records.

Students produce at least one piece of evidence for assessment of the review. This evidence may take a variety of forms, such as:

  • a revised statement of personal and learning goals, and commentary on the proposed strategies to achieve them
  • an oral presentation
  • a multimedia presentation
  • a round-table discussion
  • a notebook
  • a feedback form
  • a personal web page

Students provide four pieces of evidence of their learning for assessment.

SACE Stage 1

Aims & Objectives for 2018

The study of psychology enables students to understand their own behaviours and the behaviours of others. Psychological knowledge can be applied to improve outcomes and the quality of experience in various areas of life, such as education, employment and leisure.

Psychology builds on the scientific method by involving students in the collection and analysis of qualitative and quantitative data.

By emphasising evidence-based procedures (i.e. observation, experimentation and experience), the subject allows students to develop useful skills in analytical and critical thinking, and in making inferences by employing evidence-based procedures.

Term 1

In term 1, students learn about the following topics:

1. Introduction to psychology – Key Ideas:

  • Psychology is distinct from other fields that study human behaviour.
  • Empirical investigations in psychology may be experimental, quantitative observational, or qualitative.
  • All investigation designs and methods for assessing psychological responses have advantages and disadvantages.
  • All research involving humans has ethical dimensions.

2. Emotion – Key Ideas:

  • In particular social contexts, people engage in behaviour in which they would otherwise not participate (e.g. compliance or aggression).
  • In particular social contexts, people do not engage in behaviour in which they would otherwise participate (e.g. helping or aggression).

Term 2

In term 2, students learn about the following topic:

3. Social behaviour – Key Ideas

  • In particular social contexts, people engage in behaviour in which they would otherwise not participate (e.g. compliance or aggression).
  • In particular social contexts, people do not engage in behaviour in which they would otherwise participate (e.g. helping or aggression).

In term 2, students also complete a group investigation which comprises of three stages:

  • proposal development
  • data analysis
  • report writing

Term 3

N/A

Term 4

N/A

Assessment Methods

The following assessment types enable students to demonstrate their learning in
Stage 1 Psychology:

  • Assessment Type 1: Investigations Folio
  • Assessment Type 2: Skills and Applications Tasks.

Students undertake one group investigation and one issues investigation to include in the folio.

Students undertake two skills and applications tasks. One skills and applications task is completed under the direct supervision of the teacher (i.e. test).

SACE Stage 2

Aims & Objectives for 2018

In the Research Project, students have the opportunity to study an area of interest in depth.

It will require students to use their creativity and initiative, while developing the research and presentation skills they will need in further study or work.

Term 1

In term 1, students:

  • students begin writing their proposal (evidence of planning) where they consider and define a research question, and outline their initial ideas for the research. During this proposal process, students consider and select research processes that are likely to be appropriate to their research question (i.e. valid, ethical, and manageable research processes)
  • research development phase (Folio), where students: develop the research, including knowledge and skills specific to the research question / organise and analyse information gathered / explore ideas / understand and develop one or more capability(s)

Term 2

In term 2, students:

  • continue working on / complete Folio
  • Students Produce and Substantiate their Research Outcome – Students synthesise their key findings (knowledge, skills, and ideas) to produce a Research Outcome.

Term 3

In term 3, students:

  • complete their Research Outcome
  • Review their Research – review the knowledge and skills developed in response to the research question / review decisions made in response to challenges and/or opportunities / reflect on the quality of the Research Outcome

Term 4

In term 4, students:

  • complete their Review of their Research

Assessment Methods

The following assessment types enable students to demonstrate their learning in Stage 2 Research Project:

  • Assessment Type 1: Folio (30%)
  • Assessment Type 2: Research Outcome (40%)
  • Assessment Type 3: Review (30%).
English

Year 8

Aims & Objectives for 2018

The English curriculum is built around the three interrelated strands of language, literature and literacy. Together, the strands focus on developing students’ knowledge, understanding and skills in listening, reading, viewing, speaking, writing and creating. Learning in English builds on concepts, skills and processes developed in earlier years, and teachers will revisit and strengthen these as needed.

Receptive modes (listening, reading and viewing)
By the end of Year 8, students understand how the selection of text structures is influenced by the selection of language mode and how this varies for different purposes and audiences. Students explain how language features, images and vocabulary are used to represent different ideas and issues in texts.
Students interpret texts, questioning the reliability of sources of ideas and information. They select evidence from the text to show how events, situations and people can be represented from different viewpoints. They listen for and identify different emphases in texts, using that understanding to elaborate on discussions.

Productive modes (speaking, writing and creating)
Students understand how the selection of language features can be used for particular purposes and effects. They explain the effectiveness of language choices they make to influence the audience. Through combining ideas, images and language features from other texts, students show how ideas can be expressed in new ways.
Students create texts for different purposes, selecting language to influence audience response. They make presentations and contribute actively to class and group discussions, using language patterns for effect. When creating and editing texts to create specific effects, they take into account intended purposes and the needs and interests of audiences. They demonstrate understanding of grammar, select vocabulary for effect and use accurate spelling and punctuation.

Term 1

Term 1 main topic: Report Writing

  • students are going to be investigating a made-up murder case, taking on the role, initially, of the police constable. For this topic, students will complete various reports i.e. a criminal record, a police report, etc.

In term 1, students also:

  • complete Every-Day Edits to work on their editing skills
  • read a class novel and complete journal entries on what they have read
  • complete weekly spelling contracts
  • complete weekly spelling tests

Term 2

Term 2 main topic: Holiday Camp creation project

  • students create a fictional Holiday Camp for their school – they are to envision all of the elements of the Holiday Camp and present them persuasively.

In term 2, students also:

  • complete Every-Day Edits to work on their editing skills
  • read a novel of their choice individually and complete a short Q&A presentation
  • complete weekly spelling contracts
  • complete weekly spelling tests

Term 3

Term 3 main topic: Novel Study
In term 3, students also:

  • complete Every-Day Edits to work on their editing skills
  • read a novel of their choice individually and complete a short Q&A presentation
  • complete weekly spelling contracts
  • complete weekly spelling tests

Term 4

Term 4 main topic: Poetry
In term 4, students also:

  • complete Every-Day Edits to work on their editing skills
  • read a novel of their choice individually and complete a short Q&A presentation
  • complete weekly spelling contracts
  • complete weekly spelling tests

Assessment Methods

Formative Assessment:
Feedback:

  • Verbal
  • Written
  • Peer

Self-assessment:

  • Teacher sets clear expectations for student performance and coaches students on assessment criteria
  • students self-edit own work
  • students peer-edit

Summative Assessment:

  • Spelling tests
  • Spelling contracts
  • Verbal presentations
  • Summative assignments i.e. written reports, essays

Year 9

Aims & Objectives for 2018

The English curriculum is built around the three interrelated strands of language, literature and literacy. Together, the strands focus on developing students’ knowledge, understanding and skills in listening, reading, viewing, speaking, writing and creating. Learning in English builds on concepts, skills and processes developed in earlier years, and teachers will revisit and strengthen these as needed.

Receptive modes (listening, reading and viewing)
By the end of Year 9, students analyse the ways that text structures can be manipulated for effect. They analyse and explain how images, vocabulary choices and language features distinguish the work of individual authors.
They evaluate and integrate ideas and information from texts to form their own interpretations. They select evidence from texts to analyse and explain how language choices and conventions are used to influence an audience. They listen for ways texts position an audience.

Productive modes (speaking, writing and creating)
Students understand how to use a variety of language features to create different levels of meaning. They understand how interpretations can vary by comparing their responses to texts to the responses of others. In creating texts, students demonstrate how manipulating language features and images can create innovative texts.
Students create texts that respond to issues, interpreting and integrating ideas from other texts. They make presentations and contribute actively to class and group discussions, comparing and evaluating responses to ideas and issues. They edit for effect, selecting vocabulary and grammar that contribute to the precision and persuasiveness of texts and using accurate spelling and punctuation.

Term 1

Term 1 main topic: persuasive writing – print advertisements

  • students will be analysing a range of print advertisements and creating their own – looking specifically at target audience, visual techniques and other aspects of print advertisements.

In term 1, students also:

  • complete Every-Day Edits to work on their editing skills
  • read a class novel and complete journal entries on what they have read
  • complete weekly spelling contracts
  • complete weekly spelling tests
  • NAPLAN preparation

Term 2

Term 2 main topic: “The Blind Side” film study

  • students will consider and analyse themes such as family and racism.

In term 2, students also:

  • complete Every-Day Edits to work on their editing skills
  • read a novel of their choice individually and complete a short Q&A presentation
  • complete weekly spelling contracts
  • complete weekly spelling tests
  • NAPLAN preparation

Term 3

Term 3 main topic: Horror Story
In term 3, students also:

  • complete Every-Day Edits to work on their editing skills
  • read a novel of their choice individually and complete a short Q&A presentation
  • complete weekly spelling contracts
  • complete weekly spelling tests

Term 4

Term 4 main topic: Poetry / Novel Study
In term 4, students also:

  • complete Every-Day Edits to work on their editing skills
  • read a novel of their choice individually and complete a short Q&A presentation
  • complete weekly spelling contracts
  • complete weekly spelling tests

Assessment Methods

Formative Assessment:
Feedback:

  • Verbal
  • Written
  • Peer

Self-assessment:

  • Teacher sets clear expectations for student performance and coaches students on assessment criteria
  • students self-edit own work
  • students peer-edit

Summative Assessment:

  • Spelling tests
  • Spelling contracts
  • Verbal presentations
  • Summative assignments i.e. written reports, essays

Year 10

Aims & Objectives for 2018

The English curriculum is built around the three interrelated strands of language, literature and literacy. Teaching and learning programs should balance and integrate all three strands. Together, the strands focus on developing students’ knowledge, understanding and skills in listening, reading, viewing, speaking, writing and creating. Learning in English builds on concepts, skills and processes developed in earlier years, and teachers will revisit and strengthen these as needed.

In Years 9 and 10, students interact with peers, teachers, individuals, groups and community members in a range of face-to-face and online/virtual environments. They experience learning in familiar and unfamiliar contexts, including local community, vocational and global contexts.

Students engage with a variety of texts for enjoyment. They interpret, create, evaluate, discuss and perform a wide range of literary texts in which the primary purpose is aesthetic, as well as texts designed to inform and persuade. These include various types of media texts, including newspapers, film and digital texts, fiction, non-fiction, poetry, dramatic performances and multimodal texts, with themes and issues involving levels of abstraction, higher order reasoning and intertextual references. Students develop critical understanding of the contemporary media and the differences between media texts.

The range of literary texts for Foundation to Year 10 comprises Australian literature, including the oral narrative traditions of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples, as well as the contemporary literature of these two cultural groups, and classic and contemporary world literature, including texts from and about Asia.

Literary texts that support and extend students in Years 9 and 10 as independent readers are drawn from a range of genres and involve complex, challenging and unpredictable plot sequences and hybrid structures that may serve multiple purposes. These texts explore themes of human experience and cultural significance, interpersonal relationships, and ethical and global dilemmas within real-world and fictional settings and represent a variety of perspectives. Informative texts represent a synthesis of technical and abstract information (from credible/verifiable sources) about a wide range of specialised topics. Text structures are more complex and include chapters, headings and subheadings, tables of contents, indexes and glossaries. Language features include successive complex sentences with embedded clauses, a high proportion of unfamiliar and technical vocabulary, figurative and rhetorical language, and dense information supported by various types of graphics and images.

Students create a range of imaginative, informative and persuasive types of texts including narratives, procedures, performances, reports, discussions, literary analyses, transformations of texts and reviews.

Term 1

  • To Kill a Mocking Bird
  • Literacy
  • Reading

Term 2

  • Grammar
  • Literacy
  • Spelling
  • Short Stories
  • Poetry

Term 3

  • Grammar
  • Literacy
  • Spelling
  • Crime Unit

Term 4

  • Grammar
  • Literacy
  • Spelling
  • Mythology Unit

Assessment Methods

  • Weekly Classwork
  • Essays
  • Narratives
  • Critical Analysis
  • Creative Writing
  • Tests

Stage One

Aims & Objectives for 2018

Essential English is a 10-credit subject or a 20-credit subject at Stage 1, and a 20-credit subject at Stage 2.
In this subject students respond to and create texts in and for a range of personal, social, cultural, community, and/or workplace contexts.
Students understand and interpret information, ideas, and perspectives in texts and consider ways in which language choices are used to create meaning.

Performance Standards for 2018

The performance standards covered across the year are:

Communication

The specific features are as follows:
C1 Clarity and coherence of written and spoken expression, using appropriate vocabulary.
C2 Demonstration of grammatical control.

Comprehension

The specific features are as follows:
Cp1 Comprehension of information, ideas, and perspectives in texts.
Cp2 Understanding of the purpose, structure, and language features in texts.

Analysis

The specific features are as follows:
An1 Analysis of ways in which creators of texts convey information, ideas, and perspectives.
An2 Identification and analysis of ways in which language features are used to create meaning in texts.

Application

The specific feature is as follows:
Ap1 Creation of texts for different purposes, using appropriate textual conventions, in real or imagined contexts.

Assessment Methods

Assessment Type 1: Responding to Texts

Students produce written, oral, and/or multimodal responses to a text or texts.
For a 10-credit subject, students complete at least one response to text. For a 20-credit subject, students complete at least two responses to texts.
They may respond to texts in a variety of forms, including a series of short answers and/or extended responses. The length of responses to texts can vary. Some responses may be short, others may be longer; however, no response should be more than 800 words or 5 minutes, or the equivalent in multimodal form.
Responses to texts could include, for example:

  • a commentary on a workplace text
  • an oral presentation with visual images
  • an email in response to a text
  • a series of brief responses to a film text
  • a discussion of a film, television program, or game
  • a review or comment on a set of instructions (e.g. a manual)
  • a blog in response to a news item or sports report
  • a set of annotations on a community information text
  • a director’s commentary on a section of a visual or dramatic text
  • exploration of the use of language in a campaign (e.g. advertising, political, advocacy).

For this assessment type, students provide evidence of their learning primarily in relation to the following assessment design criteria:

  • communication
  • comprehension
  • analysis.

Assessment Type 2: Creating Texts

Students create written, oral, and/or multimodal texts.
For a 10-credit subject, students create at least one text. For a 20-credit subject, students create at least two texts.
The texts may be functional, informational, analytical, imaginative, interpretive, and/or persuasive in purpose.
Students may create texts in a variety of forms. The length of the texts can vary. Some texts may be short, others may be longer; however, no text should be more than 800 words or 5 minutes, or the equivalent in multimodal form.
The texts created could include, but are not limited to:

  • a role play in a community or workplace context
  • instructions describing a process in either a written, oral, or multimodal form
  • a workplace report (e.g. on an accident or recommendation to change a process)
  • a series of social media entries advocating for an issue
  • an email or vodcast complaining about a product or problem
  • a ‘how to’ guide explaining how to use sporting equipment
  • a thank-you (e.g. birthday, wedding, or awards night speech)
  • a section of a graphic novel
  • an advocacy website
  • an article on a topic or theme of interest
  • an interactive story
  • a multimodal presentation creatively presenting a topic, issue, or theme
  • a short film trailer
  • a creative written narrative
  • transformation of a traditional children’s story into a modern setting
  • a report incorporating visual elements on a topic of interest
  • a multimedia display to inform a target group about a community issue.

For this assessment type, students provide evidence of their learning primarily in relation to the following assessment design criteria:

  • communication
  • application.
Mathematics

Year 7

Aims & Objectives for 2018

By the end of Year 7, students solve problems involving the comparison, addition and subtraction of integers. They make the connections between whole numbers and index notation and the relationship between perfect squares and square roots. They solve problems involving percentages and all four operations with fractions and decimals. They compare the cost of items to make financial decisions. Students represent numbers using variables. They connect the laws and properties for numbers to algebra. They interpret simple linear representations and model authentic information. Students describe different views of three-dimensional objects. They represent transformations in the Cartesian plane. They solve simple numerical problems involving angles formed by a transversal crossing two lines. Students identify issues involving the collection of continuous data. They describe the relationship between the median and mean in data displays.

Students use fractions, decimals and percentages, and their equivalences. They express one quantity as a fraction or percentage of another. Students solve simple linear equations and evaluate algebraic expressions after numerical substitution. They assign ordered pairs to given points on the Cartesian plane. Students use formulas for the area and perimeter of rectangles and calculate volumes of rectangular prisms. Students classify triangles and quadrilaterals. They name the types of angles formed by a transversal crossing parallel line. Students determine the sample space for simple experiments with equally likely outcomes and assign probabilities to those outcomes. They calculate mean, mode, median and range for data sets. They construct stem-and-leaf plots and dot-plots.

Term 1

  • Whole numbers
  • Properties of numbers
  • Positive & negative numbers
  • Fractions
  • Decimal numbers
  • Percentage

Term 2

  • Algebra: expressions & formulae
  • Equations
  • Coordinates
  • Line graphs
  • Ratio & rates

Term 3

  • Angles, lines & parallelism
  • Polygons
  • Measurement
  • Transformations

Term 4

  • Solids
  • Probability
  • Statistics

Assessment Methods

Each term students will engage in the following assessments:

  • 2 Topic Quizzes
  • 1 Test (a combination of topics)
  • 1 Project

Year 8

Aims & Objectives for 2018

To enable students to:

  • Solve every day problems involving rates, ratios, profit and loss, volume of prisms and convert between units of measurement for Area, Volume and perimeter of different shapes.
  • Identify conditions of congruence, solve linear equations and graph linear relationships on the Cartesian plane.
  • Explain issues related to the collection of data and the effect of outliers on means and medians in that data.

Term 1

Number and Algebra

Natural numbers, Integers, index notation, order of operations, Primes and composites, square numbers and square roots.
Sets, component of a set, intersection and union, Venn diagrams and problem solving with Venn diagrams.
Fractions, operation with fractions, Decimal numbers, rational numbers and irrational numbers.

Term 2

Number and Algebra

Algebraic notations, collecting like terms, product and quotient simplifications, generalising arithmetic, Algebraic substitutions, linear equations, and solving equations.
Expressing quantity as a percentage of another, finding a percentage of a quantity, percentage increase or decrease, finding a percentage change and business applications of percentages.

Index laws, simplifying and factorisation of algebraic expressions, brackets with negative coefficients.

Term 3

Measurement and Geometry

Measuring the length, perimeter, circumference, and area of different shapes, volume.
Understanding the relationship between units. Converting units of measurement of capacity and Time.

Term 4

Statistics and Probability

Dealing with the chances or likelihood of an event taking place using sample space, theoretical and experimental probabilities from tabled data or Venn diagram.
Categorical / numerical data.

Assessment Methods

  • Chapter quizzes
  • End of Term Exams
  • Ongoing class work / homework assessment

Year 9

Aims & Objectives for 2018

To enable students to:

  • Solve problems involving simple interest, interpret ratio and scale, factors, explain similarity of triangles and recognise the connections between similarity and the trigonometric ratios.
  • Able to compare techniques for collecting data from primary and secondary sources, make sense of the position of the mean and median in skewed, symmetric and bi-modal displays to describe and interpret data.
  • Be able to apply the index laws to numbers and express numbers in scientific notation, expand binomial expressions, find the distance between two points on the Cartesian plane and the gradient and midpoint of a line segment. They sketch linear and non-linear relations.
  • Be able to use Pythagoras’ Theorem and trigonometry to find unknown sides of right-angled triangles.
  • Calculate relative frequencies to estimate probabilities, list outcomes for two-step experiments and assign probabilities for those outcomes. They construct histograms and back-to-back stem-and-leaf plots.

Term 1

Number and Algebra

Extend and apply the index laws to variables, the distributive law to the expansion of algebraic expressions, including binomials, and collect like terms where appropriate and index laws to numerical expressions with integer indices.

Term 2

Number and Algebra
  • Express numbers in scientific notation, and solve problems involving simple interest
  • Factorise algebraic expressions by taking out a common algebraic factor and simplify algebraic products and quotients using index laws
  • Apply the four operations to simple algebraic fractions with numerical denominators, and expand binomial products and factorise monic quadratic expressions using a variety of strategies
  • Substitute values into formulas to determine an unknown

Term 3

Measurement and Geometry

Measuring the length, perimeter, area formulae and area of composite figuress.
Measuring and calculating surface area of solids, volume capacity and time.
Coordinate geometry.

Term 4

Statistics and Probability

Types of data, discrete and numerical data, measuring the centre and spread of the data set and data collection. Experimental probability from tabled data, life tables, sample space, theoretical probability, using two dimensional grids

Assessment Methods

  • Chapter quizzes
  • End of Term Exams
  • Ongoing class work / homework assessment

Year 10

Aims & Objectives for 2018

The proficiency strands understanding, fluency, problem-solving and reasoning are an integral part of mathematics content across the three content strands: number and algebra, measurement and geometry, and statistics and probability. The proficiencies reinforce the significance of working mathematically within the content and describe how the content is explored or developed. They provide the language to build in the developmental aspects of the learning of mathematics. The achievement standards reflect the content and encompass the proficiencies.
At this year level:
understanding includes applying the four operations to algebraic fractions, finding unknowns in formulas after substitution, making the connection between equations of relations and their graphs, comparing simple and compound interest in financial contexts and determining probabilities of two- and three-step experiments fluency includes factorising and expanding algebraic expressions, using a range of strategies to solve equations and using calculations to investigate the shape of data sets problem-solving includes calculating the surface area and volume of a diverse range of prisms to solve practical problems, finding unknown lengths and angles using applications of trigonometry, using algebraic and graphical techniques to find solutions to simultaneous equations and inequalities and investigating independence of events reasoning includes formulating geometric proofs involving congruence and similarity, interpreting and evaluating media statements and interpreting and comparing data sets.

Term 1

Factorise algebraic expressions by taking out a common algebraic factor (ACMNA230)
Simplify algebraic products and quotients using index laws (ACMNA231)
Apply the four operations to simple algebraic fractions with numerical denominators (ACMNA232)
Expand binomial products and factorise monic quadratic expressions using a variety of strategies (ACMNA233)
Substitute values into formulas to determine an unknown (ACMNA234)
Connect the compound interest formula to repeated applications of simple interest using appropriate digital technologies (ACMNA229)

Term 2

Substitute values into formulas to determine an unknown (ACMNA234)
Solve problems involving linear equations, including those derived from formulas (ACMNA235)
Solve linear inequalities and graph their solutions on a number line (ACMNA236)
Solve right-angled triangle problems including those involving direction and angles of elevation and depression (ACMMG245)

Term 3

Solve problems involving surface area and volume for a range of prisms, cylinders and composite solids (ACMMG242)
Formulate proofs involving congruent triangles and angle properties (ACMMG243)
Apply logical reasoning, including the use of congruence and similarity, to proofs and numerical exercises involving plane shapes (ACMMG244)
Solve simple quadratic equations using a range of strategies (ACMNA241)

Term 4

Describe the results of two- and three-step chance experiments, both with and without replacements, assign probabilities to outcomes and determine probabilities of events. Investigate the concept of independence (ACMSP246)
Use the language of ‘if ….then, ‘given’, ‘of’, ‘knowing that’ to investigate conditional statements and identify common mistakes in interpreting such language (ACMSP247)
Determine quartiles and interquartile range (ACMSP248)
Construct and interpret box plots and use them to compare data sets (ACMSP249)
Compare shapes of box plots to corresponding histograms and dot plots (ACMSP250)
Use scatter plots to investigate and comment on relationships between two numerical variables (ACMSP251)
Investigate and describe bivariate numerical data where the independent variable is time (ACMSP252)
Evaluate statistical reports in the media and other places by linking claims to displays, statistics and representative data (ACMSP253)

Assessment Methods

  • Class Tests
  • Class Exercises
  • Homework

Year 11

Aims & Objectives for 2018

Mathematics at Stage 1 builds on the mathematical knowledge, understanding, and skills that students have developed in Number and Algebra, Measurement and Geometry, and Statistics and Probability during Year 10. Stage 1 Mathematics is organised into topics that broaden students’ mathematical experience, and provide a variety of contexts for incorporating mathematical arguments and problem-solving. The topics provide a blending of algebraic and geometric thinking. In this subject there is a progression of content, applications, and level of sophistication and abstraction.

Term 1

Investing and Borrowing

Students discuss reasons for investing money and investigate using financial institutions and the share market as vehicles for investment of a sum of money. They calculate their expected returns from simple and compound interest investments using electronic technology (such as spreadsheets and financial packages in graphic calculators) and examine the effects of changing interest rates, terms, and investment balances. Students make comparisons between various scenarios and considerations of the limitations on the reliability of predictions made using simple and compound interest models.
Share market calculations include the costs of buying and returns from selling shares, break-even prices, and returns from dividends. Students make comparisons between the returns possible from share investments and those made in financial institutions. The effects of taxation and inflation on the return from a lump sum investment are investigated to determine whether real growth has occurred. Students consider the costs of borrowing money using credit or a personal loan, by accessing calculation tools on the internet.

Measurement

Students apply measurement techniques such as estimation, units of measurement, scientific notation, and measuring devices, and consider their accuracy. They extend their understanding of Pythagoras’ theorem and use formulae to calculate the perimeter, area, and volume of standard plane and solid shapes, including triangles, quadrilaterals, circles, ellipses, prisms, pyramids, cylinders, cones, and spheres. This study is extended to compounds of these shapes. The estimation of irregular areas and volumes is considered by approximation using simple regular shapes or by applying Simpson’s rule.

Term 2

Measurement (continued)

Students examine scales as they apply in practical contexts such as reading and making maps, plans, or models. Problems set in familiar contexts are used to develop students’ understanding of the concept of rates as changes in related measurements, for example flow rates, density, or unit pricing.

Statistical investigation

This topic begins with consideration of the structure of the process of statistical investigation from the collection of data using various methods of sampling. It proceeds to analysis using measures of central location and spread, to the formation of conjectures and the drawing of conclusions based on that analysis.
In sampling, there is emphasis on the importance of eliminating bias as well as ensuring the validity and reliability of results. Analysis of data incorporates its representation in tabular and graphical form (stem-and-leaf plots, box-and-whisker diagrams, and histograms) and the calculation of summary statistics from the sample.
Students learn to form conjectures that are supported or refuted by a logical argument, using justification from the results of their analysis. The suitability of the statistical tools and measures used in the solution of the problems is emphasised throughout this topic. Electronic technology is used to aid in the statistical investigation process

Term 3

To be advised

Term 4

To be advised

Assessment Methods

  • Skills and Applications Task
  • Mathematical Investigation
Physics

Year 11

Aims & Objectives for 2018

In this subject, students are expected to:

  1. Apply science inquiry skills to design and conduct physics investigations, using appropriate procedures and safe, ethical working practices
  2. Obtain, record, represent, analyse, and interpret the results of physics investigations
  3. Evaluate procedures and results, and analyse evidence to formulate and justify conclusions
  4. Develop and apply knowledge and understanding of physics concepts in new and familiar contexts
  5. Explore and understand science as a human endeavour
  6. Communicate knowledge and understanding of physics concepts, using appropriate terms, conventions, and representations.

Term 1

Linear Motion and Forces

In this topic, students acquire the skills and understanding to describe and explain motion in a variety of formats, including algebraic and graphical representations. They use the equations of motion and various graphical methods to elicit quantitative and qualitative information about moving objects that undergo constant acceleration and hence further build their literacy and numeracy skills.
Following the study of motion under constant acceleration, students consolidate their understanding of forces and the effect that forces have on the motion of objects, using Newton’s Laws of Motion.
Throughout this topic, the importance of the concepts and laws in explaining physical phenomena is emphasised and their role in providing a foundation for contemporary applications is also highlighted. Students explore the limitations of the models and ways in which concepts can inform and explain existing, developing, and emerging technologies.
Critical thinking and an understanding of linear motion and forces enable students to devise solutions and make reasonable predictions.

Term 2

Electric circuits

This topic extends students’ knowledge and understanding of the concepts of circuit electricity. It explores the concept of electric charge and the requirements for electric current and introduces the concepts of potential difference, current, resistance, electric power, and efficiency. These concepts are applied to direct current (DC) electric circuits and form the essential understanding for Stage 2, Topic 2: Electricity and magnetism when discussing the production of magnetic fields and the generation and transmission of electricity.
Students extend their numeracy skills when problem solving in this topic, and their personal and social capability is fostered by considering electrical safety devices and the impact of electrical energy use on the local and global environment.

Term 3

To be advised

Term 4

To be advised

Assessment Methods

  • Skills and Applications Task
  • Practical Investigation
  • Science as Human Endeavour Task
Science

Year 7

Aims & Objectives for 2018

In Year 7, students explore the diversity of life on Earth and continue to develop their understanding of the role of classification in ordering and organising information. They use and develop models such as food chains, food webs and the water cycle to represent and analyse the flow of energy and matter through ecosystems and explore the impact of changing components within these systems. They consider the interaction between multiple forces when explaining changes in an object’s motion. They explore the notion of renewable and non-renewable resources and consider how this classification depends on the timescale considered. They investigate relationships in the Earth-sun-moon system and use models to predict and explain events. Students make accurate measurements and control variables to analyse relationships between system components. They explore and explain these relationships through appropriate representations and consider the role of science in decision making processes.

Term 1

Strand: General
Topic: Scientific Data and Safety
Content Descriptors:
Reflect on scientific investigations including evaluating the quality of the data collected, and identifying improvements (ACSIS131)
Use scientific knowledge and findings from investigations to evaluate claims based on evidence (ACSIS132)
Measure and control variables, select equipment appropriate to the task and collect data with accuracy (ACSIS126)

Strand: chemistry
Topic: Separating Mixtures
Content Descriptors:
Mixtures, including solutions, contain a combination of pure substances that can be separated using a range of techniques (ACSSU113)

Term 2

Strand: Physics
Topic: Forces and Machines
Content Descriptors:
Change to an object’s motion is caused by unbalanced forces, including Earth’s gravitational attraction, acting on the object (ACSSU117)

Term 3

Strand: Biology

Topic: Classification
Content Descriptors:
Classification helps organise the diverse group of organisms (ACSSU111)

Topic: Ecosystems
Content Descriptors:
Interactions between organisms, including the effects of human activities can be represented by food chains and food webs (ACSSU112)

Term 4

Strand: Earth & Space Science

Topic: Solar system
Content Descriptors:
Predictable phenomena on Earth, including seasons and eclipses, are caused by the relative positions of the sun, Earth and the moon (ACSSU115)

Strand: Earth Science
Topic: renewable resources
Content Descriptors:
Some of Earth’s resources are renewable, including water that cycles through the environment, but others are non-renewable (ACSSU116)

Assessment Methods

  • Tests
  • Peer Presentations
  • Online interactive simulations
  • Practical Laboratory Work
  • Written Tasks
  • Practical Reports
  • 3D Models
  • Inquiry Tasks

Year 8

Aims & Objectives for 2018

In Year 8, students are introduced to cells as microscopic structures that explain macroscopic properties of living systems. They link form and function at a cellular level and explore the organisation of body systems in terms of flows of matter between interdependent organs. Similarly, they explore changes in matter at a particle level, and distinguish between chemical and physical change. They begin to classify different forms of energy, and describe the role of energy in causing change in systems, including the role of heat and kinetic energy in the rock cycle. Students use experimentation to isolate relationships between components in systems and explain these relationships through increasingly complex representations. They make predictions and propose explanations, drawing on evidence to support their views while considering other points of view.

Term 1

Strand: General
Topic: Scientific Data and Safety
Content Descriptors:
Scientific knowledge has changed peoples’ understanding of the world and is refined as new evidence becomes available (ACSHE134)

Strand: Chemistry
Topic: Chemical science
Content Descriptors:
Properties of the different states of matter can be explained in terms of the motion and arrangement of particles (ACSSU151)
Differences between elements, compounds and mixtures can be described at a particle level (ACSSU152)
Chemical change involves substances reacting to form new substances (ACSSU225)

Term 2

Strand: Biology
Topic: function and structure of Animal and Plant Cells. Body systems.
Content Descriptors:
Cells are the basic units of living things; they have specialised structures and functions (ACSSU149)
Multi-cellular organisms contain systems of organs carrying out specialised functions that enable them to survive and reproduce (ACSSU150)
Multi-cellular organisms rely on coordinated and interdependent internal systems to respond to changes to their environment (ACSSU175)

Term 3

Strand: Physics
Topic: Energy
Content Descriptors:
Energy appears in different forms, including movement (kinetic energy), heat and potential energy, and energy transformations and transfers cause change within systems (ACSSU155)

Term 4

Strand: Earth Science
Topic: Rocks and mining (indigenous heritage). Layers of the Earth
Content Descriptors:
Sedimentary, igneous and metamorphic rocks contain minerals and are formed by processes that occur within Earth over a variety of timescales(ACSSU153)

Assessment Methods

  • Tests
  • Peer Presentations
  • Online interactive simulations
  • Practical Laboratory Work
  • Written Tasks
  • Practical Reports
  • 3D Models
  • Inquiry Tasks

Year 9

Aims & Objectives for 2018

In Year 9, students consider the operation of systems at a range of scales. They explore ways in which the human body as a system responds to its external environment and the interdependencies between biotic and abiotic components of ecosystems. They are introduced to the notion of the atom as a system of protons, electrons and neutrons, and how this system can change through nuclear decay. They learn that matter can be rearranged through chemical change and that these changes play an important role in many systems. They are introduced to the concept of the conservation of matter and begin to develop a more sophisticated view of energy transfer. They begin to apply their understanding of energy and forces to global systems such as continental movement.

Term 1

Strand: General
Topic: Nature and development of science
Content Descriptors:

Scientific understanding, including models and theories, is contestable and is refined over time through a process of review by the scientific community(ACSHE157)
Advances in scientific understanding often rely on developments in technology and technological advances are often linked to scientific discoveries(ACSHE158)

Strand: Chemistry
Topic: Chemical science introduction, theories, atoms and chemical reactions
Content Descriptors:

All matter is made of atoms that are composed of protons, neutrons and electrons; natural radioactivity arises from the decay of nuclei in atoms(ACSSU177)
Chemical reactions involve rearranging atoms to form new substances; during a chemical reaction mass is not created or destroyed (ACSSU178)
Chemical reactions, including combustion and the reactions of acids, are important in both non-living and living systems and involve energy transfer(ACSSU179)

Term 2

Strand: Biology

Topic: Ecosystems

Content Descriptors:
Ecosystems consist of communities of interdependent organisms and abiotic components of the environment; matter and energy flow through these systems (ACSSU176)

Strand: Biology

Topic: Systems working together (animals and plants)

Content Descriptors:
Multi-cellular organisms rely on coordinated and interdependent internal systems to respond to changes to their environment (ACSSU175)

Term 3

Strand: Earth Science

Topic: Earth, seafloor spreading, volcanic and earthquake phenomenon
Content Descriptors:
The theory of plate tectonics explains global patterns of geological activity and continental movement (ACSSU180)

Term 4

Strand: Physics
Topic: Energy around us
Content Descriptors:
Energy transfer through different mediums can be explained using wave and particle models (ACSSU182)

Assessment Methods

  • Tests
  • Peer Presentations
  • Online interactive simulations
  • Practical Laboratory Work
  • Written Tasks
  • Practical Reports
  • 3D Models
  • Inquiry Tasks

Year 10

Aims & Objectives for 2018

To enable students to explore the biological, chemical, geological and physical evidence for different theories, such as the theories of natural selection and the Big Bang. To develop their understanding of atomic theory to understand relationships within the periodic table, understand that motion and forces are related by applying physical laws. To learn about the relationships between aspects of the living, physical and chemical world that are applied to systems on a local and global scale and this enables them to predict how changes will affect equilibrium within these systems. Formulate questions or hypotheses that can be investigated scientifically plan, select and use appropriate investigation types, including field work and laboratory experimentation, to collect reliable data; assess risk and address ethical issues associated with these methods.

Term 1

Biological Science

Topic: Building Blocks of life – DNA and Genetics
Content Descriptors:
Transmission of heritable characteristics from one generation to the next involves DNA and genes
The theory of evolution by natural selection explains the diversity of living things and is supported by a range of scientific evidence

Term 2

Physical Sciences

Topic: Motion and Energy
Content Descriptors:
Energy conservation in a system can be explained by describing energy transfers and transformations (ACSSU190)
The motion of objects can be described and predicted using the laws of physics (ACSSU229)

Term 3

Chemical Sciences

Topic: Elements & Chemical reactions
Content Descriptors:
The atomic structure and properties of elements are used to organise them in the Periodic Table
Different types of chemical reactions are used to produce a range of products and can occur at different rates.

Term 4

Earth and Spaces Sciences

Topic: The Earth we live in
Content Descriptors:
The universe contains features including galaxies, stars and solar systems, and the Big Bang theory can be used to explain the origin of the universe
Global systems, including the carbon cycle, rely on interactions involving the biosphere, lithosphere, hydrosphere and atmosphere.

Assessment Methods

  • Practical Reports
  • Research assignments
  • Tests
  • Exams and ongoing class work/ home work assessments
Visual Art

Year 7 & 8

Aims & Objectives for 2018

By the end of Year 8, students identify and analyse how other artists use visual conventions and viewpoints to communicate ideas and apply this knowledge in their art making. They explain how an artwork is displayed to enhance its meaning. They evaluate how they and others are influenced by artworks from different cultures, times and places.

Students plan their art making in response to exploration of techniques and processes used in their own and others’ artworks. They demonstrate use of visual conventions, techniques and processes to communicate meaning in their artworks.

Term 1

Introduction to ‘ISLAMIC ART’. Students will learn how much of Islamic Art is derived from geometric shapes. They will observe examples and reflect on their understanding.

Introduction to ‘scaling’. Students will learn the concept of scaling and how to apply it to reproducing artworks accurately.

Introduction to ‘Perspective’. Students will be introduced to single point and 2 point perspective.

Term 2

  • Introduction to Aboriginal Art.
  • Exploring Sculpture.
  • Introduction to ‘Impressionism’.

Term 3

Introduction to ‘engineering drawing’. Students will learn the concept of ‘engineering based’ graphical representation.
Students will learn the concept of ‘engineering based’ graphical representation. This will help to equip them with the knowledge that is complimentary to the project that they will be completing in Design and Technology. (To include Isometric and orthographic techniques).

Term 4

Introducing students to logos and their effect in business. Students begin the planning a personalized logo. They will begin to investigate and evaluate some inspirational graphical techniques.

Introduction to ‘digital art’. Students will use digital technology and software to investigate how the digital age has affected the production of artwork.

Assessment Methods

Evidence of Learning: (may include major formative learning tasks, rubrics, formal and informal feedback, student self-assessment, anecdotal notes, observations).

Students will keep an ‘Art Journal’ to reflect on their learning.

Feedback: (What sort of feedback will students receive?)
Ongoing constructive feedback and encouragement.

Self-assessment: (How will students reflect upon and self-assess their learning?)
Students will display work and self and peer critique.

Year 9 & 10

Aims & Objectives for 2018

By the end of Year 10, students evaluate how representations communicate artistic intentions in artworks they make and view. They evaluate artworks and displays from different cultures, times and places. They analyse connections between visual conventions, practices and viewpoints that represent their own and others’ ideas. They identify influences of other artists on their own artworks.
Students manipulate materials, techniques and processes to develop and refine techniques and processes to represent ideas and subject matter in their artworks.
Students plan their art making in response to exploration of techniques and processes used in their own and others’ artworks. They demonstrate use of visual conventions, techniques and processes to communicate meaning in their artworks .
They use historical and conceptual explanations to critically reflect on the contribution of visual arts practitioners as they make and respond to visual artworks.
Build on their experience from the previous band to develop their understanding of the roles of artists and audiences.

Term 1

Introduction to ‘ISLAMIC ART’. Students will learn how much of Islamic Art is derived from geometric shapes. They will observe examples and reflect on their understanding.

Introduction to ‘scaling’. Students will learn the concept of scaling and how to apply it to reproducing artworks accurately.

Introduction to ‘Perspective’. Students will be introduced to single point and 2 point perspective.

Term 2

  • Introduction to Aboriginal Art.
  • Exploring Sculpture.
  • Introduction to ‘Impressionism’.

Term 3

Introduction to ‘engineering drawing’. Students will learn the concept of ‘engineering based’ graphical representation.
Students will learn the concept of ‘engineering based’ graphical representation. This will help to equip them with the knowledge that is complimentary to the project that they will be completing in Design and Technology. (To include Isometric and orthographic techniques).

Term 4

Introducing students to logos and their effect in business. Students begin the planning a personalized logo. They will begin to investigate and evaluate some inspirational graphical techniques.

Introduction to ‘digital art’. Students will use digital technology and software to investigate how the digital age has affected the production of artwork.

Assessment Methods

Evidence of Learning: (may include major formative learning tasks, rubrics, formal and informal feedback, student self-assessment, anecdotal notes, observations).

Students will keep an ‘Art Journal’ to reflect on their learning.

Feedback: (What sort of feedback will students receive?)
Ongoing constructive feedback and encouragement.

Self-assessment: (How will students reflect upon and self-assess their learning?)
Students will display work and self and peer critique.

Humanities

Year 7

Aims & Objectives for 2018

Students explain the role of groups and the significance of particular individuals in past societies. They suggest reasons for continuity and change over time. They describe the effects of change on societies, individuals and groups and describe events and developments from the perspective of people who lived at the time. They identify past events and developments that have been interpreted in different ways. Students describe geographical processes that influence the characteristics of places. They explain interconnections between people and places and people and environments, describing how these interconnections change places and environments. Students identify the ideas, values and principles that underpin the institutions and processes in Australia’s political and legal systems. They explain the diverse nature of Australian society, and identify the importance of shared values in contemporary Australian society. Students describe the interdependence of consumers and producers in the market and identify factors and strategies that contribute to the financial success of businesses and individuals. They identify why individuals choose to work and the various sources of income that exist. Students recognise that people have different perceptions of places, events and issues and explain how this and other factors influence views on how to respond to an issue or challenge.

Term 1

  • What are resources, where do we find them and why are they important?
  • Renewable and non-renewable energies
  • Water in the world and in Australia
  • Hazards and disasters

Term 2

  • What is place?
  • Why do people live in certain places?
  • Push and pull factors
  • Living in urban, rural and remote areas
  • Cities of the world
  • Liveability and sustainability: Are they compatible?
  • Sustainable Development Goals

Term 3

  • Historians, archaeologists and the ancient past
  • Investigating an ancient mystery: the Olmec
  • The ancient past before farming
  • The ancient past since farming
  • Ancient Egypt

Term 4

  • Ancient Greece
  • Ancient Rome
  • Ancient China
  • Ancient India

Assessment Methods

Students will be assessed via:

  • Written Essays
  • Research tasks
  • Oral presentations
  • Summative and formative assessments
  • Collaborative tasks (group work etc.)
  • Student centred learning tasks

Year 8

Aims & Objectives for 2018

History

Students recognise and explain patterns of change and continuity over time. They explain the causes and effects of events and developments. They identify the motives and actions of people at the time. Students explain the significance of individuals and groups and how they were influenced by the beliefs and values of their society. They describe different interpretations of the past.
Students sequence events and developments within a chronological framework with reference to periods of time. When researching, students develop questions to frame a historical inquiry. They analyse, select and organise information from primary and secondary sources and use it as evidence to answer inquiry questions. Students identify and explain different points of view in sources. When interpreting sources, they identify their origin and purpose, and distinguish between fact and opinion. Students develop texts, particularly descriptions and explanations, incorporating analysis. In developing these texts, and organising and presenting their findings, they use historical terms and concepts, evidence identified in sources, and acknowledge their sources of information.

Geography

Students explain geographical processes that influence the characteristics of places and explain how places are perceived and valued differently. They explain interconnections within environments and between people and places and explain how they change places and environments. They compare alternative strategies to a geographical challenge, taking into account environmental, economic and social factors.
Students identify geographically significant questions from observations to frame an inquiry. They evaluate a range of primary and secondary sources to locate useful and reliable information and data. They select, record and represent data and the location and distribution of geographical phenomena in a range of appropriate digital and non-digital forms, including maps at different scales that conform to cartographic conventions. They analyse geographical maps, data and other information to propose explanations for spatial distributions, patterns, trends and relationships, and draw reasoned conclusions. Students present findings, arguments and ideas using relevant geographical terminology and digital technologies in a range of appropriate communication forms. They propose action in response to a geographical challenge, taking account of environmental, economic and social factors, and predict the outcomes of their proposal.

Term 1

  • Landforms and landscapes around the world and in Australia
  • Processes that shape our planet
  • The importance of landscapes to different cultures
  • How do we look after our planet?
  • Natural disasters now and in the future

Term 2

  • Where do most Australians live?
  • Where have Australians lived in the past?
  • Urbanisation
  • What is migration and why are people on the move?
  • Where are the worlds cities?
  • Megacities
  • How are cities designed to be sustainable?
  • Urbanisation impacts and problems
  • Slums
  • Australian cities compared to others around the world
  • Planning Australia’s urban future

Term 3

  • The world in change (650 – 1400)
  • A world of expanding contacts (1400 – 1750)
  • The Vikings (790 – 1066)
  • Medieval Europe (590 – 1500)
  • The Ottoman Empire (1299 – 1683)
  • Renaissance Italy (1400 – 1600)

Term 4

  • Angkor and the Khmer Empire (802 – 1431)
  • Japan under the shoguns (794 – 1867)
  • Polynesian expansions across the Pacific (700 – 1756)
  • Mongol expansion (1206 – 1368)
  • The Black Death – a 14th century plague
  • The Spanish conquest of the Americas (1492 – 1572)

Assessment Methods

Students will be assessed via:

  • Written Essays
  • Research tasks
  • Oral presentations
  • Summative and formative assessments
  • Collaborative tasks (group work etc.)
  • Student centred learning tasks

Year 9

Aims & Objectives for 2018

History

Students refer to key events and the actions of individuals and groups to explain patterns of change and continuity over time. They analyse the causes and effects of events and developments and make judgments about their importance. They explain the motives and actions of people at the time. Students explain the significance of these events and developments over the short and long term. They explain different interpretations of the past.
Students sequence events and developments within a chronological framework, with reference to periods of time and their duration. When researching, students develop different kinds of questions to frame a historical inquiry. They interpret, process, analyse and organise information from a range of primary and secondary sources and use it as evidence to answer inquiry questions. Students examine sources to compare different points of view. When evaluating these sources, they analyse origin and purpose, and draw conclusions about their usefulness. They develop their own interpretations about the past. Students develop texts, particularly explanations and discussions, incorporating historical interpretations. In developing these texts and organising and presenting their conclusions, they use historical terms and concepts, evidence identified in sources, and they reference these sources.

Geography

Students explain how geographical processes change the characteristics of places. They analyse interconnections between people, places and environments and explain how these interconnections influence people, and change places and environments. They predict changes in the characteristics of places over time and identify the possible implications of change for the future. Students analyse alternative strategies to a geographical challenge using environmental, social and economic criteria.
Students use initial research to identify geographically significant questions to frame an inquiry. They evaluate a range of primary and secondary sources to select and collect relevant and reliable geographical information and data. They record and represent multi-variable data in a range of appropriate digital and non-digital forms, including a range of maps that comply with cartographic conventions. They use a range of methods and digital technologies to interpret and analyse maps, data and other information to propose explanations for patterns, trends, relationships and anomalies across time and space, and to predict outcomes. Students synthesise data and information to draw reasoned conclusions. They present findings, arguments and explanations using relevant geographical terminology and digital representations in a range of appropriate communication forms. Students propose action in response to a geographical challenge, taking account of environmental, economic and social factors, and predict the outcomes and consequences of their proposal.

Term 1

  • What is a biome?
  • Different biomes around the world
  • Major biomes in Australia
  • The Great Barrier Reef
  • Different forms of agriculture
  • Do we have enough food for the future?
  • Impacts of agriculture on our biomes
  • Biodiversity
  • Irrigation: Positives and negatives

Term 2

  • How do people connect with places?
  • How do people see places?
  • Liveability and poverty
  • Tourism: What is it and why is it happening?
  • Impacts of tourism
  • Globalisation
  • Trade and foreign aid
  • Technology and communication

Term 3

  • The modern world and Australia (1750 – 1918)
  • The Industrial Revolution (1750 – 1914): Technology and progress
  • The Industrial Revolution (1750 – 1914): The impact on people
  • Movement of peoples (1750 – 1901)

Term 4

  • Making a nation – Australia (1750 – 1918): Colonisation and conflict
  • Making a nation – Australia (1750 – 1918): From colonies to nationhood
  • Asia and the world: China (1750 – 1918)
  • World War I (1914 – 1918)

Assessment Methods

Students will be assessed via:

  • Written Essays
  • Research tasks
  • Oral presentations
  • Summative and formative assessments
  • Collaborative tasks (group work etc.)
  • Student centred learning tasks

Year 10

Aims & Objectives for 2018

History

Students refer to key events, the actions of individuals and groups, and beliefs and values to explain patterns of change and continuity over time. They analyse the causes and effects of events and developments and explain their relative importance. They explain the context for people’s actions in the past. Students explain the significance of events and developments from a range of perspectives. They explain different interpretations of the past and recognise the evidence used to support these interpretations.
Students sequence events and developments within a chronological framework, and identify relationships between events across different places and periods of time. When researching, students develop, evaluate and modify questions to frame a historical inquiry. They process, analyse and synthesise information from a range of primary and secondary sources and use it as evidence to answer inquiry questions. Students analyse sources to identify motivations, values and attitudes. When evaluating these sources, they analyse and draw conclusions about their usefulness, taking into account their origin, purpose and context. They develop and justify their own interpretations about the past. Students develop texts, particularly explanations and discussions, incorporating historical argument. In developing these texts and organising and presenting their arguments, they use historical terms and concepts, evidence identified in sources, and they reference these sources.

Geography

Students explain how interactions between geographical processes at different scales change the characteristics of places. Students identify, analyse and explain significant interconnections between people, places and environments and explain changes that result from these interconnections and their consequences. They predict changes in the characteristics of places and environments over time, across space and at different scales and explain the predicted consequences of change. They evaluate alternative views on a geographical challenge and alternative strategies to address this challenge using environmental, economic, political and social criteria and draw a reasoned conclusion.
Students use initial research to develop and modify geographically significant questions to frame an inquiry. They critically evaluate a range of primary and secondary sources to select and collect relevant, reliable and unbiased geographical information and data. Students record and represent multi-variable data in of the most appropriate digital and non-digital forms, including a range of graphs and maps that use suitable scales and comply with cartographic conventions. They use a range of methods and digital technologies to interpret and analyse maps, data and other information to make generalisations and inferences, propose explanations for significant patterns, trends, relationships and anomalies across time and space and at different scales, and predict outcomes. They analyse and synthesise data and other information to draw reasoned conclusions, taking into account alternative perspectives. Students present findings, arguments and explanations using relevant geographical terminology and graphic representations and digital technologies in a range of selected and appropriate communication forms. They evaluate their findings and propose action in response to a contemporary geographical challenge, taking account of environmental, economic, political and social considerations. They explain the predicted outcomes and consequences of their proposal.

Civics and Citizenship

Students compare and evaluate the key features and values of systems of government, and analyse the Australian Government’s global roles and responsibilities. They analyse the role of the High Court and explain how Australia’s international legal obligations influence law and government policy. Students evaluate a range of factors that sustain democratic societies.
When researching, students evaluate a range of questions to investigate Australia’s political and legal systems and critically analyse information gathered from different sources for relevance, reliability and omission. They account for and evaluate different interpretations and points of view on civics and citizenship issues. When planning for action, students take account of multiple perspectives and ambiguities, use democratic processes, and negotiate solutions to an issue. Students develop and present evidenced-based arguments incorporating different points of view on civics and citizenship issues. They use appropriate texts, subject-specific language and concepts. They evaluate ways they can be active and informed citizens in different contexts.

Economics and business

Students explain why and how governments manage economic performance to improve living standards. They give explanations for variations in economic performance and standards of living within and between economies. They analyse factors that influence major consumer and financial decisions and explain the short- and long-term effects of these decisions. They explain how businesses respond to changing economic conditions and improve productivity. Students evaluate the effect of organisational and workforce management on business performance.
When researching, students develop questions and formulate hypotheses to frame an investigation of an economic or business issue or event. They gather and analyse reliable data and information from different sources to identify trends, explain relationships and make predictions. Students generate alternative responses to an issue, taking into account multiple perspectives. They use cost-benefit analysis and appropriate criteria to propose and justify a course of action. They apply economics and business knowledge, skills and concepts to familiar, unfamiliar and complex hypothetical problems. Students develop and present evidence-based conclusions and reasoned arguments incorporating different points of view. They use appropriate texts, subject-specific language, conventions and concepts. They analyse the intended and unintended effects of economic and business decisions and the potential consequences of alternative actions.

Term 1

  • Introduction to environmental change and management
  • What is a population?
  • People and the environment
  • Ecological footprint and biocapacity
  • World inequality
  • Climate change: What is it, what are the impacts and can we do anything about it?
  • Land degradation
  • Invasive species
  • Indigenous management of the land

Term 2

  • Revision of WWI
  • The years after WWI
  • WWII
  • The Cold War
  • Rights and freedoms: What are they and do we all have them?
  • Indigenous Australians and their rights and freedoms
  • Globalisation
  • The environmental movement
  • Australia and migration

Term 3

  • Government and democracy
  • Key values of Australia’s system of government
  • Australian government compared to the Asia region
  • Australia’s role and responsibilities at a global level
  • The United Nations
  • Law and Citizens
  • The role of the High Court

Term 4

  • Australia’s economy
  • Indicators of economic performance
  • Links between economic performance and living standards
  • Government management of economic performance
  • Financial decisions and their consequences
  • Responding to changing economic conditions

Assessment Methods

Students will be assessed via:

  • Written Essays
  • Research tasks
  • Oral presentations
  • Summative and formative assessments
  • Collaborative tasks (group work etc.)
  • Student centred learning tasks
LOTE Arabic

All Year Levels

Aims & Objectives for 2018

The Arabic language program at Garden College is based on the SACSA Framework (South Australian Standards & Accountability Framework) in the primary and middle schools and on SSABSA’s requirements (Senior Secondary Assessment Board of South Australia) in the senior school. It is designed to teach students from diverse linguistic and cultural backgrounds to communicate effectively in Arabic and to better understand the Arabic language and its culture. The program contributes significantly to the objectives of Garden College, which aim to facilitate and enhance students’ appreciation of the teachings of the Holy Quran. A student – centred approach is used in the Arabic classroom. We facilitate students’ interaction with each other and exposes them to spoken and written texts at varying levels of complexity. We help students to develop a level of language proficiency that will allow them to express themselves in Arabic, both through speaking and writing. Thus, a high level of linguistic sophistication gives students the confidence not only to communicate in Arabic, but also to explore and appreciate its culture.

Term 1

  1. Brainstorming of key ideas/vocab
  2. Reading and analysing text
  3. Reading aloud for fluency
  4. Answering questions on text

Term 2

  1. Spelling/dictation
  2. Imitating sentences/structure from model text
  3. Answering questions on text
  4. Reading and analysing text

Term 3

  1. Rearranging the word to form sentences
  2. Reading and analysing text
  3. Listening for information

Term 4

  1. Reconstructing text
  2. Rearranging the word to form sentences
  3. Reading and analysing text
  4. Listening for information

Assessment Methods

Interaction

Most students show an appropriate command of oral language at this level. An interaction assessment task has to give students an opportunity to interact with others to exchange information, ideas, opinions, or experiences

Text Analysis

Tasks included a variety of reading and responding tasks and listening and responding tasks. Most students show an appropriate command of language at this level in both domains, and the ability to extract information and interpret intention of a range of texts.

Oral Examination

Practice is essential in the preparation for an oral examination and students are encouraged to participate in as many opportunities using oral language as possible.

Written Examination

Assessment information for the written examination.

Biology

Stage One

Aims & Objectives for 2018

Biology is a 10-credit subject or a 20-credit subject at Stage 1 and a 20-credit subject at Stage 2.
The study of Biology is constructed around inquiry into and application of understanding the diversity of life as it has evolved, the structure and function of living things, and how they interact with their own and other species and their environments.
Students investigate biological systems and their interactions, from the perspectives of energy, control, structure and function, change, and exchange in microscopic cellular structures and processes, through to macroscopic ecosystem dynamics. These investigations allow students to extend the skills, knowledge, and understanding that enable them to explore and explain everyday observations, find solutions to biological issues and problems, and understand how biological science impacts on their lives, society, and the environment. They apply their understanding of the interconnectedness of biological systems to evaluate the impact of human activity on the natural world.
In their study of Biology, students inquire into and explain biological phenomena and draw evidence-based conclusions from their investigations into biology-related issues, developments, and innovations.

Topics for Stage 1 Biology

Semester 1:
Topic 1: Cells and microorganisms
Topic 4: Biodiversity and ecosystem dynamics

Semester 2:
Topic 2: Infectious disease
Topic 3: Multicellular organisms

Performance Standards for 2018

Investigation, Analysis, and Evaluation
The specific features are as follows:
IAE1 Design of a biological investigation.
IAE2 Obtaining, recording, and representation of data, using appropriate conventions and formats.
IAE3 Analysis and interpretation of data and other evidence to formulate and justify conclusions.
IAE4 Evaluation of procedures and their effect on data.

Knowledge and Application
The specific features are as follows:
KA1 Demonstration of knowledge and understanding of biological concepts.
KA2 Development and application of biological concepts in new and familiar contexts.
KA3 Exploration and understanding of the interaction between science and society.
KA4 Communication of knowledge and understanding of biological concepts and information, using appropriate terms, conventions, and representations.

Assessment Methods

Assessment Type 1: Investigations Folio

For a 10-credit subject, students undertake at least one practical investigation and one investigation with a focus on science as a human endeavour. Students may undertake more than one practical investigation within the maximum number of assessments allowed.
For a 20-credit subject, students undertake at least two practical investigations and two investigations with a focus on science as a human endeavour. Students may undertake more than two practical investigations within the maximum number of assessments allowed.
Students inquire into aspects of biology through practical discovery and data analysis, and/or by selecting, analysing, and interpreting information.

Practical Investigations

As students design and safely carry out investigations, they demonstrate their science inquiry skills by:

  • deconstructing a problem to determine the most appropriate method for investigation
  • formulating investigable questions and hypotheses
  • selecting and using appropriate equipment, apparatus, and techniques
  • identifying variables
  • collecting, representing, analysing, and interpreting data
  • evaluating procedures and considering their impact on results
  • drawing conclusions
  • communicating knowledge and understanding of concepts.

Practical investigations can be conducted individually or collaboratively. For each investigation, students present an individual report.
One practical investigation should enable students to deconstruct a problem to investigate a question or hypothesis for which the outcome is uncertain.
One practical investigation should enable students to design their own procedure and provide evidence of how the procedure has been developed. In order to manage the process efficiently, students could individually design investigations and then conduct one of these as a group, or design hypothetical investigations at the end of a practical activity.
A practical report should include:

  • introduction with relevant biological concepts and either a hypothesis and variables or an investigable question
  • materials/apparatus*
  • method/procedure that outlines the steps to be taken*
  • identification and management of safety and/or ethical risks*
  • results*
  • analysis of results, identifying trends, and linking results to concepts
  • evaluation of procedures and data, and identifying sources of uncertainty
  • conclusion, with justification.

The report should be a maximum of 1000 words if written, or a maximum of 6 minutes for an oral presentation, or the equivalent in multimodal form.
A summary sheet outlining the deconstruction process (where applicable) should be attached to the report*. Suggested formats for the summary sheet include flow charts, concept maps, tables, or notes.
*The five asterisked sections of materials/apparatus, method/procedures, risks, results, and deconstruction are excluded from the word count.
Suggested formats for presentation of a practical investigation report include:

  • a written report
  • an oral presentation
  • a multimodal product.
Science as a Human Endeavour Investigation

Students investigate a contemporary example of how science interacts with society. This may focus on one or more of the key concepts of science as a human endeavour described on pages 11 and 12 and may draw on a context suggested in the topics or relate to a new context.
Students could consider, for example, how:

  • humans seek to improve their understanding and explanation of the natural world
  • working scientifically is a way of obtaining knowledge that allows for testing scientific claims
  • scientific theory can change in the light of new evidence
  • technological advances change ways of working scientifically
  • links between advances in science impact and influence society
  • society influences scientific research
  • emerging biology-related careers and pathways involve science.

Students access information from different sources, select relevant information, analyse their findings, explain the connection to science as a human endeavour, and develop and explain their own conclusions from the investigation.
Possible starting points for the investigation could include, for example:

  • the announcement of a discovery in the field of biological science
  • an expert’s point of view on a controversial innovation
  • a TED talk based on a biological development
  • an article from a scientific publication (e.g. Cosmos)
  • public concern about an issue that has environmental, social, economic, or political implications.

The science as a human endeavour investigation should be a maximum of 1000 words if written, or a maximum of 6 minutes for an oral presentation, or the equivalent in multimodal form.
For this assessment type, students provide evidence of their learning in relation to the following assessment design criteria:

  • investigation, analysis, and evaluation
  • knowledge and application.

Assessment Type 2: Skills and Applications Tasks

For a 10-credit subject, students undertake at least one skills and applications task. Students may undertake more than one skills and applications task within the maximum number of assessments allowed, but at least one should be under the direct supervision of the teacher. The supervised setting (e.g. classroom, laboratory, or field) should be appropriate to the task.
For a 20-credit subject, students undertake at least two skills and applications tasks. Students may undertake more than two skills and applications tasks within the maximum number of assessments allowed, but at least two should be under the direct supervision of the teacher. The supervised setting (e.g. classroom, laboratory, or field) should be appropriate to the task.
Skills and applications tasks allow students to provide evidence of their learning in tasks that may:

  • be applied, analytical, and/or interpretative
  • pose problems in new and familiar contexts
  • involve individual or collaborative assessments, depending on task design.

A skills and applications task may involve, for example:

  • solving problems
  • designing an investigation to test a hypothesis or investigable question
  • considering different scenarios in which to apply knowledge and understanding
  • graphing, tabulating, and/or analysing data
  • evaluating procedures and identifying their limitations
  • formulating and justifying conclusions
  • representing information diagrammatically or graphically
  • using biological terms, conventions, and notations.

As a set, skills and applications tasks should be designed to enable students to apply their science inquiry skills, demonstrate knowledge and understanding of key biological concepts and learning, and explain connections with science as a human endeavour. Problems and scenarios should be set in a relevant context, which may be practical, social, or environmental.
Skills and applications tasks may include, for example:

  • modelling or representing concepts
  • developing simulations
  • practical and/or graphical skills
  • a multimodal product
  • an oral presentation
  • participation in a debate
  • an extended response
  • responses to short-answer questions
  • a structured interview
  • an excursion report
  • a response to science in the media.

For this assessment type, students provide evidence of their learning in relation to the following assessment design criteria:

  • investigation, analysis, and evaluation
  • knowledge and application.
Chemistry

Stage One

Aims & Objectives for 2018

Chemistry is a 10-credit subject or a 20-credit subject at Stage 1 and a 20-credit subject at Stage 2.
In their study of Chemistry, students develop and extend their understanding of how the physical world is chemically constructed, the interaction between human activities and the environment, and the use that human beings make of the planet’s resources. They explore examples of how scientific understanding is dynamic and develops with new evidence, which may involve the application of new technologies.
Students consider examples of benefits and risks of chemical knowledge to the wider community, along with the capacity of chemical knowledge to inform public debate on social and environmental issues. The study of Chemistry helps students to make informed decisions about interacting with and modifying nature, and explore options such as green or sustainable chemistry, which seeks to reduce the environmental impact of chemical products and processes.
Through the study of Chemistry, students develop the skills that enable them to be questioning, reflective, and critical thinkers; investigate and explain phenomena around them; and explore strategies and possible solutions to address major challenges now and in the future (for example, in energy use, global food supply, and sustainable food production).
Students integrate and apply a range of understanding, inquiry, and scientific thinking skills that encourage and inspire them to contribute their own solutions to current and future problems and challenges, and pursue future pathways, including in medical or pharmaceutical research, pharmacy, chemical engineering, and innovative product design.

Performance Standards for 2018

The performance standards describe five levels of achievement, A to E.
Each level of achievement describes the knowledge, skills and understanding that teachers refer to in deciding how well students have demonstrated their learning on the basis of the evidence provided.

Investigation, Analysis and Evaluation

A.
Designs a logical, coherent, and detailed chemistry investigation.
Obtains, records, and represents data, using appropriate conventions and formats accurately and highly effectively.
Systematically analyses and interprets data and evidence to formulate logical conclusions with detailed justification.
Critically and logically evaluates procedures and discusses their effect on data.

B.
Designs a well-considered and clear chemistry investigation.
Obtains, records, and represents data, using appropriate conventions and formats mostly accurately and effectively.
Logically analyses and interprets data and evidence to formulate suitable conclusions with reasonable justification.
Logically evaluates procedures and their effect on data.

C.
Designs a considered and generally clear chemistry investigation.
Obtains, records, and represents data, using generally appropriate conventions and formats with some errors but generally accurately and effectively.
Undertakes some analysis and interpretation of data and evidence to formulate generally appropriate conclusions with some justification.
Evaluates procedures and some of their effect on data.

D.
Prepares the outline of a chemistry investigation.
Obtains, records, and represents data, using conventions and formats inconsistently, with occasional accuracy and effectiveness.
Describes data and undertakes some basic interpretation to formulate a basic conclusion.
Attempts to evaluate procedures or suggest an effect on data.

E.
Identifies a simple procedure for a chemistry investigation.
Attempts to record and represent some data, with limited accuracy or effectiveness.
Attempts to describe results and/or interpret data to formulate a basic conclusion.
Acknowledges that procedures affect data.

Knowledge and Application

A.
Demonstrates deep and broad knowledge and understanding of a range of chemical concepts.
Develops and applies chemical concepts highly effectively in new and familiar contexts.
Critically explores and understands in depth the interaction between science and society.
Communicates knowledge and understanding of chemistry coherently, with highly effective use of
appropriate terms, conventions, and representations.

B.
Demonstrates some depth and breadth of knowledge and understanding of a range of chemical concepts.
Develops and applies chemical concepts mostly effectively in new and familiar contexts.
Logically explores and understands in some depth the interaction between science and society.
Communicates knowledge and understanding of chemistry mostly coherently, with effective use of
appropriate terms, conventions, and representations.

C.
Demonstrates knowledge and understanding of a general range of chemical concepts.
Develops and applies chemical concepts generally effectively in new or familiar contexts.
Explores and understands aspects of the interaction between science and society.
Communicates knowledge and understanding of chemistry generally effectively, using some
appropriate terms, conventions, and representations.

D.
Demonstrates some basic knowledge and partial understanding of chemical concepts.
Develops and applies some chemical concepts in familiar contexts.
Partially explores and recognises aspects of the interaction between science and society.
Communicates basic chemical information, using some appropriate terms, conventions, and/or
representations.

E.
Demonstrates limited recognition and awareness of chemical concepts.
Attempts to develop and apply chemical concepts in familiar contexts.
Attempts to explore and identify an aspect of the interaction between science and society.
Attempts to communicate information about chemistry.

Assessment Methods

Assessment Type 1: Folio

For the folio, students undertake at least one Chemistry exploration assessment in which they work either individually or in a group to explore, research, and reflect on an idea, question, or issue arising from the study of a topic.
The assessment can take a number of forms, for example:

  • an essay
  • a group presentation
  • a multimedia presentation
  • an oral presentation
  • a report.

Students also undertake a solo practical investigation, during which they must individually design an experimental procedure to investigate the effects of dependent and independent variables. Students must:

  • deconstruct the problem
  • pose a hypothesis
  • identify dependent and independent variables
  • consider factors that should be held constant and explain why and how they will attempt to control these factors
  • identify factors that may not be able to be controlled
  • list materials required
  • devise a procedure to be followed
  • consider how they will display and analyse data
  • identify safety considerations.
  • carry out the procedure and record their results.

Students will write a report that includes:

  • an introduction with relevant chemistry concepts, an hypothesis and variables, or investigable question
  • materials/apparatus, method/procedure outlining and trials and steps to be taken
  • identification and management of safety and/or ethical risks
  • results
  • analysis of results, identifying trends, and linking results to concepts
  • evaluation of procedures and data, identifying sources of uncertainty

Assessment Type 2: Skills and applications task

SAT1.

In this task students:

  • use resources to find information about six substances of a range of structure types
  • explain the information obtained in terms of the structures of the substances
  • design an investigation to determine properties related to the structure and bonding of two unknown white powders
  • use the evidence from their investigation to determine the identity of the two white powders
  • connect the data to concepts and hence formulate a conclusion about the identity of the two white powders
  • answer questions relating structure to uses of substances.

SAT2.
This SAT consists of short-answer questions. will require students to:

  • demonstrate their knowledge and application of the principles of atomic structure, the periodic table, bonding between atoms, the relationship between structure type and the properties and uses of substances, shapes of molecules, secondary interactions, the mole concept and organic compounds.
  • attempt problems of a range of difficulty and complexity
  • attempt problems posed in both familiar and new social contexts
  • demonstrate understanding of the impact of chemistry on society
  • attempt relevant calculations.
Media Studies

Stage One

Aims & Objectives for 2018

Media Studies is a 10-credit subject or a 20-credit subject at Stage 1. It involves reading, viewing, writing, listening, discussing, debating, and interacting. Stage 1 Media Studies also involves creating media products and analysing media. Students create and examine a range of media texts, thus developing their skills and knowledge, and their understanding of media as symbolic systems.
When studying the suggested topics, students should be given opportunities to undertake research, debate issues, produce a range of texts, and present their views in a variety of ways. Students should reflect on their own experiences of media when studying their chosen topics.

Performance Standards for 2018

Knowledge and Understanding

The specific features are as follows:
KU1 Knowledge and understanding of media concepts, issues, and interactions.
KU2 Knowledge and understanding of how audiences influence, and are influenced by, forms and content of media texts.

Research and Analysis

The specific features are as follows:
RA1 Analysis and recognition of different points of view, bias, values, or intent across a range of media texts.
RA2 Research into and analysis of the ways in which groups and individuals are represented in media.
RA3 Analysis of interactions with media.

Producing

The specific features are as follows:
P1 Design and planning of media texts.
P2 Use of appropriate production techniques and technologies.

Communication

The specific features are as follows:
C1 Reproduction of the forms and features of media texts, to convey meaning.
C2 Fluency of expression and use of appropriate media terminology.

Assessment Methods

Assessment Type 1: Folio

For the folio, students undertake at least one media exploration assessment in which they work either individually or in a group to explore, research, and reflect on an idea, question, or issue arising from the study of a topic.
The assessment can take a number of forms, for example:

  • a debate
  • a discussion
  • an essay
  • a group presentation
  • a multimedia presentation
  • an oral presentation
  • a report.

Whether undertaking a media exploration assessment individually or in a group, each student presents an individual response, which should be a maximum of 800 words if written or a maximum of 5 minutes if oral, or the equivalent in multimodal form.
For this assessment type, students provide evidence of their learning primarily in relation to the following assessment design criteria:

  • knowledge and understanding
  • research and analysis
  • communication.

 Assessment Type 2: Interaction Study

Students undertake at least one interaction study on a topic of their choice. Either individually or in a group, students interact with media and analyse their interactions. The topic that students choose should be based on their current or past media experience and their access to a variety of media resources.
For the interaction study, students could, for example, analyse their use and experience of:

  • various interactive games
  • media as they research career options within the media
  • converging media such as mobile phones and the Internet
  • new technologies and ways of adapting and adopting them for work, leisure, and/or educational purposes
  • media in a global context.

Students identify and outline the topic they want to study and then choose the form in which they present their findings. The length and form of the response will vary, depending on the topic and approach chosen.
Whether undertaking an interaction study individually or in a group, each student presents an individual response, which should be a maximum of 800 words if written or a maximum of 5 minutes if oral, or the equivalent in multimodal form.
For this assessment type, students provide evidence of their learning primarily in relation to the following assessment design criteria:

  • knowledge and understanding
  • research and analysis
  • communication.

Assessment Type 3: Product

Students undertake at least one media production task in which they work either individually or in a group to:

  • develop a plan for a production task
  • identify relevant techniques to be used
  • complete a final media product
  • evaluate the final media product.

The final media product represents students’ accumulated understanding of concepts, conventions, and style, as well as the skills they have acquired in using available equipment to create a media product.
Where students decide to complete a media product as a small group, protocols need to be clearly documented and agreed at the beginning of the task. For example, students negotiate with their teacher to have their contribution to the group product assessed individually, or agree that all students in the group will obtain the same assessment.
Video productions should run for a maximum of 5 minutes (except for television advertisements or community service announcements that run for 30, 45, or 60 seconds), and should include appropriate post-production work such as audio, titling, and credits.
Animated video products should run for a maximum of 2 minutes and should contain appropriate post-production work such as audio, titling, and credits.
Radio productions that include music, sound effects, and spoken dialogue should be a maximum of 20 minutes. Radio productions that exclude music should be a maximum of 5 minutes.
A multimedia task is one that involves the use of appropriate hardware devices and the manipulation of relevant software programs with multimedia functions, including static and moving images of digital video, animation, text, interactivity, and sound. Multimedia productions should contain a maximum of ten linked pages or layers. Digital video and animations that are part of a multimedia product should run for approximately 20 seconds.
Up to 30% of each finished product of any format may consist of pre-recorded content from other sources, unless the production is specifically addressing the techniques and styles of emerging genres such as Mashup or Anime Music Videos (AMV). All content from other sources must be acknowledged.
For this assessment type, students provide evidence of their learning primarily in relation to the following assessment design criteria:

  • producing
  • communication
Society and Culture

Stage One

Aims & Objectives for 2018

Society and Culture is a 10-credit subject or a 20-credit subject at Stage 1, and a 10-credit subject or a 20-credit subject at Stage 2.
In Society and Culture, students explore and analyse the interactions of people, societies, cultures, and environments. Using an interdisciplinary approach, they analyse the structures and systems of contemporary societies and cultures.
Students learn about the ways in which societies constantly change and are affected by social, political, historical, environmental, economic, and cultural factors. They investigate the ways in which people function in groups and communicate within and across cultural groups. They develop the skills and experience to understand how individual and group involvement can influence change, and to consider the consequences of a range of possible social actions. Through their study of Society and Culture, students develop the ability to influence their own future by acquiring skills, values, and understanding that enable them to participate effectively in contemporary society.
Society and Culture gives students critical insight into the significance of factors such as gender, ethnicity, racism, class, and power structures that affect the lives and identities of individuals and groups. They develop the skills to critically analyse a range of viewpoints about peoples, societies, and issues; understand diversity within and across societies; and extend their awareness of the connections between, and the interdependence of, societies and cultures.
Students use inquiry processes to explore concepts of society and culture in Australian (local and national) and global contexts. They choose and explore a range of primary and secondary sources and evaluate different viewpoints and perspectives. They learn to challenge their own thinking and develop skills in presenting opinions supported by evidence.
Students develop their skills in collaborative and independent thinking and inquiry by investigating the causes and consequences of a broad range of social issues and actions. They communicate informed opinions in a range of ways.
Students have the opportunity to build intercultural understanding by exploring the history, knowledge, and contemporary cultures of different peoples.

Performance Standards for 2018

Knowledge and Understanding

The specific features are as follows:
KU1 Knowledge and understanding of contemporary social and/or cultural issues in Australian and global contexts.
KU2 Understanding of connections between societies and cultures.

Investigation and Analysis

The specific features are as follows:
IA1 Analysis of and reflection on contemporary social or cultural issues.
IA2 Analysis of how and why social change occurs.
IA3 Investigation and analysis of a range of sources and perspectives.

Collaboration

The specific features are as follows:
Cl1 Collaborative investigation of a range of perspectives on a contemporary social or cultural issue.
Cl2 Reflection on learning and sharing of learning with others.

Communication

The specific features are as follows:
Cm1 Communication of informed ideas about social and/or cultural issues and societies.
Cm2 Communication of opinions supported by evidence, with appropriate acknowledgment of sources.

Assessment Methods

Assessment Type 1: Sources Analysis

Students undertake at least one sources analysis assessment for a 10-credit subject, and two to four sources analysis assessments for a 20-credit subject. They identify, investigate, and analyse different sources to gain insight into social or cultural issues or aspects of societies.
Students gather information from primary and/or secondary sources. Primary sources may include observations and recordings from field trips to cultural or social events or centres, a study of cultural artefacts, or interaction with guest speakers and other people in the school or the local community, including other students. Students may undertake activities as individuals, in groups, or as members of a whole class. They record qualitative or quantitative data, using surveys, journals, photographs, or spreadsheets, or other means.
Students investigate and analyse relevant information from the different sources.
Students negotiate with the teacher the form — written, oral, or multimodal — in which to communicate their learning about the social or cultural issue or aspect of society. For example, they could use a classroom discussion, an argument, a forum, a dramatic presentation, a mock parliamentary debate, a symbolic representation, mime and drama, movement and dance, music and song, debates, reports, or interviews to communicate their learning.
A sources analysis assessment should be a maximum of 800 words if written or a maximum of 5 minutes for an oral presentation, or the equivalent in multimodal form.
When students are involved in group activities they need to identify, record, and present evidence of learning individually.
For this assessment type, students provide evidence of their learning primarily in relation to the following assessment design criteria:

  • investigation and analysis
  • communication

Assessment Type 2: Group Activity

Students undertake at least one group activity for a 10-credit subject, and two group activities for a 20-credit subject. They:

  • work collaboratively in a group to define and investigate different perspectives on a contemporary social or cultural issue that is relevant to one or more of the topics studied.
  • reflect on and share their learning with others.

The group could be a pair, or a larger group, of students from the class or a local or virtual community. Students need to have evidence (e.g. notes) of their contribution to the collaboration.
Students reflect on and share their learning with others in a round-table discussion or other method of communication that enables each member of the group to demonstrate his or her contribution.
Each student’s contribution to a group activity should be a maximum of 750 words if written or a maximum of 5 minutes for an oral presentation, or the equivalent in multimodal form.
For this assessment type, students provide evidence of their learning primarily in relation to the following assessment design criteria:

  • knowledge and understanding
  • investigation and analysis
  • collaboration

Assessment Type 3: Investigation

Students undertake at least one investigation for a 10-credit subject, and two investigations for a 20-credit subject. They choose a contemporary social or cultural issue to investigate. They identify and refine guiding questions and investigate, analyse, and use relevant information from different sources, which may include primary sources. Students support their conclusions with evidence from their investigations.
Students may take into account the context of the issue — historical, economic, environmental, or other — or consider how and why social change has affected, or may affect, the issue.
Students negotiate the form of presentation — written, oral, or multimodal — with the teacher. Guiding questions are suggested in the ‘Key Skills of Social Inquiry’ section in Learning Scope and Requirements.
A presentation should be a maximum of 1000 words if written or a maximum of 6 minutes for an oral presentation, or the equivalent in multimodal form.
For this assessment type, students provide evidence of their learning primarily in relation to the following assessment design criteria:

  • knowledge and understanding
  • investigation and analysis
  • communication
Personal Learning Plan

SACE Stage 1

Aims & Objectives for 2018

The Personal Learning Plan (PLP) is a compulsory subject at Stage 1, undertaken at Year 10. The PLP helps students to plan for their future and assists them in choosing the subjects they will study in Years 11 and 12.

Students develop their knowledge and understanding of seven capabilities through their learning in the Personal Learning Plan. The seven capabilities are:

  • literacy
  • numeracy
  • information and communication technology capability
  • critical and creative thinking
  • personal and social capability
  • ethical understanding
  • intercultural understanding

Students select and develop one or more capabilities relevant to achieving their personal and learning goals.

Students review how they developed their selected capability or capabilities, and how this helped to achieve their personal and learning goals.

Term 1

During term 1, students:

  • work on completing activities and tasks which assist in their understanding of each of the seven capabilities.
  • students also learn how to create cover letters and resumes, sit for mock-interviews and then reflect on this process

Term 2

During term 2, students:

  • identify personal and learning goals
  • create strategies to assist in achieving these goals
  • develop their selected capability(s) relevant to achieving their goals

Term 3

During term 3, students:

  • review their personal and learning goals and reflect on the effectiveness of the strategies they developed to achieve their goals.
  • review how they developed their selected capability(s)
  • how the development of their selected capability(s) helps to achieve their goals

Term 4

N/A

Assessment Methods

The following assessment types enable students to demonstrate their learning in the Stage 1 Personal Learning Plan:

  • Assessment Type 1: Folio
  • Assessment Type 2: Review.

Students produce three pieces of evidence for assessment of the folio. This evidence may take a variety of forms, such as:

  • a plan
  • a flowchart
  • a resumé
  • a diary
  • an electronic portfolio
  • interview or discussion notes or records.

Students produce at least one piece of evidence for assessment of the review. This evidence may take a variety of forms, such as:

  • a revised statement of personal and learning goals, and commentary on the proposed strategies to achieve them
  • an oral presentation
  • a multimedia presentation
  • a round-table discussion
  • a notebook
  • a feedback form
  • a personal web page

Students provide four pieces of evidence of their learning for assessment.

Psychology

SACE Stage 1

Aims & Objectives for 2018

The study of psychology enables students to understand their own behaviours and the behaviours of others. Psychological knowledge can be applied to improve outcomes and the quality of experience in various areas of life, such as education, employment and leisure.

Psychology builds on the scientific method by involving students in the collection and analysis of qualitative and quantitative data.

By emphasising evidence-based procedures (i.e. observation, experimentation and experience), the subject allows students to develop useful skills in analytical and critical thinking, and in making inferences by employing evidence-based procedures.

Term 1

In term 1, students learn about the following topics:

1. Introduction to psychology – Key Ideas:

  • Psychology is distinct from other fields that study human behaviour.
  • Empirical investigations in psychology may be experimental, quantitative observational, or qualitative.
  • All investigation designs and methods for assessing psychological responses have advantages and disadvantages.
  • All research involving humans has ethical dimensions.

2. Emotion – Key Ideas:

  • In particular social contexts, people engage in behaviour in which they would otherwise not participate (e.g. compliance or aggression).
  • In particular social contexts, people do not engage in behaviour in which they would otherwise participate (e.g. helping or aggression).

Term 2

In term 2, students learn about the following topic:

3. Social behaviour – Key Ideas

  • In particular social contexts, people engage in behaviour in which they would otherwise not participate (e.g. compliance or aggression).
  • In particular social contexts, people do not engage in behaviour in which they would otherwise participate (e.g. helping or aggression).

In term 2, students also complete a group investigation which comprises of three stages:

  • proposal development
  • data analysis
  • report writing

Term 3

N/A

Term 4

N/A

Assessment Methods

The following assessment types enable students to demonstrate their learning in
Stage 1 Psychology:

  • Assessment Type 1: Investigations Folio
  • Assessment Type 2: Skills and Applications Tasks.

Students undertake one group investigation and one issues investigation to include in the folio.

Students undertake two skills and applications tasks. One skills and applications task is completed under the direct supervision of the teacher (i.e. test).

Research Project

SACE Stage 2

Aims & Objectives for 2018

In the Research Project, students have the opportunity to study an area of interest in depth.

It will require students to use their creativity and initiative, while developing the research and presentation skills they will need in further study or work.

Term 1

In term 1, students:

  • students begin writing their proposal (evidence of planning) where they consider and define a research question, and outline their initial ideas for the research. During this proposal process, students consider and select research processes that are likely to be appropriate to their research question (i.e. valid, ethical, and manageable research processes)
  • research development phase (Folio), where students: develop the research, including knowledge and skills specific to the research question / organise and analyse information gathered / explore ideas / understand and develop one or more capability(s)

Term 2

In term 2, students:

  • continue working on / complete Folio
  • Students Produce and Substantiate their Research Outcome – Students synthesise their key findings (knowledge, skills, and ideas) to produce a Research Outcome.

Term 3

In term 3, students:

  • complete their Research Outcome
  • Review their Research – review the knowledge and skills developed in response to the research question / review decisions made in response to challenges and/or opportunities / reflect on the quality of the Research Outcome

Term 4

In term 4, students:

  • complete their Review of their Research

Assessment Methods

The following assessment types enable students to demonstrate their learning in Stage 2 Research Project:

  • Assessment Type 1: Folio (30%)
  • Assessment Type 2: Research Outcome (40%)
  • Assessment Type 3: Review (30%).