Curriculum: Primary

YEAR-RECEPTION (FOUNDATION)

Lesson Structure

Reading and Viewing – Receptions begin the year with letter recognition work and daily exposure to various literatures. They begin reading high frequency words and basic books. Once capable, Receptions begin guided reading lessons four times a week. During these lessons students are grouped according to their reading levels. In small groups with their teacher, they are guided through a higher comprehension of the text.

Writing – Receptions are encouraged to write in some form every day. At the start of the year this will begin with the drawing of a message, scribing, tracing and progress towards writing a few sentences by the end of the year. Receptions are encouraged to spell accurately. They are given weekly spelling words and are exposed to various spelling patterns.

Speaking and Listening – Receptions develop their listening and speaking skills daily with their peers and teachers. They present at weekly show and tell sessions and provide various oral presentations. Receptions develop effective speaking skills such as using correct eye contact and appropriate gestures.

Benchmarks and Recommendations

Reading and viewing – It is recommended that Reception students practice reading their ‘THRASS hot words – level 1’ (which are high frequency words) every night. When the student is confident with reading all of the words in the set inform the teacher so that the student may be tested. Students will be allocated a reading level based on a Running Record assessment taken by the teacher. Students should read their Reader to a proficient reader every night. It is recommended that the student is asked questions about the book to help them understand what they have read. Students are tested once a term on their reading levels and given reading books accordingly, however if the reader is too difficult or too easy, the parent should inform the class teacher.

Writing – It is recommended that Receptions have regular handwriting and writing practice. Students should practice correct letter formation and size, and writing on the lines every night. It is important that students practice their spelling words and practice placing them into sentences.

Speaking and listening – It is beneficial for students to practice their oral presentations before they present them at school. Students should practice using a clear legible voice and speak coherently.

Foundation/Reception Year Achievement Standard

Receptive modes (listening, reading and viewing)

By the end of the Foundation year, students use predicting and questioning strategies to make meaning from texts. They recall one or two events from texts with familiar topics. They understand that there are different types of texts and that these can have similar characteristics. They identify connections between texts and their personal experience.

They read short, predictable texts with familiar vocabulary and supportive images, drawing on their developing knowledge of concepts about print and sound and letters. They identify the letters of the English alphabet and use the sounds represented by most letters. They listen to and use appropriate language features to respond to others in a familiar environment. They listen for rhyme, letter patterns and sounds in words.

Productive modes (speaking, writing and creating)

Students understand that their texts can reflect their own experiences. They identify and describe likes and dislikes about familiar texts, objects, characters and events.

In informal group and whole class settings, students communicate clearly. They retell events and experiences with peers and known adults. They identify and use rhyme, letter patterns and sounds in words. When writing, students use familiar words and phrases and images to convey ideas. Their writing shows evidence of sound and letter knowledge, beginning writing behaviours and experimentation with capital letters and full stops. They correctly form known upper- and lower-case letters.

YEAR 1

Lesson Structure

Reading & Viewing–Students participate in guided reading lessons four times a week. During these lessons students mix with the other year 1 classes, and are grouped according to their reading levels. In small groups, with the aid of the teacher, students are taught reading strategies to help develop their comprehension. These strategies are further reinforced with other activities.

Year 1 students practice reading their ‘THRASS hot words – level 2’ (high frequency words) daily. After lunch students participate in daily silent reading. During this time the teacher may choose to listen to children read individually, and provide feedback about their reading.

Writing – Students participate in daily writing activities and continue improving their basic sentence structure. They begin using capital letters and full stops in their writing. They begin implementing simple editing skills such as rereading their written work and finding ways to improve their writing. They are gradually introduced to various genres such as recount and procedure. They are exposed to the structure of these genres and the language features associated with the genres. Weekly handwriting sessions help in improving handwriting.

Speaking and Listening – Our Year 1 students develop their speaking skills daily with their peers and teachers. They present at weekly show-and-tell sessions and provide various oral presentations. They learn about the importance of facial expressions and gestures while presenting. They participate in discussions and listen effectively to others presenting.

Benchmarks and Recommendations

Reading and Viewing – It is recommended that Year 1s practice reading their ‘THRASS hot words – level 2’ (high frequency words) nightly. They should revise the Reception ‘THRASS hot words – level 1’ words also. When the child is confident reading all of the words in the Year 1 set, the teacher should be informed for testing to occur. Students will be allocated a reading level based on a Running Record assessment taken by the teacher. Students should read their reader to a proficient reader every night and be asked comprehension questions about the book. Students are tested once a term on their reading levels, however if the reader is too difficult or easy, the parent should inform the class teacher.

Writing – It is recommended that Year 1 students regularly practice handwriting and writing. Students should practice correct letter formation and size, and writing on the lines every night. It is important that students practice their spelling words and place them into sentences. The correct spelling of high frequency words should be practiced and emphasised.

Speaking and listening – It is beneficial for students to practice their oral presentations before they present them at school. Students should practice using a clear legible voice and speaking coherently. Students should be encouraged to provide detail and use adjectives in their speeches.

Year 1 Achievement Standard

Receptive modes (listening, reading and viewing)

By the end of Year 1, students understand the different purposes of texts. They make connections to personal experience when explaining characters and main events in short texts. They identify the language features, images and vocabulary used to describe characters and events.

Students read aloud, with developing fluency and intonation, short texts with some unfamiliar vocabulary, simple and compound sentences and supportive images. When reading, they use knowledge of sounds and letters, high frequency words, sentence boundary punctuation and directionality to make meaning. They recall key ideas and recognise literal and implied meaning in texts. They listen to others when taking part in conversations, using appropriate language features. They listen for and reproduce letter patterns and letter clusters.

Productive modes (speaking, writing and creating)

Students understand how characters in texts are developed and give reasons for personal preferences. They create texts that show understanding of the connection between writing, speech and images.

They create short texts for a small range of purposes. They interact in pair, group and class discussions, taking turns when responding. They make short presentations of a few connected sentences on familiar and learned topics. When writing, students provide details about ideas or events. They accurately spell words with regular spelling patterns and use capital letters and full stops. They correctly form all upper- and lower-case letters.

YEAR 2

Lesson Structure

Reading and Viewing –Our Year 2 students participate in guided reading lessons four times a week. During these lessons students mix with the other Year 2 classes, and are grouped according to their reading levels. In small groups, with the aid of the teacher, students are taught reading strategies to help develop their comprehension. These strategies are further reinforced with other activities.

Year 2 students practice reading their ‘THRASS hot words – level 3’ (high frequency words) daily. After lunch students participate in daily silent reading. During this time the teacher may choose to listen to children read individually, and provide feedback about their reading.

Writing – Year 2 students participate in daily writing activities and continue improving and enhancing their sentences. They accurately use the correct punctuation in their writing. They reread and begin to edit their written work to improve their spelling and sentence structure. They are introduced to various forms of genres such as exposition and reports. They are taught the structure of these genres and the language features associated with the genre. They continue improving their handwriting and have weekly handwriting lessons.

Speaking and Listening – Our Year 2 students enhance their speaking skills daily with their peers, teachers and the community. They are taught how to adapt their speeches based on which audience it will be directed to. They present at weekly show and tell sessions and provide various oral presentations. They participate in discussions and listen effectively to others presenting.

Benchmarks and Recommendations

Reading and viewing – It is recommended that Year 2 students practice reading their ‘THRASS hot words – level 3’ (high frequency words) nightly. They should revise the Reception and Year 1 ‘THRASS hot words – level 1 and 2’ words also. When the child is confident reading all of the words in the Year 2 set, the teacher should be informed for testing to occur. Students will be allocated a reading level based on a Running Record assessment taken by the teacher. Students should read their reader to a proficient reader every night and asked comprehension questions about the book. Students are tested once a term on their reading levels, however if the reader is too difficult or easy, the parent should inform the class teacher.

Writing – It is recommended that Year 2 students have regular practice handwriting and writing. Students should practice correct letter formation and size, and writing on the lines every night. It is important that students practice their spelling words and place them into sentences. The correct spelling of high frequency words should be practiced and emphasised.

Speaking and listening – It is beneficial for students to practice their oral presentations before they present them at school. Students should practice using a clear legible voice and speaking coherently. Students should be encouraged to provide detail and use adjectives in their speeches.

Year 2 Achievement Standard

Receptive modes (listening, reading and viewing)

By the end of Year 2, students understand how similar texts share characteristics by identifying text structures and language features used to describe characters, settings and events.

They read texts that contain varied sentence structures, some unfamiliar vocabulary, a significant number of high frequency sight words and images that provide additional information. They monitor meaning and self-correct using context, prior knowledge, punctuation, language and phonic knowledge. They identify literal and implied meaning, main ideas and supporting detail. Students make connections between texts by comparing content. They listen for particular purposes. They listen for and manipulate sound combinations and rhythmic sound patterns.

Productive modes (speaking, writing and creating)

When discussing their ideas and experiences, students use everyday language features and topic-specific vocabulary. They explain their preferences for aspects of texts using other texts as comparisons. They create texts that show how images support the meaning of the text.

Students create texts, drawing on their own experiences, their imagination and information they have learned. They use a variety of strategies to engage in group and class discussions and make presentations. They accurately spell familiar words and attempt to spell less familiar words and use punctuation accurately. They legibly write unjoined upper- and lower-case letters.

YEAR 3

The English curriculum is built around the three interrelated strands of Language, Literature and Literacy. Teaching and learning programs should balance and integrate all three strands. The focus is on developing students’ knowledge, understanding and skills in listening, reading, viewing, speaking, writing and creating.

Overview

In English, students explore a range of texts with different text structures, depending on purpose and audience. They learn how language features, images and vocabulary help to engage the interest of audiences. They then use appropriate language features, images and vocabulary to create structured texts that suit the purpose and audience. They also learn to describe literal and implied meaning using different reading strategies to connect ideas in different texts. They explain their preferences for particular texts and respond to other’s viewpoints. The range of literary texts comprises Australian literature, including the oral narrative traditions and contemporary literature of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples, and the classic and contemporary world literature, including texts from and about Asia. They make presentations and contribute actively to class and group discussions. They listen for significant points in discussions.

Lesson Structure

Reading and Viewing–Our Year 3 students participate in guided reading lessons four times a week. During these lessons students mix with the other Year 3 classes, and are grouped according to their reading levels. In small groups, with the aid of the teacher, students are taught reading strategies to help develop their comprehension. These strategies are further reinforced with other activities.

After lunch students participate in daily silent reading. During this time the teacher may choose to listen to children read individually, and provide feedback about their reading.

Writing – Our Year 3 students participate in daily writing activities and continue improving and enhancing their writing. They begin using paragraphs and edit their work for correct meaning, structure and spelling. They are introduced to various forms of genres such as exposition, reports and narratives. They are taught the structure of these genres and the language features associated with the genre. They are introduced to joined handwriting.

Speaking and Listening – Year 3 students communicate with their peers, teachers, the community and various schools via online or virtual environments. They are taught the various social conventions of speaking such as taking turns and how to address people. They present at weekly show-and-tell sessions and provide various oral presentations. They participate in discussions and listen effectively to others presenting.

Scope and Sequences

Garden College has an established genre scope and sequence which is followed when teaching English. Elements of Language, Literature and Literacy from the table below are integrated and taught through the genre focused on, throughout each unit.

Language  Literature Literacy
Language variation and change Literature and context Texts in context
Language for interaction Responding to literature Interacting with others
Text structure and organisation Examining literature Interpreting, analysing and evaluating
Expressing and developing ideas Creating literature Creating texts
Sound and letter knowledge

Content descriptors are online and will inform teacher’s programming

www.australiancurriculum.edu.au/English/Content-structure

Assessment

Assessment includes:

  • NAPLAN
  • Informal and formal running records
  • Ongoing checklists
  • Observations and Anecdotal notes
  • Portfolio, diaries, learning logs
  • Rubrics to assess skills and content
  • Comprehensive Assessment of Reading Strategies (CARS)

Resources

English Resources referenced regularly include:

  • THRASS handwriting booklet
  • 100 THRASS hot words flash cards
  • Running Records Benchmark Kit
  • IWB Flipchart on Garden Server
  • Word Up Spelling Book 3

Benchmarks and Recommendations

Reading and viewing – Year 3 students should continue reading the ‘THRASS hot words – levels 1- 3’ (high frequency words) regularly to ensure fluency. Students will be allocated a reading level based on a Running Record assessment taken by the teacher. Students should read their reader to a proficient reader every night and asked comprehension questions about the book. They are tested once a term on their reading levels, however if the reader is too difficult or easy, the parent should inform the class teacher.

Writing – It is recommended that Year 3 students regularly practice handwriting and writing at home. Students should practice correct letter formation, size, and writing on the lines using the joined handwriting. It is important that students practice their spelling words and place them into sentences. The correct spelling of high frequency words should be practiced and emphasised.

Speaking and listening – It is beneficial for students to practice their oral presentations before they present them at school. Students should practice using a clear legible voice and speaking coherently. Students should be encouraged to provide detail and use adjectives in their speeches.

Year 3 Achievement Standard

Receptive modes (listening, reading and viewing)

By the end of Year 3, students understand how content can be organised using different text structures depending on the purpose of the text. They understand how language features, images and vocabulary choices are used for different effects.

They read texts that contain varied sentence structures, a range of punctuation conventions, and images that provide additional information. They identify literal and implied meaning connecting ideas in different parts of a text. They select information, ideas and events in texts that relate to their own lives and to other texts. They listen to others’ views and respond appropriately.

Productive modes (speaking, writing and creating)

Students understand how language features are used to link and sequence ideas. They understand how language can be used to express feelings and opinions on topics. Their texts include writing and images to express and develop in some detail experiences, events, information, ideas and characters.

Students create a range of texts for familiar and unfamiliar audiences. They contribute actively to class and group discussions, asking questions, providing useful feedback and making presentations. They demonstrate understanding of grammar and choose vocabulary and punctuation appropriate to the purpose and context of their writing. They use knowledge of sounds and high frequency words to spell words accurately, checking their work for meaning. They write using joined letters that are accurately formed and consistent in size.

YEAR 4

The English curriculum is built around the three interrelated strands of Language, Literature and Literacy. Teaching and learning programs should balance and integrate all three strands. The focus is on developing students’ knowledge, understanding and skills in listening, reading, viewing, speaking, writing and creating.

Overview

In English, students explore a range of texts with different text structures, depending on purpose and audience. They learn how language features, images and vocabulary help to engage the interest of audiences. They then use appropriate language features, images and vocabulary to create structured texts that suit the purpose and audience. They also learn to describe literal and implied meaning using different reading strategies to connect ideas in different texts. They explain their preferences for particular texts and respond to other’s viewpoints. The range of literary texts comprises Australian literature, including the oral narrative traditions and contemporary literature of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples, and the classic and contemporary world literature, including texts from and about Asia. They make presentations and contribute actively to class and group discussions. They listen for significant points in discussions.

Lesson Structure

In Year 4, students actively participate in Shared Reading Sessions as well as Reciprocal/Guided Reading Sessions. These sessions usually take place in the morning and include reading and writing. When students are doing guided reading, they are exposed to reading cues, word study and grammar skills. Reading strategies are taught explicitly through the CARS and STARS program and the implementation of reciprocal reading teaches students to use reading comprehension strategies independently. These strategies include text prediction, summarisation, question generation and clarification of unknown or unclear content. During writing sessions students practice handwriting and are also exposed to different text types such as narrative, recount, explanation and procedure throughout the year.

Scope and Sequences

Garden College has an established genre scope and sequence which is followed when teaching English. Elements of Language, Literature and Literacy from the table below are integrated and taught through the genre focused on, throughout each unit.

Language Literature Literacy 
Language variation and change Literature and context Texts in context
Language for interaction Responding to literature Interacting with others
Text structure and organisation Examining literature Interpreting, analysing and evaluating
Expressing and developing ideas Creating literature Creating texts
Sound and letter knowledge

Content descriptors are online and will inform teacher’s programming

www.australiancurriculum.edu.au/English/Content-structure

Assessment

Assessment includes:

  • PROBE Comprehension assessments
  • Ongoing checklists
  • Observations and Anecdotal notes
  • Portfolio
  • Rubrics to assess skills and content
  • Comprehensive Assessment of Reading Strategies (CARS)

Resources

English Resources referenced regularly include:

  • CARS and STARS
  • Grammar through text types
  • English for a Purpose
  • IWB Flipchart on Garden Server
  • Word Up Spelling Book 4

Benchmarks and Recommendations

Writing – In Year 4, students are expected to write two examples of a genre each term, with one of the work samples integrated into their Inquiry topic.

Spelling – Students are expected to learn the spelling patterns of up to 15 words each week and are expected to be able to demonstrate correct spelling of all common words in their writing.

Reading – Students are expected to be able to read a variety of texts independently in Year 4.

Year 4 Achievement Standard

Receptive modes (listening, reading and viewing)

By the end of Year 4, students understand that texts have different text structures depending on purpose and audience. They explain how language features, images and vocabulary are used to engage the interest of audiences.

They describe literal and implied meaning connecting ideas in different texts. They express preferences for particular texts, and respond to others’ viewpoints. They listen for key points in discussions.

Productive modes (speaking, writing and creating)

Students use language features to create coherence and add detail to their texts. They understand how to express an opinion based on information in a text. They create texts that show understanding of how images and detail can be used to extend key ideas.

Students create structured texts to explain ideas for different audiences. They make presentations and contribute actively to class and group discussions, varying language according to context. They demonstrate understanding of grammar, select vocabulary from a range of resources and use accurate spelling and punctuation, editing their work to improve meaning.

YEAR 5

The English curriculum is built around the three interrelated strands of Language, Literature and Literacy. Teaching and learning programs should balance and integrate all three strands. The focus is on developing students’ knowledge, understanding and skills in listening, reading, viewing, speaking, writing and creating.

Overview

In English, students explore a range of texts with different text structures, depending on purpose and audience. They learn how language features, images and vocabulary help to engage the interest of audiences. They then use appropriate language features, images and vocabulary to create structured texts that suit the purpose and audience. They also learn to describe literal and implied meaning using different reading strategies to connect ideas in different texts. They explain their preferences for particular texts and respond to other’s viewpoints. The range of literary texts comprises Australian literature, including the oral narrative traditions and contemporary literature of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples, and the classic and contemporary world literature, including texts from and about Asia. They make presentations and contribute actively to class and group discussions. They listen for significant points in discussions.

Lesson Structure

In Year 5, students actively participate in Shared Reading Sessions as well as Reciprocal/Guided Reading Sessions. These sessions usually take place in the morning and include reading and writing. When students are doing guided reading, they are exposed to reading cues, word study and grammar skills. Reading strategies are taught explicitly through the CARS and STARS program and the implementation of reciprocal reading teaches students to use reading comprehension strategies independently. These strategies include text prediction, summarisation, question generation and clarification of unknown or unclear content. During writing sessions students practice handwriting and are also exposed to different text types such as narrative, recount, explanation, persuasive and procedure throughout the year.

Scope and Sequences

Garden College has an established genre scope and sequence which is followed when teaching English. Elements of Language, Literature and Literacy from the table below are integrated and taught through the genre focused on, throughout each unit.

Language Literature Literacy 
Language variation and change Literature and context Texts in context
Language for interaction Responding to literature Interacting with others
Text structure and organisation Examining literature Interpreting, analysing and evaluating
Expressing and developing ideas Creating literature Creating texts
Sound and letter knowledge

Content descriptors are online and will inform teacher’s programming

www.australiancurriculum.edu.au/English/Content-structure

Assessment

Assessment includes:

  • NAPLAN
  • PROBE Comprehension assessments
  • Ongoing checklists
  • Observations and Anecdotal notes
  • Portfolio
  • Rubrics to assess skills and content
  • Comprehensive Assessment of Reading Strategies (CARS)

Resources

English Resources referenced regularly include:

  • CARS and STARS
  • Australian Curriculum aligned resources from Professional Development sessions and online sources
  • IWB Flipchart on the Garden Server
  • Word Up Spelling Book 5

Benchmarks and Recommendations

Writing – In Year 5, students are expected to write two examples of a genre each term, with one of the work samples integrated into their Inquiry topic.

Spelling – Students are expected to learn the spelling patterns of up to 15 words each week and are expected to be able to demonstrate correct spelling of all common words and some complex words in their writing.

Reading –The expected reading level at the end of grade 3 is level 30 +, which assumes independent reading across a variety of texts.

Year 5 Achievement Standard

Receptive modes (listening, reading and viewing)

By the end of Year 5, students explain how text structures assist in understanding the text. They understand how language features, images and vocabulary influence interpretations of characters, settings and events.

They analyse and explain literal and implied information from a variety of texts. They describe how events, characters and settings in texts are depicted and explain their own responses to them. They listen and ask questions to clarify content.

Productive modes (speaking, writing and creating)

Students use language features to show how ideas can be extended. They develop and explain a point of view about a text, selecting information, ideas and images from a range of resources.

Students create a variety of sequenced texts for different purposes and audiences. They make presentations and contribute actively to class and group discussions, taking into account other perspectives. When writing, they demonstrate understanding of grammar, select specific vocabulary and use accurate spelling and punctuation, editing their work to provide structure and meaning.

YEAR 6

The English curriculum is built around the three interrelated strands of Language, Literature and Literacy. Teaching and learning programs should balance and integrate all three strands. The focus is on developing students’ knowledge, understanding and skills in listening, reading, viewing, speaking, writing and creating.

Overview

In English, students explore a range of texts with different text structures, depending on purpose and audience. They learn how language features, images and vocabulary help to engage the interest of audiences. They then use appropriate language features, images and vocabulary to create structured texts that suit the purpose and audience. They also learn to describe literal and implied meaning using different reading strategies to connect ideas in different texts. They explain their preferences for particular texts and respond to other’s viewpoints. The range of literary texts comprises Australian literature, including the oral narrative traditions and contemporary literature of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples, and the classic and contemporary world literature, including texts from and about Asia. They make presentations and contribute actively to class and group discussions. They listen for significant points in discussions.

Lesson Structure

In Year 6, students actively participate in Shared Reading Sessions as well as Reciprocal/Guided Reading Sessions. These sessions usually take place in the morning and include reading and writing. When students are doing guided reading, they are exposed to reading cues, word study and grammar skills. Reading strategies are taught explicitly through the CARS and STARS program and the implementation of reciprocal reading teaches students to use reading comprehension strategies independently. These strategies include text prediction, summarisation, question generation and clarification of unknown or unclear content. During writing sessions students practice handwriting and are also exposed to different text types such as narrative, recount, explanation and procedure throughout the year.

Word study and grammar skills will be focused on a weekly basis and students will focus on weekly spelling words which are used during mathematics classes and science classes. During grammar classes, students become very familiar with various nouns, adjectives, verbs, adverbs, clauses and other language features relevant to the texts they are learning about.

Students are exposed to two novels (Island or the Blue Dolphin and Two Hands Together) throughout the year, which are read as a whole class and followed through with activities. This explicit reading allows students to ask questions promptly on aspects of the chapter they haven’t understood and consolidates their comprehension and vocabulary skills.

Scope and Sequences

Garden College has an established genre scope and sequence which is followed when teaching English. Elements of Language, Literature and Literacy from the table below are integrated and taught through the genre focused on, throughout each unit.

Language Literature Literacy 
Language variation and change Literature and context Texts in context
Language for interaction Responding to literature Interacting with others
Text structure and organisation Examining literature Interpreting, analysing and evaluating
Expressing and developing ideas Creating literature Creating texts
Sound and letter knowledge

Content descriptors are online and will inform teacher’s programming

www.australiancurriculum.edu.au/English/Content-structure

Assessment

Assessment includes:

  • PROBE Comprehension assessments
  • Ongoing checklists
  • Observations and Anecdotal notes
  • Portfolio
  • Rubrics to assess skills and content
  • Comprehensive Assessment of Reading Strategies (CARS)

Resources

English Resources referenced regularly include:

  • CARS and STARS
  • Grammar through text types
  • English for a Purpose
  • IWB Flipchart on Garden Server
  • Word Up Spelling Book 6

Benchmarks and Recommendations

Writing – In Year 6, students are expected to write two examples of a genre each term, with one of the work samples integrated into their Inquiry topic.

Spelling – Students are expected to learn the spelling patterns of up to 15 words each week and are expected to be able to demonstrate correct spelling of all common words and some complex words in their writing.

Reading – Students are expected to be reading novels independently in year 6.

Year 6 Achievement Standard

Receptive modes (listening, reading and viewing)

By the end of Year 6, students understand how the use of text structures can achieve particular effects. They analyse and explain how language features, images and vocabulary are used by different authors to represent ideas, characters and events.

Students compare and analyse information in different texts, explaining literal and implied meaning. They select and use evidence from a text to explain their response to it. They listen to discussions, clarifying content and challenging others’ ideas.

Productive modes (speaking, writing and creating)

Students understand how language features and language patterns can be used for emphasis. They show how specific details can be used to support a point of view. They explain how their choices of language features and images are used.

Students create detailed texts elaborating on key ideas for a range of purposes and audiences. They make presentations and contribute actively to class and group discussions, using a variety of strategies for effect. They demonstrate understanding of grammar, make considered choices from an expanding vocabulary, use accurate spelling and punctuation for clarity and make and explain editorial choices.

YEAR-Reception (FOUNDATION)

Mathematics at Garden College provides students with essential mathematical skills and knowledge in Number and Algebra, Measurement and Geometry, and Statistics and Probability. It develops the numeracy capabilities that all students need in their personal, work and civic life, and provides the fundamentals on which mathematical specialties and professional applications of mathematics are built.

Overview

The Mathematics curriculum at Garden College aims to ensure that all students benefit from access to the power of mathematical reasoning and learn to apply mathematical understandings creatively and efficiently. Skills are developed through a range of open ended and interactive activities using concrete materials. This includes games, hands on activities, formal procedures and problem solving tasks. Lower Primary classes use the ‘Early Years Numeracy Program’ in which each individual student’s strengths and weaknesses are assessed and built upon. All areas of Mathematics are covered each term, throughout the year.

Lesson Structure

During Mathematics sessions, the classroom is set up with enough floor space to allow interactive and engaging tuning in sessions to introduce new topics. The tables are set up in groups to allow flexibility to work both individually and in mixed ability groups, depending on what is required for that lesson. In a typical lesson, students are introduced to the Mathematical concept, actively take part in an opening activity are exposed to focus words for that concept and complete an individual or group task to consolidate the Mathematical skills and understanding relevant to that lesson.

Assessment

Assessment includes:

  • Teacher observations – ongoing
  • Anecdotal notes – ongoing
  • Topical Tests and the Early Years Numeracy Test – 1st and 3rd Term

Resources

Mathematics resources referenced regularly include:

  • iMaths
  • Interactive Australian Curriculum aligned websites such as Scootle and Studyladder

Benchmarks and Recommendations

Numeracy Week is a celebration of our mathematical skills in the real world. Each year, different activities are planned for different year levels and are often tied in with current affairs, such as the Olympics. This provides an enjoyable and valuable learning foundation for the whole school community. To ensure that students develop Mathematics concepts with confidence, the following skills are taught and emphasized very early in the year:

  • Counting from 1-20 verbally and recognising and writing 1-10
  • Recognising shapes & colours
  • Identifying Heavy/light/long/short
  • Adding and subtracting a collection of simple objects
  • Using position language to identify location

Foundation/Reception Year Achievement Standard

By the end of the Foundation year, students make connections between number names, numerals and quantities up to 10. They compare objects using mass, length and capacity. Students connect events and the days of the week. They explain the order and duration of events. They use appropriate language to describe location.

Students count to and from 20 and order small collections. They group objects based on common characteristics and sort shapes and objects. Students answer simple questions to collect information.

Australian Curriculum Achievement Levels

Year 1

The Mathematics curriculum at Garden College aims to ensure that all students benefit from access to the power of mathematical reasoning and learn to apply mathematical understandings creatively and efficiently. Skills are developed through a range of open ended and interactive activities using concrete materials. This includes games, hands on activities, formal procedures and problem solving tasks. Lower Primary classes use the ‘Early Years Numeracy Program’ in which each individual student’s strengths and weaknesses are assessed and built upon.

Lesson Structure

During Mathematics sessions, the classroom is set up with enough floor space to allow interactive and engaging tuning in sessions to introduce new topics. The tables are set up in groups to allow flexibility to work both individually and in mixed ability groups, depending on what is required for that lesson. In a typical lesson, students are introduced to the Mathematical concept, actively take part in an opening activity are exposed to focus words for that concept and complete an individual or group task to consolidate the Mathematical skills and understanding relevant to that lesson.

Scope and Sequences

In year 1, there is a focus on developing the following abilities throughout the year:

Understanding Fluency Problem Solving Reasoning
includes connecting names, numerals and quantities, and partitioning numbers in various ways Includes counting numbers in sequences readily forward and backwards, locating numbers on a line, and naming the days of the week includes using materials to model authentic problems, giving and receiving directions to unfamiliar places, and using familiar counting sequences to solve unfamiliar problems and discussing the reasonableness of the answer includes explaining direct and indirect comparisons of length using uniform informal units, justifying representations of data, and explaining patterns that have been created

Assessment

Assessment includes:

  • Teacher observations – ongoing
  • Anecdotal notes – ongoing
  • Topical Tests and the Early Years Numeracy Test – 1st and 3rd Term

Resources

Mathematics resources referenced regularly include:

  • iMaths
  • Interactive Australian Curriculum aligned websites such as Scootle and Studyladder

Benchmarks and Recommendations

By the end of Year 1, it is recommended that students describe number sequences resulting from skip counting by 2s, 5s and 10s. They identify representations of one half. They recognise Australian coins according to their value. Students explain time durations. They describe two-dimensional shapes and three-dimensional objects. Students describe data displays.

 

Students count to and from 100 and locate numbers on a number line. They carry out simple additions and subtractions using counting strategies. They partition numbers using place value. They continue simple patterns involving numbers and objects. Students order objects based on lengths and capacities using informal units. They tell time to the half hour. They use the language of direction to move from place to place. Students classify outcomes of simple familiar events. They collect data by asking questions and draw simple data displays.

Year 1 Achievement Standard

By the end of Year 1, students describe number sequences resulting from skip counting by 2s, 5s and 10s. They identifyrepresentations of one half. They recognise Australian coins according to their value. Students explain time durations. They describe two-dimensional shapes and three-dimensional objects. Students describe data displays.

Students count to and from 100 and locate numbers on a number line. They carry out simple additions and subtractions using counting strategies. They partition numbers using place value. They continue simple patterns involving numbers and objects. Students order objects based on lengths and capacities using informal units. They tell time to the half hour. They use the language of direction to move from place to place. Students classify outcomes of simple familiar events. They collect data by asking questions and draw simple data displays.

Year 2

Mathematics at Garden College provides students with essential mathematical skills and knowledge in Number and AlgebraMeasurement and Geometry, and Statistics and Probability. It develops the numeracy capabilities that all students need in their personal, work and civic life, and provides the fundamentals on which mathematical specialties and professional applications of mathematics are built.

Overview

The Mathematics curriculum at Garden College aims to ensure that all students benefit from access to the power of mathematical reasoning and learn to apply mathematical understandings creatively and efficiently. Skills are developed through a range of open ended and interactive activities using concrete materials. This includes games, hands on activities, formal procedures and problem solving tasks. Lower Primary classes use the ‘Early Years Numeracy Program’ in which each individual student’s strengths and weaknesses are assessed and built upon.

Lesson Structure

During Mathematics sessions, the classroom is set up with enough floor space to allow interactive and engaging tuning in sessions to introduce new topics. The tables are set up in groups to allow flexibility to work both individually and in mixed ability groups, depending on what is required for that lesson. In a typical lesson, students are introduced to the Mathematical concept, actively take part in an opening activity are exposed to focus words for that concept and complete an individual or group task to consolidate the Mathematical skills and understanding relevant to that lesson.

Scope and Sequences

In Year 2, there is a focus on developing the following abilities throughout the year:

Understanding Fluency Problem Solving Reasoning
includes connecting number calculations with counting sequences, partitioning and combining numbers flexibly, identifying and describing the relationship between addition and subtraction and between multiplication and division includes counting numbers in sequences readily, using informal units iteratively to compare measurements, using the language of chance to describe outcomes of familiar chance events and describing and comparing time durations includes formulating problems from authentic situations, making models and using number sentences that represent problem situations, and matching transformations with their original shape includes using known facts to derive strategies for unfamiliar calculations, comparing and contrasting related models of operations, and creating and interpreting simple representations of data

Assessment

Assessment includes:

  • Teacher observations – ongoing
  • Anecdotal notes – ongoing
  • Topical Tests and the Early Years Numeracy Test – 1st and 3rd Term

Resources

Mathematics resources referenced regularly include:

  • iMaths
  • Interactive Australian Curriculum aligned websites such as Scootle and Studyladder

Benchmarks and Recommendations

By the end of Year 2, it is recommended that students recognise increasing and decreasing number sequences involving 2s, 3s and 5s. They represent multiplication and division by grouping into sets. They associate collections of Australian coins with their value. Students identify the missing element in a number sequence. Students recognise the features of three-dimensional objects. They interpret simple maps of familiar locations. They explain the effects of one-step transformations. Students make sense of collected information.

Students count to and from 1000. They perform simple addition and subtraction calculations using a range of strategies. They divide collections and shapes into halves, quarters and eighths. Students order shapes and objects using informal units. They tell time to the quarter hour and use a calendar to identify the date and the months included in seasons. They draw two- dimensional shapes. They describe outcomes for everyday events. Students collect data from relevant questions to create lists, tables and picture graphs.

Year 2 Achievement Standard

By the end of Year 2, students recognise increasing and decreasing number sequences involving 2s, 3s and 5s. They represent multiplication and division by grouping into sets. They associate collections of Australian coins with their value. Students identify the missing element in a number sequence. Students recognise the features of three-dimensional objects. They interpret simple maps of familiar locations. They explain the effects of one-step transformations. Students make sense of collected information.

Students count to and from 1000. They perform simple addition and subtraction calculations using a range of strategies. They divide collections and shapes into halves, quarters and eighths. Students order shapes and objects using informal units. They tell time to the quarter hour and use a calendar to identify the date and the months included in seasons. They draw two- dimensional shapes. They describe outcomes for everyday events. Students collect data from relevant questions to create lists, tables and picture graphs.

Year 3

Overview

The Mathematics curriculum at Garden College aims to ensure that all students benefit from access to the power of mathematical reasoning and learn to apply mathematical understandings creatively and efficiently. Skills are developed through a range of open ended and interactive activities using concrete materials. This includes games, hands on activities, formal procedures and problem solving tasks. Lower Primary classes use the ‘Early Years Numeracy Program’ in which each individual student’s strengths and weaknesses are assessed and built upon.

Lesson Structure

During Mathematics sessions, the classroom is set up with enough floor space to allow interactive and engaging tuning in sessions to introduce new topics. The tables are set up in groups to allow flexibility to work both individually and in mixed ability groups, depending on what is required for that lesson. In a typical lesson, students are introduced to the Mathematical concept, actively take part in an opening activity are exposed to focus words for that concept and complete an individual or group task to consolidate the Mathematical skills and understanding relevant to that lesson.

Scope and Sequences

In Year 3, there is a focus on developing the following abilities throughout the year:

Understanding Fluency Problem Solving Reasoning
includes connecting number representations with number sequences, partitioning and combining numbers flexibly, representing unit fractions, using appropriate language to communicate times, and identifying environmental symmetry includes recalling multiplication facts, using familiar metric units to order and compare objects, identifying and describing outcomes of chance experiments, interpreting maps and communicating positions includes formulating and modelling authentic situations involving planning methods of data collection and representation, making models of three-dimensional objects and using number properties to continue number patterns includes using generalising from number properties and results of calculations, comparing angles, creating and interpreting variations in the results of data collections and data displays

Assessment

Assessment includes:

  • NAPLAN
  • Teacher observations – ongoing
  • Anecdotal notes – ongoing
  • Topical Tests and Nelson Numeracy Assessments

Resources

Mathematics resources referenced regularly include:

  • iMaths
  • Interactive Australian Curriculum aligned websites such as Scootle and Studyladder

Benchmarks and Recommendations

By the end of Year 3, students recognise the connection between addition and subtraction and solve problems using efficient strategies for multiplication. They model and represent unit fractions. They represent money values in various ways. Students identify symmetry in the environment. They match positions on maps with given information. Students recognise angles in real situations. They interpret and compare data displays.

Students count to and from 10 000. They classify numbers as either odd or even. They recall addition and multiplication facts for single digit numbers. Students correctly count out change from financial transactions. They continue number patterns involving addition and subtraction. Students use metric units for length, mass and capacity. They tell time to the nearest minute. Students make models of three-dimensional objects. Students conduct chance experiments and list possible outcomes. They carry out simple data investigations for categorical

Year 3 Achievement Standard

By the end of Year 3, students recognise the connection between addition and subtraction and solve problems using efficient strategies for multiplication. They model and represent unit fractions. They represent money values in various ways. Students identify symmetry in the environment. They match positions on maps with given information. Students recognise angles in real situations. They interpret and compare data displays.

Students count to and from 10 000. They classify numbers as either odd or even. They recall addition and multiplication facts for single digit numbers. Students correctly count out change from financial transactions. They continue number patterns involving addition and subtraction. Students use metric units for length, mass and capacity. They tell time to the nearest minute. Students make models of three-dimensional objects. Students conduct chance experiments and list possible outcomes. They carry out simple data investigations for categorical variables.

Year 4

Overview

The Mathematics curriculum at Garden College aims to ensure that all students benefit from access to the power of mathematical reasoning and learn to apply mathematical understandings creatively and efficiently. Skills are developed through a range of open ended and interactive activities using concrete materials. This includes games, hands on activities, formal procedures and problem solving tasks. Lower Primary classes use the ‘Early Years Numeracy Program’ in which each individual student’s strengths and weaknesses are assessed and built upon.

Lesson Structure

During Mathematics sessions, the classroom is set up with enough floor space to allow interactive and engaging tuning in sessions to introduce new topics. The tables are set up in groups to allow flexibility to work both individually and in mixed ability groups, depending on what is required for that lesson. In a typical lesson, students are introduced to the Mathematical concept, actively take part in an opening activity are exposed to focus words for that concept and complete an individual or group task to consolidate the Mathematical skills and understanding relevant to that lesson.

Scope and Sequences

In year 4, there is a focus on developing the following abilities throughout the year:

Understanding Fluency Problem Solving Reasoning
includes making connections between representations of numbers, partitioning and combining numbers flexibly, extending place value to decimals, using appropriate language to communicate times, and describing properties of symmetrical shapes includes recalling multiplication tables, communicating sequences of simple fractions, using instruments to measure accurately, creating patterns with shapes and their transformations, and collecting and recording data includes formulating, modelling and recording authentic situations involving operations, comparing large numbers with each other, comparing time durations, and using properties of numbers to continue patterns includes using generalising from number properties and results of calculations, deriving strategies for unfamiliar multiplication and division tasks, comparing angles, communicating information using graphical displays and evaluating the appropriateness of different displays

Assessment

Assessment includes:

  • Teacher observations – ongoing
  • Anecdotal notes – ongoing
  • Topical Tests and Nelson Numeracy Assessments

Resources

Mathematics resources referenced regularly include:

  • iMaths
  • Interactive Australian Curriculum aligned websites such as Scootle and Studyladder

Benchmarks and Recommendations

By the end of Year 4, students should be able to choose appropriate strategies for calculations involving multiplication and division. They recognise common equivalent fractions in familiar contexts and make connections between fraction and decimal notations up to two decimal places. Students solve simple purchasing problems. They identify unknown quantities in number sentences. They describe number patterns resulting from multiplication. Students compare areas of regular and irregular shapes using informal units. They solve problems involving time duration. They interpret information contained in maps. Students identify dependent and independent events. They describe different methods for data collection and representation, and evaluate their effectiveness.

Students need to be able to recall multiplication facts to 10 x 10 and related division facts. Students are expected to locate familiar fractions on a number line. They continue number sequences involving multiples of single digit numbers. Students use scaled instruments to measure temperatures, lengths, shapes and objects. They convert between units of time. Students create symmetrical shapes and patterns. They classify angles in relation to a right angle. Students list the probabilities of everyday events. They construct data displays from given or collected data.

Year 4 Achievement Standard

By the end of Year 4, students choose appropriate strategies for calculations involving multiplication and division. They recognise common equivalent fractions in familiar contexts and make connections between fraction and decimal notations up to two decimal places. Students solve simple purchasing problems. They identify unknown quantities in number sentences. They describe number patterns resulting from multiplication. Students compare areas of regular and irregular shapes using informal units. They solve problems involving time duration. They interpret information contained in maps. Students identifydependent and independent events. They describe different methods for data collection and representation, and evaluatetheir effectiveness.

Students use the properties of odd and even numbers. They recall multiplication facts to 10 x 10 and related division facts. Students locate familiar fractions on a number line. They continue number sequences involving multiples of single digit numbers. Students use scaled instruments to measure temperatures, lengths, shapes and objects. They convert between units of time. Students create symmetrical shapes and patterns. They classify angles in relation to a right angle. Students list the probabilities of everyday events. They construct data displays from given or collected data.

Year 5

Overview

The Mathematics curriculum at Garden College aims to ensure that all students benefit from access to the power of mathematical reasoning and learn to apply mathematical understandings creatively and efficiently. Skills are developed through a range of open ended and interactive activities using concrete materials. This includes games, hands on activities, formal procedures and problem solving tasks. Lower Primary classes use the ‘Early Years Numeracy Program’ in which each individual student’s strengths and weaknesses are assessed and built upon.

Lesson Structure

During Mathematics sessions, the classroom is set up with enough floor space to allow interactive and engaging tuning in sessions to introduce new topics. In a typical lesson, students are introduced to the Mathematical concept, actively take part in an opening activity are exposed to focus words for that concept and complete an individual or group task to consolidate the Mathematical skills and understanding relevant to that lesson.

Scope and Sequences

In Year 5, there is a focus on developing the following abilities throughout the year:

Understanding Fluency Problem Solving Reasoning
includes making connections between representations of numbers, using fractions to represent probabilities, comparing and ordering fractions and decimals and representing them in various ways, describing transformations and identifying line and rotational symmetry includes choosing appropriate units of measurement for calculation of perimeter and area, using estimation to check the reasonableness of answers to calculations and using instruments to measure angles includes formulating and solving authentic problems using whole numbers and measurements and creating financial plans includes investigating strategies to perform calculations efficiently, continuing patterns involving fractions and decimals, interpreting results of chance experiments,  posing appropriate questions for data investigations and interpreting data sets

Assessment

Assessment includes:

  • NAPLAN
  • Teacher observations – ongoing
  • Anecdotal notes – ongoing
  • Topical Tests and Nelson Numeracy Assessments

Resources

Mathematics resources referenced regularly include:

  • iMaths
  • Interactive Australian Curriculum aligned websites such as Scootle and Studyladder

Benchmarks and Recommendations

By the end of Year 5, students are expected to be able to solve simple problems involving the four operations using a range of strategies. They check the reasonableness of answers using estimation and rounding. Students identify and describe factors and multiples. Students order decimals and unit fractions and locate them on number lines. They compute with fractions and decimals. They use appropriate units of measurement for length, area, volume, capacity and mass, and calculate perimeter and area of rectangles. They convert between 12 and 24 hour time and use a grid reference system to locate landmarks. They measure and construct different angles.

Year 5 Achievement Standard

By the end of Year 5, students solve simple problems involving the four operations using a range of strategies. They check the reasonableness of answers using estimation and rounding. Students identify and describe factors and multiples. They explain plans for simple budgets. Students connect three-dimensional objects with their two-dimensional representations. They describe transformations of two-dimensional shapes and identify line and rotational symmetry. Students compare and interpret different data sets.

Students order decimals and unit fractions and locate them on number lines. They add and subtract fractions with the same denominator. Students continue patterns by adding and subtracting fractions and decimals. They find unknown quantities in number sentences. They use appropriate units of measurement for length, area, volume, capacity and mass, and calculate perimeter and area of rectangles. They convert between 12 and 24 hour time. Students use a grid reference system to locatelandmarks. They measure and construct different angles. Students list outcomes of chance experiments with equally likely outcomes and assign probabilities between 0 and 1. Students pose questions to gather data, and construct data displays appropriate for the data.

Year 6

Overview

The Mathematics curriculum at Garden College aims to ensure that all students benefit from access to the power of mathematical reasoning and learn to apply mathematical understandings creatively and efficiently. Skills are developed through a range of open ended and interactive activities using concrete materials. This includes games, hands on activities, formal procedures and problem solving tasks. Lower Primary classes use the ‘Early Years Numeracy Program’ in which each individual student’s strengths and weaknesses are assessed and built upon.

Lesson Structure

During Mathematics sessions, the classroom is set up with enough floor space to allow interactive and engaging tuning in sessions to introduce new topics. The tables are set up in groups to allow flexibility to work both individually and in mixed ability groups, depending on what is required for that lesson. In a typical lesson, students are introduced to the Mathematical concept, actively take part in an opening activity are exposed to focus words for that concept and complete an individual or group task to consolidate the Mathematical skills and understanding relevant to that lesson.

Scope and Sequences

In year 6, there is a focus on developing the following abilities throughout the year:

Understanding Fluency Problem Solving Reasoning
includes describing properties of different sets of numbers, using fractions and decimals to describe probabilities, representing fractions and decimals in various ways and describing connections between them, and making reasonable estimations includes representing   integers on a number line, calculating simple percentages, using brackets appropriately, converting between fractions and decimals, using operations with fractions, decimals and percentages, measuring using metric units, and interpreting timetables includes formulating and solving authentic problems using fractions, decimals, percentages and measurements,  interpreting secondary data displays, and  finding the size of unknown angles includes explaining mental strategies for performing calculations, describing results for continuing number sequences, explaining the transformations of one shape into another, explaining why the actual results of chance experiments may differ from expected results

Assessment

Assessment includes:

  • Teacher observations – ongoing
  • Anecdotal notes – ongoing
  • Topical Tests and Nelson Numeracy Assessments

Resources

Mathematics resources referenced regularly include:

  • iMaths
  • Interactive Australian Curriculum aligned websites such as Scootle and Studyladder

Benchmarks and Recommendations

By the end of Year 6, students recognise the properties of prime, composite, square and triangular numbers. They describe the use of integers in everyday contexts. They solve problems involving all four operations with whole numbers. Students connect fractions, decimals and percentages as different representations of the same number and compute with them. Students make connections between the powers of 10 and the multiplication and division of decimals. Students connect decimal representations to the metric system and choose appropriate units of measurement to perform a calculation.

 

Students are also expected to be able to calculate a simple fraction of a quantity add, subtract and multiply decimals and divide decimals where the result is rational. Students should also be able to locate an ordered pair in any one of the four quadrants on the Cartesian plane.

Year 6 Achievement Standard

By the end of Year 6, students recognise the properties of prime, composite, square and triangular numbers. They describethe use of integers in everyday contexts. They solve problems involving all four operations with whole numbers. Students connect fractions, decimals and percentages as different representations of the same number. They solve problems involving the addition and subtraction of related fractions. Students make connections between the powers of 10 and the multiplication and division of decimals. They describe rules used in sequences involving whole numbers, fractions and decimals. Students connect decimal representations to the metric system and choose appropriate units of measurement to perform a calculation. They make connections between capacity and volume. They solve problems involving length and area. They interpret timetables. Students describe combinations of transformations. They solve problems using the properties of angles. Students compare observed and expected frequencies. They interpret and compare a variety of data displays including those displays for two categorical variables. They evaluate secondary data displayed in the media.

Students locate fractions and integers on a number line. They calculate a simple fraction of a quantity. They add, subtract and multiply decimals and divide decimals where the result is rational. Students calculate common percentage discounts on sale items. They write correct number sentences using brackets and order of operations. Students locate an ordered pair in any one of the four quadrants on the Cartesian plane. They construct simple prisms and pyramids. Students list and communicate probabilities using simple fractions, decimals and percentages.

Year-Reception (FOUNDATION)

Overview

Through the learning of Science, students are given the opportunities to develop an understanding of important Science concepts and processes, the practices used to develop scientific knowledge, Science’s contribution to our culture and society and Science’s applications in our lives. The Science Curriculum at Garden College aims to improve students’ inquiry skills, general knowledge of Science or ‘Scientific Literacy’ and their understanding of Science as a human endeavor by highlighting different approaches to a scientific view of the world.

Lesson Structure

Science lessons at Garden College are taught using an integrated inquiry model. The lessons aim to engage students with hands on experiences and activities that encourage them to ask questions and with support, discover ways of finding answers to their enquiries. Incursions and excursions that focus on assisting students to make sense of the Science in their lives and around them are organised and complement, as well as contribute to the teaching of Science at Garden College.

Scope and Sequence

Throughout Science at Garden College, students learn that observations can be organised to reveal patterns and that these patterns can be used to make predictions about phenomena. In Reception, students observe and describe the behaviours and properties of everyday objects, materials and living things. They explore changes in the world around them, including changes that impact on them with the following scope and sequence of topics:

Reception Science Scope and Sequence
Term 1 Term 2 Term 3 Term 4
Habitats and Homes Weather Forecast What I need to survive Move it

Assessment

Assessment includes:

  • Diagnostic assessment during the engage phase of the unit to gauge student understandings
  • Ongoing anecdotal notes/checklist of the skills attained
  • Projects with attached rubrics
  • Formal and informal summative topic tests

Resources

Primary Connections units are the primary resource referenced when planning for Science at Garden College. Incursions and excursions relevant to the topics being taught are also valuable and complement the understandings that are being developed.

Benchmarks and Recommendations

Garden College aims to engage students in Science topics and then set up learning experiences where students are given the opportunity to explore and explain their understandings. Where a student has specific wonderings, it is encouraged that parents support them in seeking answers to their questions and making sense of the environment and Science in their daily lives through talk and research, where possible.

Foundation/Reception Year Achievement Standard

By the end of the Foundation/Reception year, students describe the properties and behaviour of familiar objects. They suggest how the environment affects them and other living things.

Students share observations of familiar objects and events.

Year 1

Overview

Through the learning of Science, students are given the opportunities to develop an understanding of important Science concepts and processes, the practices used to develop scientific knowledge, Science’s contribution to our culture and society and Science’s applications in our lives. The Science Curriculum at Garden College aims to improve students’ inquiry skills, general knowledge of Science or ‘Scientific Literacy’ and their understanding of Science as a human endeavour by highlighting different approaches to a scientific view of the world.

Lesson Structure

Science lessons at Garden College are taught using an integrated inquiry model. The lessons aim to engage students with hands on experiences and activities that encourage them to ask questions and with support, discover ways of finding answers to their enquiries. Incursions and excursions that focus on assisting students to make sense of the Science in their lives and around them are organised and complement, as well as contribute to the teaching of Science at Garden College.

Scope and Sequences

Throughout Science at Garden College, students learn that observations can be organised to reveal patterns and that these patterns can be used to make predictions about phenomena. In year 1, students describe objects and events that they encounter in their everyday lives, and the effects of interacting with materials and objects. They identify a range of habitats. They describe changes to things in their local environments and suggest how science helps people care for environments with the following scope and sequence of topics:

Year 1 Science Scope and Sequence
Term 1 Term 2 Term 3 Term 4
What is a Family Living Things: Habitat and Survival Changing Shape and Size: How? Light and Sound Phenomenon’s

Assessment

Assessment includes:

  • Diagnostic assessment during the engage phase of the unit to gauge student understandings
  • Ongoing anecdotal notes/checklist of the skills attained
  • Projects with attached rubrics
  • Formal and informal summative topic tests

Resources

Primary Connections units are the primary resource referenced when planning for Science at Garden College. Incursions and excursions relevant to the topics being taught are also valuable and complement the understandings that are being developed.

Benchmarks and Recommendations

Garden College aims to engage students in Science topics and then set up learning experiences where students are given the opportunity to explore and explain their understandings. Where a student has specific wonderings, it is encouraged that parents support them in seeking answers to their questions and making sense of the environment and Science in their daily lives through talk and research, where possible.

Year 1 Achievement Standard

By the end of Year 1, students describe objects and events that they encounter in their everyday lives, and the effects of interacting with materials and objects. They identify a range of habitats. They describe changes to things in their local environment and suggest how science helps people care for environments.

Students make predictions, and investigate everyday phenomena. They follow instructions to record and sort their observations and share their observations with others.

Year 2

Overview

Through the learning of Science, students are given the opportunities to develop an understanding of important Science concepts and processes, the practices used to develop scientific knowledge, Science’s contribution to our culture and society and Science’s applications in our lives. The Science Curriculum at Garden College aims to improve students’ inquiry skills, general knowledge of Science or ‘Scientific Literacy’ and their understanding of Science as a human endeavour by highlighting different approaches to a scientific view of the world.

Lesson Structure

Science lessons at Garden College are taught using an integrated inquiry model. The lessons aim to engage students with hands on experiences and activities that encourage them to ask questions and with support, discover ways of finding answers to their enquiries. Incursions and excursions that focus on assisting students to make sense of the Science in their lives and around them are organised and complement, as well as contribute to the teaching of Science at Garden College.

Scope and Sequences

Throughout Science at Garden College, students learn that observations can be organised to reveal patterns and that these patterns can be used to make predictions about phenomena. In Year 2, students describe changes to objects, materials and living things. They identify that certain materials and resources have different uses and describe examples of where science is used in people’s daily lives.

Students pose questions about their experiences and predict outcomes of investigations. They use informal measurements to make and compare observations. They follow instructions to record and represent their observations and communicate their ideas to others with the following scope and sequence of topics:

Year 2 Science Scope and Sequence
Term 1 Term 2 Term 3 Term 4
Similarities and Difference Materials Around Us and Water Push and Pull Life Cycles

Assessment

Assessment includes:

  • Diagnostic assessment during the engage phase of the unit to gauge student understandings
  • Ongoing anecdotal notes/checklist of the skills attained
  • Projects with attached rubrics
  • Formal and informal summative topic tests

 

Resources

Primary Connections units are the primary resource referenced when planning for Science at Garden College. Incursions and excursions relevant to the topics being taught are also valuable and complement the understandings that are being developed.

Benchmarks and Recommendations

Garden College aims to engage students in Science topics and then set up learning experiences where students are given the opportunity to explore and explain their understandings. Where a student has specific wonderings, it is encouraged that parents support them in seeking answers to their questions and making sense of the environment and Science in their daily lives through talk and research, where possible.

Year 2 Achievement Standard

By the end of Year 2, students describe changes to objects, materials and living things. They identify that certain materials and resources have different uses and describe examples of where science is used in people’s daily lives.

Students pose questions about their experiences and predict outcomes of investigations. They use informal measurements to make and compare observations. They follow instructions to record and represent their observations and communicate their ideas to others.

Year 3

Overview

Through the learning of Science, students are given the opportunities to develop an understanding of important Science concepts and processes, the practices used to develop scientific knowledge, Science’s contribution to our culture and society and Science’s applications in our lives. The Science Curriculum at Garden College aims to improve students’ inquiry skills, general knowledge of Science or ‘Scientific Literacy’ and their understanding of Science as a human endeavour by highlighting different approaches to a scientific view of the world.

Lesson Structure

Science lessons at Garden College are taught using an integrated inquiry model. The lessons aim to engage students with hands on experiences and activities that encourage them to ask questions and with support, discover ways of finding answers to their enquiries. Incursions and excursions that focus on assisting students to make sense of the Science in their lives and around them are organised and complement, as well as contribute to the teaching of Science at Garden College.

Scope and Sequence

Throughout Science at Garden College, students learn that observations can be organised to reveal patterns and that these patterns can be used to make predictions about phenomena. In Year 3, students use their understanding of the movement of the Earth, materials and the behaviour of heat to suggest explanations for everyday observations and describe features common to living things. They describe how they can use science investigations to respond to questions and identify where people use science knowledge in their lives with the following scope and sequence of topics:

Year 3 Science Scope and Sequence
Term 1 Term 2 Term 3 Term 4
How can we help the planet? Solid, Liquid and Gas Day and Night Living and Non-Living Things

Assessment

Assessment includes:

  • Diagnostic assessment during the engage phase of the unit to gauge student understandings
  • Ongoing anecdotal notes/checklist of the skills attained
  • Projects with attached rubrics
  • Formal and informal summative topic tests

Resources

Primary Connections units are the primary resource referenced when planning for Science at Garden College. Incursions and excursions relevant to the topics being taught are also valuable and complement the understandings that are being developed.

Benchmarks and Recommendations

Garden College aims to engage students in Science topics and then set up learning experiences where students are given the opportunity to explore and explain their understandings. Where a student has specific wonderings, it is encouraged that parents support them in seeking answers to their questions and making sense of the environment and Science in their daily lives through talk and research, where possible.

Year 3 Achievement Standard

By the end of Year 3, students use their understanding of the movement of the Earth, materials and the behaviour of heat to suggest explanations for everyday observations. They describe features common to living things. They describe how they can use science investigations to respond to questions and identify where people use science knowledge in their lives.

Students use their experiences to pose questions and predict the outcomes of investigations. They make formal measurements and follow procedures to collect and present observations in a way that helps to answer the investigation questions. Students suggest possible reasons for their findings. They describe how safety and fairness were considered in their investigations. They use diagrams and other representations to communicate their ideas.

Year 4

Overview

Through the learning of Science, students are given the opportunities to develop an understanding of important Science concepts and processes, the practices used to develop scientific knowledge, Science’s contribution to our culture and society and Science’s applications in our lives. The Science Curriculum at Garden College aims to improve students’ inquiry skills, general knowledge of Science or ‘Scientific Literacy’ and their understanding of Science as a human endeavour by highlighting different approaches to a scientific view of the world.

Lesson Structure

Science lessons at Garden College are taught using an integrated inquiry model. The lessons aim to engage students with hands on experiences and activities that encourage them to ask questions and with support, discover ways of finding answers to their enquiries. Incursions and excursions that focus on assisting students to make sense of the Science in their lives and around them are organised and complement, as well as contribute to the teaching of Science at Garden College.

Scope and Sequence

Throughout Science at Garden College, students learn that observations can be organised to reveal patterns and that these patterns can be used to make predictions about phenomena. In Year 4, students develop their understanding of a range of systems operating at different time and geographic scales. They broaden their understanding of classification and form and function through an exploration of the properties of natural and processed materials. They learn that forces include non-contact forces and begin to appreciate that some interactions result from phenomena that can’t be seen with the naked eye. They begin to appreciate that current systems, such as Earth’s surface, have characteristics that have resulted from past changes and that living things form part of systems. They understand that some systems change in predictable ways, such as through cycles. They also apply their knowledge to make predictions whilst focusing on the following topics throughout the year:

Year 4 Science Scope and Sequence
Term 1 Term 2 Term 3 Term 4
Weather Food Chains Webs and Survival, Direct and Indirect Forces The Changing Earth

Assessment

Assessment includes:

  • Diagnostic assessment during the engage phase of the unit to gauge student understandings
  • Ongoing anecdotal notes/checklist of the skills attained
  • Projects with attached rubrics
  • Formal and informal summative topic tests

Resources

Primary Connections units are the primary resource referenced when planning for Science at Garden College. Incursions and excursions relevant to the topics being taught are also valuable and complement the understandings that are being developed.

Benchmarks and Recommendations

Garden College aims to engage students in Science topics and then set up learning experiences where students are given the opportunity to explore and explain their understandings. Where a student has specific wonderings, it is encouraged that parents support them in seeking answers to their questions and making sense of the environment and Science in their daily lives through talk and research, where possible.

Year 4 Achievement Standard

By the end of Year 4, students apply the observable properties of materials to explain how objects and materials can be used. They use contact and non-contact forces to describe interactions between objects. They discuss how natural and human processes cause changes to the Earth’s surface. They describe relationships that assist the survival of living things and sequence key stages in the life cycle of a plant or animal. They identify when science is used to ask questions and make predictions. They describe situations where science understanding can influence their own and others’ actions.

Students follow instructions to identify investigable questions about familiar contexts and predict likely outcomes from investigations. They discuss ways to conduct investigations and safely use equipment to make and record observations. They use provided tables and simple column graphs to organise their data and identify patterns in data. Students suggest explanations for observations and compare their findings with their predictions. They suggest reasons why their methods were fair or not. They complete simple reports to communicate their methods and findings.

Year 5

Overview

Through the learning of Science, students are given the opportunities to develop an understanding of important Science concepts and processes, the practices used to develop scientific knowledge, Science’s contribution to our culture and society and Science’s applications in our lives. The Science Curriculum at Garden College aims to improve students’ inquiry skills, general knowledge of Science or ‘Scientific Literacy’ and their understanding of Science as a human endeavour by highlighting different approaches to a scientific view of the world.

Lesson Structure

Science lessons at Garden College are taught using an integrated inquiry model. The lessons aim to engage students with hands on experiences and activities that encourage them to ask questions and with support, discover ways of finding answers to their enquiries. Incursions and excursions that focus on assisting students to make sense of the Science in their lives and around them, are organised and complement, as well as contribute to the teaching of Science at Garden College.

Scope and Sequence

Through Science at Garden College, students learn that observations can be organised to reveal patterns and that these patterns can be used to make predictions about phenomena. In grade 5, students develop their understanding of a range of systems operating at different time and geographic scales. They broaden their understanding of classification and form and function through an exploration of the properties of natural and processed materials. They learn that forces include non-contact forces and begin to appreciate that some interactions result from phenomena that can’t be seen with the naked eye. They begin to appreciate that current systems, such as Earth’s surface, have characteristics that have resulted from past changes and that living things form part of systems. They understand that some systems change in predictable ways, such as through cycles. They also apply their knowledge to make predictions whilst focusing on the following topics throughout the year:

Year 5 Science Scope and Sequence
Term 1 Term 2 Term 3 Term 4
Adaptation Light Works Earth’s Place in Space Exploring the Make Up of Matter

Assessment

Assessment includes:

  • Diagnostic assessment during the engage phase of the unit to gauge student understandings
  • Ongoing anecdotal notes/checklist of the skills attained
  • Projects with attached rubrics
  • Formal and informal summative topic tests

Resources

Primary Connections units are the primary resource referenced when planning for Science at Garden College. Incursions and excursions relevant to the topics being taught are also valuable and complement the understandings that are being developed.

Benchmarks and Recommendations

Garden College aims to engage students in Science topics and then set up learning experiences where students are given the opportunity to explore and explain their understandings. Where a student has specific wonderings, it is encouraged that parents support them in seeking answers to their questions and making sense of the environment and Science in their daily lives through talk and research, where possible.

Year 5 Achievement Standard

By the end of Year 5, students classify substances according to their observable properties and behaviours. They explaineveryday phenomena associated with the transfer of light. They describe the key features of our solar system. They analysehow the form of living things enables them to function in their environments. Students discuss how scientific developments have affected people’s lives and how science knowledge develops from many people’s contributions.

Students follow instructions to pose questions for investigation, predict what might happen when variables are changed, and plan investigation methods. They use equipment in ways that are safe and improve the accuracy of their observations. Students construct tables and graphs to organise data and identify patterns. They use patterns in their data to suggest explanations and refer to data when they report findings. They describe ways to improve the fairness of their methods and communicate their ideas, methods and findings using a range of text types.

Year 6

Overview

Through the learning of Science, students are given the opportunities to develop an understanding of important Science concepts and processes, the practices used to develop scientific knowledge, Science’s contribution to our culture and society and Science’s applications in our lives. The Science Curriculum at Garden College aims to improve students’ inquiry skills, general knowledge of Science or ‘Scientific Literacy’ and their understanding of Science as a human endeavor by highlighting different approaches to a scientific view of the world.

Lesson Structure

Science lessons at Garden College are taught using an integrated inquiry model. The lessons aim to engage students with hands on experiences and activities that encourage them to ask questions and with support, discover ways of finding answers to their enquiries. Incursions and excursions that focus on assisting students to make sense of the Science in their lives and around them are organised and complement, as well as contribute to the teaching of Science at Garden College.

Scope and Sequence

Throughout Science at Garden College, students learn that observations can be organised to reveal patterns and that these patterns can be used to make predictions about phenomena. In year 6, students develop their understanding of a range of systems operating at different time and geographic scales. They broaden their understanding of classification and form and function through an exploration of the properties of natural and processed materials. They learn that forces include non-contact forces and begin to appreciate that some interactions result from phenomena that can’t be seen with the naked eye. They begin to appreciate that current systems, such as Earth’s surface, have characteristics that have resulted from past changes and that living things form part of systems. They understand that some systems change in predictable ways, such as through cycles. They also apply their knowledge to make predictions whilst focusing on the following topics throughout the year:

Year 6 Science Scope and Sequence
Term 1 Term 2 Term 3 Term 4
Are you a discerning consumer? It’s Electrifying Natural Disasters and their Effects Extreme Environments and Survival

Assessment

Assessment includes:

  • Diagnostic assessment during the engage phase of the unit to gauge student understandings
  • Ongoing anecdotal notes/checklist of the skills attained
  • Projects with attached rubrics
  • Formal and informal summative topic tests

Resources

Primary Connections units are the primary resource referenced when planning for Science at Garden College. Incursions and excursions relevant to the topics being taught are also valuable and complement the understandings that are being developed.

Benchmarks and Recommendations

Garden College aims to engage students in Science topics and then set up learning experiences where students are given the opportunity to explore and explain their understandings. Where a student has specific wonderings, it is encouraged that parents support them in seeking answers to their questions and making sense of the environment and Science in their daily lives through talk and research, where possible.

Year 6 Achievement Standard

By the end of Year 6, students compare and classify different types of observable changes to materials. They analyserequirements for the transfer of electricity and describe how energy can be transformed from one form to another to generate electricity. They explain how natural events cause rapid change to the Earth’s surface. They describe and predict the effect of environmental changes on individual living things. Students explain how scientific knowledge is used in decision making and identify contributions to the development of science by people from a range of cultures.

Students follow procedures to develop investigable questions and design investigations into simple cause-and-effect relationships. They identify variables to be changed and measured and describe potential safety risks when planning methods. They collect, organise and interpret their data, identifying where improvements to their methods or research could improve the data. They describe and analyse relationships in data using graphic representations and construct multi-modal texts to communicate ideas, methods and findings.

Year-Reception (FOUNDATION)

Overview

History involves the learning and understanding of human experience through the use of various references and derived evidence. The History Curriculum addresses world history as a whole, incorporating within it, Australian history, in order to give students a well-rounded understanding of history on a local, regional and global level. Teaching Australia in the light of world history helps to increase student appreciation of Australian history and the development of Australia as a nation as well as provide them with a greater understanding of Australia’s indigenous peoples, their identity and cultures.

Lesson Structure

While History is a key learning area, it is not taught in isolation. Lessons to develop an understanding of History emphasises process as well as product, moving away from the acquisition of facts to the development of understandings about concepts and generalisations. These understandings are integrated into English and Mathematics as well as other learning areas. The focus is on developing students’ investigative and thinking skills and contribute to their ability to participate effectively in society. The lessons aim to engage students with hands on experiences and activities that encourage them to ask questions and with support, discover ways of finding answers to their enquiries. Lessons also contribute to enhancing self-esteem by encouraging students to take responsibility for their own learning as they acquire cooperative learning habits, whilst working in teams.

Scope and Sequence

History is organised into two interrelated strands: Historical Knowledge and Understanding and Historical Skills. The two strands are integrated in the development of term planners. The Historical Knowledge and Understanding strand provides the contexts through which particular skills are to be developed while the Historical Skills provide a common focus for the teaching and learning of the content. The following scope and sequence is followed when teaching History:

Reception History Scope and Sequence
Term 1 Term 2 Term 3 Term 4
Personal and Family Histories

Assessment

Assessment includes:

  • Diagnostic assessment during the engage phase of the History Inquiry unit to gauge understandings
  • Ongoing anecdotal notes/checklist of the skills attained
  • Projects with attached rubrics
  • Formal and informal summative topic tests

Resources

Graphic organizers are used to frame students’ wonderings and their ideas and the direction for further learning and inquiry into the topic is determined and personalized to suit each student and class.

Benchmarks and Recommendations

Due to History being an inquiry into the past, the collection of evidence to form understandings is very important. Parents’ verbal interactions with students and their assistance in recounting personal and family Histories is vital in developing these understandings.

Reception/Foundation Year Achievement Standard

By the end of the Reception/Foundation year, students identify similarities and differences between families. They recognisehow important family events are commemorated.

Students sequence familiar events in order. They pose questions about their past. Students relate a story about their past using a range of texts.

Year 1

Overview

History involves the learning and understanding of human experience through the use of various references and derived evidence. The History Curriculum addresses world history as a whole, incorporating within it, Australian history, in order to give students a well-rounded understanding of history on a local, regional and global level. Teaching Australia in the light of world history helps to increase student appreciation of Australian history and the development of Australia as a nation as well as provide them with a greater understanding of Australia’s indigenous peoples, their identity and cultures.

Lesson Structure

While History is a key learning area, it is not taught in isolation. Lessons to develop an understanding of History emphasises process as well as product, moving away from the acquisition of facts to the development of understandings about concepts and generalisations. These understandings are integrated into English and Mathematics as well as other learning areas. The focus is on developing students’ investigative and thinking skills and contribute to their ability to participate effectively in society. The lessons aim to engage students with hands on experiences and activities that encourage them to ask questions and with support, discover ways of finding answers to their enquiries. Lessons also contribute to enhancing self-esteem by encouraging students to take responsibility for their own learning as they acquire cooperative learning habits, whilst working in teams.

Scope and Sequence

History is organised into two interrelated strands: Historical Knowledge and Understanding and Historical Skills. The two strands are integrated in the development of term planners. The Historical Knowledge and Understanding strand provides the contexts through which particular skills are to be developed while the Historical Skills provide a common focus for the teaching and learning of the content. The following scope and sequence is followed when teaching History:

Teaching staff will add the topic content when designing their programs

History – Year 1 – Scope and Sequence
Term 1 Term 2 Term 3 Term 4
Present and Past Family Life

Assessment

Assessment includes:

  • Diagnostic assessment during the engage phase of the History Inquiry unit to gauge understandings
  • Ongoing anecdotal notes/checklist of the skills attained
  • Projects with attached rubrics
  • Formal and informal summative topic tests

Resources

Graphic organizers are used to frame students’ wonderings and their ideas and the direction for further learning and inquiry into the topic is determined and personalized to suit each student and class.

Benchmarks and Recommendations

Due to History being an inquiry into the past, the collection of evidence to form understandings is very important. Parents’ verbal interactions with students and their assistance in recounting personal and family Histories is vital in developing these understandings.

Year 1 Achievement Standard

By the end of Year 1, students explain how some aspects of daily life have changed over recent time while others have remained the same. They describe personal and family events that have significance.

Students sequence events in order, using everyday terms about the passing of time. They pose questions about the past and examine sources (physical and visual) to suggest answers to these questions. Students relate stories about life in the past, using a range of texts.

Year 2

Overview

History, involves the learning and understanding of human experience through the use of various references and derived evidence. The History Curriculum addresses world history as a whole, incorporating within it, Australian history, in order to give students a well-rounded understanding of history on a local, regional and global level. Teaching Australia in the light of world history helps to increase student appreciation of Australian history and the development of Australia as a nation as well as provide them with a greater understanding of Australia’s indigenous peoples, their identity and cultures.

Lesson Structure

While History is a key learning area, it is not taught in isolation. Lessons to develop an understanding of History emphasises process as well as product, moving away from the acquisition of facts to the development of understandings about concepts and generalisations. These understandings are integrated into English and Mathematics as well as other learning areas. The focus is on developing students’ investigative and thinking skills and contribute to their ability to participate effectively in society. The lessons aim to engage students with hands on experiences and activities that encourage them to ask questions and with support, discover ways of finding answers to their enquiries. Lessons also contribute to enhancing self-esteem by encouraging students to take responsibility for their own learning as they acquire cooperative learning habits, whilst working in teams.

Scope and Sequence

History is organised into two interrelated strands: Historical Knowledge and Understanding and Historical Skills. The two strands are integrated in the development of term planners. The Historical Knowledge and Understanding strand provides the contexts through which particular skills are to be developed while the Historical Skills provide a common focus for the teaching and learning of the content with the following History scope and sequence:

Teaching staff will add the topic content when designing their programs

History – Year 2 – Scope and Sequence
Term 1 Term 2 Term 3 Term 4
The Past in the Present

Assessment

Assessment includes:

  • Diagnostic assessment during the engage phase of the History Inquiry unit to gauge understandings
  • Ongoing anecdotal notes/checklist of the skills attained
  • Projects with attached rubrics
  • Formal and informal summative topic tests

Resources

Graphic organizers are used to frame students’ wonderings and their ideas and the direction for further learning and inquiry into the topic is determined and personalized to suit each student and class.

Benchmarks and Recommendations

Due to History being an inquiry into the past, the collection of evidence to form understandings is very important. Parents’ verbal interactions with students and their assistance in recounting personal and family Histories is vital in developing these understandings.

Year 2 Achievement Standard

By the end of Year 2, students analyse aspects of daily life to identify how some have changed over recent time while others have remained the same. They describe a person, site or event of significance in the local community.

Students sequence events in order, using a range of terms related to time. They pose questions about the past and use sources provided (physical, visual, oral) to answer these questions. They compare objects from the past and present. Students develop a narrative about the past using a range of texts.

Year 3

Overview

History, involves the learning and understanding of human experience through the use of various references and derived evidence. The History Curriculum addresses world history as a whole, incorporating within it, Australian history, in order to give students a well-rounded understanding of history on a local, regional and global level. Teaching Australia in the light of world history helps to increase student appreciation of Australian history and the development of Australia as a nation as well as provide them with a greater understanding of Australia’s indigenous peoples, their identity and cultures.

Lesson Structure

While History is a key learning area, it is not taught in isolation. Lessons to develop an understanding of History emphasises process as well as product, moving away from the acquisition of facts to the development of understandings about concepts and generalisations. These understandings are integrated into English and Mathematics as well as other learning areas. The focus is on developing students’ investigative and thinking skills and contribute to their ability to participate effectively in society. The lessons aim to engage students with hands on experiences and activities that encourage them to ask questions and with support, discover ways of finding answers to their enquiries. Lessons also contribute to enhancing self-esteem by encouraging students to take responsibility for their own learning as they acquire cooperative learning habits, whilst working in teams.

Scope and Sequence

History is organised into two interrelated strands: Historical Knowledge and Understanding and Historical Skills. The two strands are integrated in the development of term planners. The Historical Knowledge and Understanding strand provides the contexts through which particular skills are to be developed while the Historical Skills provide a common focus for the teaching and learning of the content. The following scope and sequence is followed when teaching History:

Teaching staff will add the topic content when designing their programs

History – Year 3 – Scope and Sequence
Term 1 Term 2 Term 3 Term 4
Community and Remembrance

Assessment

Assessment includes:

  • Diagnostic assessment during the engage phase of the History Inquiry unit to gauge understandings
  • Ongoing anecdotal notes/checklist of the skills attained
  • Projects with attached rubrics
  • Formal and informal summative topic tests

Resources

Graphic organizers are used to frame students’ wonderings and their ideas and the direction for further learning and inquiry into the topic is determined and personalized to suit each student and class.

Benchmarks and Recommendations

Due to History being an inquiry into the past, the collection of evidence to form understandings is very important. Parents’ verbal interactions with students and their assistance in recounting personal and family Histories is vital in developing these understandings.

Year 3 Achievement Standard

By the end of Year 3, students explain how communities changed in the past. They describe the experiences of an individual or group. They identify events and aspects of the past that have significance in the present.

Students sequence events and people (their lifetime) in chronological order, with reference to key dates. They pose questions about the past and locate information from sources (written, physical, visual, oral) to answer these questions. Students develop texts, including narratives, using terms denoting time.

Year 4

Overview

History, involves the learning and understanding of human experience through the use of various references and derived evidence. The History Curriculum addresses world history as a whole, incorporating within it, Australian history, in order to give students a well-rounded understanding of history on a local, regional and global level. Teaching Australia in the light of world history helps to increase student appreciation of Australian history and the development of Australia as a nation as well as provide them with a greater understanding of Australia’s indigenous peoples, their identity and cultures.

Lesson Structure

While History is a key learning area, it is not taught in isolation. Lessons to develop an understanding of History emphasises process as well as product, moving away from the acquisition of facts to the development of understandings about concepts and generalisations. These understandings are integrated into English and Mathematics as well as other learning areas. The focus is on developing students’ investigative and thinking skills and contribute to their ability to participate effectively in society. The lessons aim to engage students with hands on experiences and activities that encourage them to ask questions and with support, discover ways of finding answers to their enquiries. Lessons also contribute to enhancing self-esteem by encouraging students to take responsibility for their own learning as they acquire cooperative learning habits, whilst working in teams.

Scope and Sequence

History is organised into two interrelated strands: Historical Knowledge and Understanding and Historical Skills. The two strands are integrated in the development of term planners. The Historical Knowledge and Understanding strand provides the contexts through which particular skills are to be developed while the Historical Skills provide a common focus for the teaching and learning of the content. The following scope and sequence is followed when teaching History:

Teaching staff will add the topic content when designing their programs

History – Year 4 – Scope and Sequence
Term 1 Term 2 Term 3 Term 4
First Contacts

Assessment

Assessment includes:

  • Diagnostic assessment during the engage phase of the History Inquiry unit to gauge understandings
  • Ongoing anecdotal notes/checklist of the skills attained
  • Projects with attached rubrics
  • Formal and informal summative topic tests

Resources

Graphic organizers are used to frame students’ wonderings and their ideas and the direction for further learning and inquiry into the topic is determined and personalized to suit each student and class.

Benchmarks and Recommendations

Due to History being an inquiry into the past, the collection of evidence to form understandings is very important. Parents’ verbal interactions with students and their assistance in recounting personal and family Histories is vital in developing these understandings.

Year 4 Achievement Standard

By the end of Year 4, students explain how and why life changed in the past, and identify aspects of the past that remained the same. They describe the experiences of an individual or group over time. They recognise the significance of events in bringing about change.

Students sequence events and people (their lifetime) in chronological order to identify key dates. They pose a range of questions about the past. They identify sources (written, physical, visual, oral), and locate information to answer these questions. They recognise different points of view. Students develop and present texts, including narratives, using historical terms.

Year 5

Overview

History, involves the learning and understanding of human experience through the use of various references and derived evidence. The History Curriculum addresses world history as a whole, incorporating within it, Australian history, in order to give students a well-rounded understanding of history on a local, regional and global level. Teaching Australia in the light of world history helps to increase student appreciation of Australian history and the development of Australia as a nation as well as provide them with a greater understanding of Australia’s indigenous peoples, their identity and cultures.

Lesson Structure

While History is a key learning area, it is not taught in isolation. Lessons to develop an understanding of History emphasises process as well as product, moving away from the acquisition of facts to the development of understandings about concepts and generalisations. These understandings are integrated into English and Mathematics as well as other learning areas. The focus is on developing students’ investigative and thinking skills and contribute to their ability to participate effectively in society. The lessons aim to engage students with hands on experiences and activities that encourage them to ask questions and with support, discover ways of finding answers to their enquiries. Lessons also contribute to enhancing self-esteem by encouraging students to take responsibility for their own learning as they acquire cooperative learning habits, whilst working in teams.

Scope and Sequence

History is organised into two interrelated strands: Historical Knowledge and Understanding and Historical Skills. The two strands are integrated in the development of term planners. The Historical Knowledge and Understanding strand provides the contexts through which particular skills are to be developed while the Historical Skills provide a common focus for the teaching and learning of the content. The following scope and sequence is followed when teaching History:

Teaching staff will add the topic content when designing their programs

History – Year 5 – Scope and Sequence
Term 1 Term 2 Term 3 Term 4
The Australian Colonies

Assessment

Assessment includes:

  • Diagnostic assessment during the engage phase of the History Inquiry unit to gauge understandings
  • Ongoing anecdotal notes/checklist of the skills attained
  • Projects with attached rubrics
  • Formal and informal summative topic tests

Resources

Graphic organizers are used to frame students’ wonderings and their ideas and the direction for further learning and inquiry into the topic is determined and personalized to suit each student and class.

Benchmarks and Recommendations

Due to History being an inquiry into the past, the collection of evidence to form understandings is very important. Parents’ verbal interactions with students and their assistance in recounting personal and family Histories is vital in developing these understandings.

Year 5 Achievement Standard

By the end of Year 5, students identify the causes and effects of change on particular communities, and describe aspects of the past that remained the same. They describe the different experiences of people in the past. They describe the significance of people and events in bringing about change.

Students sequence events and people (their lifetime) in chronological order, using timelines. When researching, students develop questions to frame an historical inquiry. They identify a range of sources and locate and record information related to this inquiry. They examine sources to identify points of view. Students develop, organise and present their texts, particularly narratives and descriptions, using historical terms and concepts.

Year 6

Overview

History, involves the learning and understanding of human experience through the use of various references and derived evidence. The History Curriculum addresses world history as a whole, incorporating within it, Australian history, in order to give students a well-rounded understanding of history on a local, regional and global level. Teaching Australia in the light of world history helps to increase student appreciation of Australian history and the development of Australia as a nation as well as provide them with a greater understanding of Australia’s indigenous peoples, their identity and cultures.

Lesson Structure

While History is a key learning area, it is not taught in isolation. Lessons to develop an understanding of History emphasises process as well as product, moving away from the acquisition of facts to the development of understandings about concepts and generalisations. These understandings are integrated into English and Mathematics as well as other learning areas. The focus is on developing students’ investigative and thinking skills and contribute to their ability to participate effectively in society. The lessons aim to engage students with hands on experiences and activities that encourage them to ask questions and with support, discover ways of finding answers to their enquiries. Lessons also contribute to enhancing self-esteem by encouraging students to take responsibility for their own learning as they acquire cooperative learning habits, whilst working in teams.

Scope and Sequence

History is organised into two interrelated strands: Historical Knowledge and Understanding and Historical Skills. The two strands are integrated in the development of term planners. The Historical Knowledge and Understanding strand provides the contexts through which particular skills are to be developed while the Historical Skills provide a common focus for the teaching and learning of the content. The following scope and sequence is followed when teaching History:

Teaching staff will add the topic content when designing their programs

History – Year 6 – Scope and Sequence
Term 1 Term 2 Term 3 Term 4
Australia as a Nation

Assessment

Assessment includes:

  • Diagnostic assessment during the engage phase of the History Inquiry unit to gauge understandings
  • Ongoing anecdotal notes/checklist of the skills attained
  • Projects with attached rubrics
  • Formal and informal summative topic tests

Resources

Graphic organizers are used to frame students’ wonderings and their ideas and the direction for further learning and inquiry into the topic is determined and personalized to suit each student and class.

Benchmarks and Recommendations

Due to History being an inquiry into the past, the collection of evidence to form understandings is very important. Parents’ verbal interactions with students and their assistance in recounting personal and family Histories is vital in developing these understandings.

Year 6 Achievement Standard

By the end of Year 6, students identify change and continuity and describe the causes and effects of change on society. They compare the different experiences of people in the past. They explain the significance of an individual and group.

Students sequence events and people (their lifetime) in chronological order, and represent time by creating timelines. When researching, students develop questions to frame an historical inquiry. They identify a range of sources and locate and compare information to answer inquiry questions. They examine sources to identify and describe points of view. Students develop texts, particularly narratives and descriptions. In developing these texts and organising and presenting their information, they use historical terms and concepts and incorporate relevant sources.

Geography

Rationale

Geography is a structured way of exploring, analysing and understanding the characteristics of the places that make up our world, using the concepts of place, space, environment, interconnection, sustainability, scale and change. It addresses scales from the personal to the global and time periods from a few years to thousands of years.

Geography integrates knowledge from the natural sciences, social sciences and humanities to build a holistic understanding of the world. Students learn to question why the world is the way it is, reflect on their relationships with and responsibilities for that world, and propose actions designed to shape a socially just and sustainable future.

The concept of place develops students’ curiosity and wonder about the diversity of the world’s places, peoples, cultures and environments. Students use the concept of space to investigate the effects of location and distance on the characteristics of places, the significance of spatial distributions, and the organisation and management of space at different scales.

Students use the concept of interconnection to understand how the causal relationships between places, people and environments produce constant changes to their characteristics.

Through the concept of sustainability students explore how the environmental functions that support their life and wellbeing can be sustained.

Geography uses an inquiry approach to assist students to make meaning of their world. At Garden College Geography is part of the integrated studies curriculum.

The Australian Curriculum’ Geography curriculum is structured in two strands:

  • Geographical Knowledge and Understanding – which includes a study of environmental and human aspects of geography at local, national, regional and global scales. This strand involves the investigation of the facts, generalisations, principles, theories and models developed in geography. The geography curriculum recognises that this knowledge is dynamic and its interpretation can be contested, that people can come to different conclusions about the same questions, and that opinions and conclusions must be supported by evidence and logical argument. This strand involves students developing the ability to see the relationships between geographical concepts (place, space, environment, interconnection, sustainability, scale and change), to construct explanatory frameworks to illustrate relationships, and to synthesise them into an integrated whole. It is also about applying this geographical knowledge to new situations or to solve problems by thinking and planning for action.
  • Geography Inquiry and Skills: This strand promotes a process of inquiry by which students learn new geographical knowledge and deepen their understanding. This is developed through investigations that involve observations or questions (for example, about environmental, social, cultural and economic features) the collection and interpretation of information to develop conclusions; and reflection on the overall process. Inquiries may be undertaken by individual students, or collaboratively, and may vary in scale, geographic context, and the time taken for the investigation. There is an emphasis on the techniques that geographers use in the field and in the classroom. Students learn to think critically about the methods used to obtain information and to analyse and interpret the information in order to communicate their findings.

Key skills which are progressively developed include (but are not limited to) formulating a question and research action plan that is of a specific geographical nature, developing observation recording skills including diagrams such as field sketches, interpreting and developing maps, tables, photographs, satellite images, diagrams, graphs and other data, using a variety of spatial technologies and communicating with appropriate and relevant geographical vocabulary.

The knowledge, skills and dispositions students need to succeed in life and work in the twenty-first century have been identified in the Australian Curriculum as general capabilities. There are seven general capabilities which will be integrated within lesson planning so that Geography is contextual:

  • Literacy
  • Numeracy
  • Competence in information and communication technology (ICT)
  • Critical and creative thinking
  • Ethical behavior
  • Ethical behavior
  • Personal and social competence
  • Intercultural understanding

Scope and sequence Reception to Year 6

Reception to 6 Geography Scope and Sequence
Reception Year 1 Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 Year 5 Year 6
We discover the local community – My Home We discover the local community – My Local Community We discover the local community – My Land Australia Australia is a unique place with much to be proud of We live in an environment where the changing environment affects us Climate and Activities – We live in a world where the changing environment affects us Going Global – Environments are changing and we need to take responsibility for their sustainability

RECEPTION/FOUNDATION TO YEAR 2

Overview

Curriculum Focus – Exploring local and more distant places

In Reception/Foundation to Year 2 the curriculum focuses on exploring the geography of their lives and their own place, to get students thinking about aspects of place, space and environment. They observe, describe and classify the features of their place, using models, maps, sounds, stories and drawings. Learning about their own place, and building a connection with it, also contributes to their sense of identity and belonging. While the local place should be the initial focus for learning, young students are also aware of and interested in more distant places and the curriculum provides opportunities to build on this curiosity. Students find out about the ways they are connected to places throughout the world through family and cultural groups in their community, the origin of familiar products, travel and world events.

Students’ spatial thinking starts by learning about direction and distance, and about the ways that familiar things can be arranged in space for different purposes. They become aware of the distances between places and how distance constrains their activities. Students are introduced to the concept of environment through the exploration of the natural and built environment of their own and other places, by finding out about the environmental resources they use and where these come from, and by recognising that weather varies from place to place. They become aware of why the environment needs to be cared for.

Specific geographical skills which are introduced throughout the early years include creating, interpreting and using a map, using directional language, understanding scale and distance, and recording data related to weather.

Lesson Structures

The equivalent of one Term will be dedicated to the study of Geography. In the early years it will be part of the integrated curriculum using play, inquiry and higher order thinking to discover their world. Models, maps and dioramas will be developed so display deep knowledge and understandings. Students will use geography language to describe their constructions, diagrams, maps and written work.

Geography emphasises inquiry-based learning and teaching, and opportunities for student-led questioning and investigation will be provided at all stages of schooling. The curriculum will provide opportunities for fieldwork and excursions, as this is an essential component of geographical learning. Fieldwork is any study undertaken outside the classroom, and could be within the school grounds, around the neighbouring streets, or in more distant locations.

Scope and Sequence

  Reception to Year 2 – Geography Scope and Sequence
  Term 1 Term 2 Term 3 Term 4
Rec Where we Live – My home
Year 1 Not everywhere is the same – My local Community
Year 2 Links to our world – My land Australia

Reception/Foundation Year

Big idea: Where we live

The Foundation curriculum builds student’s understanding of places. Students explore the place in which they live and places that they know. They observe natural features and built features of these places and consider places that are special to them. Space is introduced when students observe how places and objects are arranged, and experiment with different ways of arranging familiar spaces, like the classroom. The study of weather in science is extended through discussion of how the daily weather influences the location of activities. Students are encouraged to ask questions about the world that they can answer through collective inquiry involving observation and play. They will be introduced to the stages of inquiry by reflecting on how their thinking has changed.

Year 1

Big Idea: Not everywhere is the same

The Year 1 curriculum expands the understanding of familiar places explored in Foundation. Students are guided to see familiar places as part of bigger places and they begin identifying how places change. Spatial understanding is expanded from exploring the arrangement of space in Foundation to recognising ways that places are used. Students learn more about the environmental features of places, and begin to consider ways of caring for the environment. The inquiry process is guided and students are introduced to geographical tools that help them develop their skills and answer their questions.

Year 2

Big Idea: Links to our world

The Year 2 curriculum builds on student learning about places in earlier years by exploring people’s connections with other places. Students then expand their geographical knowledge by finding out about these other places and using an increasing variety of information sources. Their spatial understanding is extended from reviewing the use of spaces to examining how distance influences the places they go to. Year 2 learning about environment builds on the Foundation study of weather and students learn about the weather in different places. Students apply their previous learning about environment as they recognise the environment as the source for things they use and consider how significant places are protected. The inquiry process continues to be guided and students are introduced to geographical tools and skills that help them answer their questions.

Assessment

The teaching and learning methods outlined under ‘lesson structure’ will be supported by forms of assessment that enable students to demonstrate their ability to think geographically and apply geographical skills. This will include:

  • The construction of models, diagrams, maps, graphs
  • Written work
  • Oral presentations
  • Peer assessment

Resources

No particular resources have been purchased. When staff are selected they will ascertain appropriate resources both in hard and electronic copies. The Australian Curriculum Geography Content Descriptors and Elaborations will provide staff with information when programming.

Australian Curriculum Achievement Standards

By the end of the Reception/Foundation Year, students describe the key characteristics of some familiar places. They explain how particular places are special to them and how they can be cared for. They locate and represent places and features on simple maps. They can talk about how weather has an effect on life in a place. Students can represent and describe the layout of familiar places.

Students pose and answer questions about their world by observing familiar places. They sort their observations and represent them using a given format. Students talk about how their thinking has changed.

By the end of Year 1, students explain how some places are different in their use, and change over time. They describe the different environmental features of places and explain how people can have an effect upon places and the environments within them.

Students pose and respond to questions in a guided inquiry using information sources provided. They use data and images to draw conclusions about places. They present their findings using a variety of geographical texts (oral, visual, written).

 

By the end of Year 2, students explain that they are connected to other places and that distance influences people’s use of a place. They recognise that the environment is the source of everything they use, suggest consequences of consumption and examine how the significance of an environment contributes to its use.

Students pose and respond to several questions using fieldwork and information sources provided. They collect and sort their information to identify patterns and draw conclusions. When communicating their findings, students use geographical tools and geographical vocabulary. They talk about how their learning has changed.

Years 3 and 4

Overview

Curriculum focus: Investigating places

In Years 3 & 4 students are able to ask more complex geographical questions, and to contribute to planning their geographical inquiries and learning. They can provide reasons for what they think, and justify their conclusions. The curriculum focus shifts from exploration to more purposeful investigation.

Students learn ways to describe and compare places, about different cultures, and to investigate how people perceive and think about places. They are aware of a larger number of places, and may have travelled to some of them. Their spatial knowledge is developed through studies of the major divisions of the earth’s surface, of the location and main characteristics of the States, Territories and major cities of Australia, and of ways of explaining a spatial distribution. This is in conjunction with the history curriculum.

They investigate several aspects of Aboriginal Peoples’ and Torres Strait Islander Peoples’ life before European colonial presence. Their environmental understanding is developed through studies of landforms, weather and their personal environmental impact. In their investigations, students collaborate to collect and record evidence, analyse, draw conclusions and communicate their findings, using appropriate geographical vocabulary.

Specific geographical skills in Years 3-4 build on those skills which are included in the early years and also include the introduction of the use of spatial technologies, map projections and the use of scale.

Lesson Structure

The equivalent of one Term will be dedicated to the study of Geography. In Years 3 and 4 Geography will use inquiry and higher order thinking to discover the student’s world. Models, maps and dioramas will be developed so display deep knowledge and understandings. Students will use geography language to describe their constructions, diagrams, maps and written work.

Geography emphasises inquiry-based learning and teaching, and opportunities for student-led questioning and investigation should be provided at all stages of schooling. The curriculum should also provide opportunities for fieldwork at all stages, as this is an essential component of geographical learning. Fieldwork is any study undertaken outside the classroom, and could be within the school grounds, around the neighbouring streets, or in more distant locations. These teaching and learning methods should be supported by forms of assessment that enable students to demonstrate their ability to think geographically and apply geographical skills.

Scope and Sequence

  Years 3 and 4 – Geography Scope and Sequence
  Term 1 Term 2 Term 3 Term 4
Year 3 How we Live – Australia is a unique place with much to be proud of
Year 4 How we Live – We live in an environment where the changing environment affects us

Year 3

Big Idea: How we live

The Year 3 curriculum for geography builds on previous learning about places as students are guided to describe and compare places in a geographic way. Students build on their learning about links between people and places as they examine the personal and cultural connections people have to places. In space, students apply abstract thinking to their earlier learning about layout and distances as they build understanding of how maps represent places. Students are also introduced to the ways natural resources are distributed across Australia and the world. This builds on Year 2 learning about the environment as the source of all they use and links to environment, where the concept of sustainability is formally introduced. Students then consider their own resource use and how they can reduce their impact. The inquiry strand builds on Years 1 and 2 as students are asked to identify whether questions are geographical and they consider the primary sources and secondary sources they can use to find answers.

 

Year 4

Big Idea: How we live

The Year 4 curriculum for geography builds on Year 3 exploration of connection to places by providing opportunities for students to consider the culture of places. Students link their learning to history by exploring the geography and spatial arrangement of Australia before European colonial presence. This also introduces them to exploring the geographic features of Australia and how they are distributed. To build on their earlier learning about distant places, investigation of places and environments moves to the global scale. Environment is further developed through studies of landforms and the influence of air masses on local weather. Students are asked to identify whether questions are geographical and consider the primary sources and secondary sources they can use to find answers. Students also explore cause and effect relationships by suggesting consequences for actions.

Assessment

The teaching and learning methods outlined under ‘lesson structure’ will be supported by forms of assessment that enable students to demonstrate their ability to think geographically and apply geographical skills. This will include:

  • The construction of models, diagrams, maps, graphs
  • Written work
  • Oral presentation
  • Peer assessment

Resources

No particular resources have been purchased. When staff are selected they will ascertain appropriate resources both in hard and electronic copies. The Australian Curriculum Geography Content Descriptors and Elaborations will provide staff with information when programming.

Australian Curriculum Achievement Standards

By the end of Year 3, students describe and compare the geographical features of places and recognise that people have different connections to places. They recognise that maps are used as geographical tools to represent places and relationships between places. They explain the location, uses and management of some natural resources in relation to sustainability.

Students select appropriate questions for a geographical inquiry. They suggest information sources and collect data in response to questions. They draw conclusions from their investigation. When communicating their conclusions, they use geographical tools and geographical vocabulary.

By the end of Year 4, students explain how the environment shapes the ways in which people live. They investigate and describe cultures or different ways of life around the world. They analyse personal and cultural perceptions of places and how these are described. Students describe the diversity of Australian environments and consider how natural processes have shaped the environment over time.

Students pose geographical questions and speculate about their answers. They identify geographical sources to gather information or data and consider the usefulness of these sources. They evaluate data to suggest relationships or patterns. Students draw conclusions from their inquiry and suggest responses. When communicating their conclusions, they use appropriate geographical tools and geographical vocabulary, using geographical conventions to show and describe what they have learned from an inquiry.

Years 5 and 6

Overview

Curriculum Focus: Analysing and Managing Places

In Years 5–6, students become more complex, critical, analytical and evaluative in their thinking. They are increasingly aware of their wider community, and are learning to take on individual and group responsibilities. The curriculum focus is on analysing and managing places, and students should be involved in at least one investigation of a local environmental, social or planning issue and how it is managed.

Their study of places near and far continues to expand, to those well beyond their immediate experience. They learn that places can be described and classified by their functions, gain a more complex view of how places are connected, and explore how to explain their characteristics. In Year 6 the study of scale shifts to the global, with an initial investigation of the distribution of the world’s population, wealth and health. In their studies of the environment, students build their knowledge of weather into the concept of climate and its influence, and are introduced to the concept of environmental sustainability. Climate and weather are also considered in a study of bushfires and their management.

Specific geographical skills in Years 5-6 continue to build upon the skills introduced in the early years and throughout Years 3-4. They also include interpreting spatial distribution, and developing and interpreting graphs and charts related to climate and weather.

Lesson Structure

The equivalent of one Term will be dedicated to the study of Geography. In Year 5 and 6 the study of Geography will use inquiry and higher order thinking to discover their world. Models, maps and dioramas will be developed so display deep knowledge and understandings. Students will use geography language to describe their constructions, diagrams, maps and written work.

Geography emphasises inquiry-based learning and teaching, and opportunities for student-led questioning and investigation should be provided at all stages of schooling. The curriculum should also provide opportunities for fieldwork at all stages, as this is an essential component of geographical learning. Fieldwork is any study undertaken outside the classroom, and could be within the school grounds, around the neighbouring streets, or in more distant locations. These teaching and learning methods should be supported by forms of assessment that enable students to demonstrate their ability to think geographically and apply geographical skills.

Scope and Sequence

  Year 5 and 6 – Geography Scope and Sequence
  Term 1 Term 2 Term 3 Term 4
Year 5 Climate and Activities – We live in a world where the changing environment affects us
Year 6 Going Global –Environments are changing and we need to take responsibility for their sustainability

Year 5

Big Idea: Climate and activities

The Year 5 curriculum for geography has a focus on building students’ ability to explain their world in a geographic way. It requires increased critical and analytical thinking. Students consider contemporary places and the functions they serve. This builds on their spatial knowledge of Australia in Year 4, by analysing the spatial distribution of human populations and activities, such as retailing and tourism at national and regional levels. The environmental theme is extended from earlier studies of weather into the idea of climate. Students discuss contemporary sustainability issues. The Inquiry and Skills strand builds on students’ analytical, decision-making and evaluation skills. They draw conclusions on issues and consider different viewpoints when thinking about what could or should happen in the future. Students reflect on the effectiveness of their inquiry, how their thinking is different to that of others and how it has changed as a result of their learning.

 

Year 6

Big Idea: Going Global

In the Year 6 curriculum for geography, students are immersed in considering place, space and environment through a global lens. Students begin to explore the connections between places and the impacts of these connections. Study of space also becomes global increasing students’ knowledge of places throughout the world and introduces them to some of the fundamental inequalities and differences across the world. The Inquiry and Skills strand builds students’ analytical, decision-making and evaluation skills. They draw conclusions on issues and consider different viewpoints when thinking about what could or should happen in the future. Students reflect on the effectiveness of their inquiry and how their thinking is different to that of others and has changed as a result of their learning.

Assessment

The teaching and learning methods outlined under ‘lesson structure’ will be supported by forms of assessment that enable students to demonstrate their ability to think geographically and apply geographical skills. This will include:

  • The construction of models, diagrams, maps, graphs
  • Written work
  • Oral presentation
  • Peer assessment

Resources

No particular resources have been purchased. When staff are selected they will ascertain appropriate resources both in hard and electronic copies. The Australian Curriculum Geography Content Descriptors and Elaborations will provide staff with information when programming.

Australian Curriculum Achievement Standards

By the end of Year 5, students analyse the different uses and functions of land in different places and at different scales. They reflect on sustainability to describe the features of a variety of places and explain how communities provide services and manage places. They describe patterns in human activities and explain how they have changed over time. They describe the relationships between climate and environments and human activity. Students evaluate the sustainability of a range of human activities and generate and justify a plan for action.

Students select geographical questions that range in complexity to guide an inquiry. They identify and use a variety of geographical information sources to gather information or data and judge the validity of these sources. When investigating, they identify and use appropriate materials, geographical tools and skills and equipment and manage the data they collect to identify patterns and relationships. They combine their data and information to draw conclusions.

When communicating their conclusions to a range of audiences, they select and use appropriate geographical tools and geographical vocabulary.

Reception to Year 2

Overview

H & PE at Garden College attempts to provide students with knowledge, understanding and skills to allow them to enhance their own and others’ health and wellbeing in varied and changing contexts. Integral to H & PE is the acquisition of movement skills, concepts and strategies that enable students to confidently and competently participate in a range of physical activities.

 

The curriculum in Reception/Foundation to Year 2 focuses on developing the knowledge, understanding, and skills that support students to be healthy, safe, and active individuals who can move competently and confidently in a range of physical spaces and on diverse surfaces.

The health contexts explored in the Reception/Foundation to Year 2 curriculum include, but are not limited to:

  • Safe use of medicines
  • Food and nutrition
  • Health benefits of physical activity

The movement and physical activity contexts that students will experience in the Reception/Foundation to Year 2 curriculum include, but are not limited to :

  • Active play and minor games
  • Fundamental movement skills
  • Rhythmic and expressive movement.

Lesson Structure

H & PE lessons are conducted in both indoor and outdoor settings with an emphasis on teamwork and control over body movements. Students are taught specific movements as a powerful medium for a range of personal, interpersonal, behavioural, social and cognitive skills. Students gain expertise in movement skills, physical activities and physical fitness through a range of games and activities.

Scope and Sequence

A Perceptual Motor Skills Program is to be implemented during Reception PE lessons and aims to develop students’ motor skills that are foundational skills for many activities in the classroom. The PMP aims to allow students to practice these skills in a fun, holistic and organized way through movement awareness, bean bag and rope play, ball handling activities, basic athletics and basic gymnastics throughout the year.

 

Staff when appointed will select the topics for study for each term.

Reception to Year 2 – Health & Physical Education Scope and Sequence
  Term 1 Term 2 Term 3 Term 4
Health Contexts
Movement and Physical Activity

 

Assessment

Assessment includes:

  • Checklists
  • Anecdotal notes

Resources

A range of equipment including soft and hard balls, skipping ropes, hoops, bean bags, bats, athletic equipment are used regularly during H & PE lessons, depending on the nature and focus of each lesson.

Benchmarks and Recommendations

Due to Occupational Health and Safety (OH & S) requirements, students are required to wear sports shoes and the appropriate uniform during H & PE lessons. It is also recommended that students have their water bottles with them during H & PE lessons, especially during terms 1 and 4. Garden College’s has a Sun Smart Policy, students are required to wear their hats or visors during outdoor H & PE lessons.

Reception/Foundation achievement standard

By the end of Reception/Foundation Year, students recognise how their body is growing and changing. They also recognise the important people in their lives who help them be healthy, safe, and physically active every day. They identify how to move and play safely, and are able to describe how their body responds to movement. 
Students demonstrate how to express different emotions, and the personal and social skills to include others in a range of activities. With guidance, they demonstrate healthy and safe practices in classroom and movement situations, and are able to demonstrate help-seeking strategies. They perform a range of fundamental movement skills with increasing confidence and competence in physical play, modified games, and rhythmic and expressive activities.

Years 1 and 2 Achievement Standard

By the end of Year 2, students identify their personal strengths and achievements, and describe the different changes that occur as they grow older. They explore the differences and diversity of individuals and groups, and are able to ask for help if they need it. They describe how the body reacts to physical activity and explain how healthy eating and being active keeps them well. 
Students demonstrate positive ways to interact with others, and select and apply strategies to keep them healthy and safe. They demonstrate a broad range of fundamental movement skills including sequencing and using equipment in play, games and in response to a variety of stimuli.

Years 3 – 6

Overview

H & PE at Garden College attempts to provide students with knowledge, understanding and skills to allow them to enhance their own and others’ health and wellbeing in varied and changing contexts. Integral to H & PE is the acquisition of movement skills, concepts and strategies that enable students to confidently and competently participate in a range of physical activities.

As students move through primary school, the focus broadens also to include the knowledge, understanding, and skills necessary to support and enhance their own health and wellbeing and that of their family and friends. Students are increasingly connected to their world and their peers. Personal and social skills take on an increasing importance, and students become more aware of gender expectations and stereotypes. They look to family, peers, the media, the Internet, and the community for role models. Students in Years 3–6 further develop and refine their fundamental movement skills, learn about the common features of games and expand their understanding of movement strategies and different tactical solutions to increase their sense of success in physical activities.

The Health and Physical Education curriculum in Year 3 to Year 6 provides explicit learning opportunities to develop the communication skills, social skills and behaviours needed to work effectively with others in a range of environments and contexts. The health contexts explored in Years 3 to 6 include, but are not limited to:

  • alcohol and drugs
  • Food and nutrition
  • Health benefits of physical activity
  • Mental health and wellbeing
  • Relationships and sexuality (from Year 5)

The curriculum allows students to experience a range of movement activities, to develop further movement competence and confidence. It also supports and encourages lifelong physical activity participation. The movement and physical activity contexts that students will experience in Years 3 to 6 include, but are not limited to:

  • Active play and minor games
  • Challenge and adventure activities
  • Fundamental movement skills
  • Games and sports
  • Health-related physical activities
  • Rhythmic and expressive movement activities.

Lesson Structure

H & PE lessons are conducted in both indoor and outdoor settings with an emphasis on teamwork and control over body movements. Students are taught specific movements as a powerful medium for a range of personal, interpersonal, behavioural, social and cognitive skills. Students gain expertise in movement skills, physical activities and physical fitness through a range of games and activities.

Scope and Sequence

In Years 3 to 6, students perform a broad range of complex motor skills. They demonstrate a wide variety of motor skills and apply them to basic, sport-specific situations. They create and perform coordinated movement sequences that contain a variety of motor skills and movement patterns. They participate regularly in physical activities for the purpose of improving skill and health, and identify and describe the components of health-related fitness as well as healthy eating choices that contribute to well being.

 

Staff when appointed will select the topics for study for each term.

Year 3 to Year 4 – Health & Physical Education Scope and Sequence
  Term 1 Term 2 Term 3 Term 4
Health Contexts
Movement and Physical Activity

Assessment

Assessment includes:

  • Checklists
  • Anecdotal notes

Resources

A range of equipment including soft and hard balls, skipping ropes, hoops, bean bags, bats, athletic equipment are used regularly during H & PE lessons, depending on the nature and focus of each lesson.

Benchmarks and Recommendations

Due to Occupational Health and Safety (OH & S) requirements, students are required to wear sports shoes and the appropriate uniform during H & PE lessons. It is also recommended that students have their water bottles with them during H & PE lessons, especially during terms 1 and 4. Garden College’s has a Sun Smart Policy and students are required to wear their hats or visors during outdoor H & PE lessons.

Years 3 and 4 Achievement Standard

By the end of Year 4, students describe the connections they have to their community and identify resources available locally to support their health, physical activity, and wellbeing. They examine factors that shape identity and beliefs, and are able to discuss the influences on healthy and safe choices. They understand the benefits of physical activity and are able to apply rules fairly in a range of situations. 
Students demonstrate decision-making and problem-solving skills when finding solutions to health and movement challenges. They suggest and apply a range of strategies for working cooperatively with others to achieve a goal, and for staying safe and healthy in a range of situations. They create and perform movement sequences using a variety of movement skills and patterns.

Years 5 and 6 Achievement Standard

By the end of Year 6, students investigate the perspectives of others and discuss how a range of factors influences how people co-exist. They describe their own and others’ contributions to health, physical activity and wellbeing and identify a range of appropriate ways to respond to successes and challenges. They access and interpret health and physical activity information from a variety of sources and identify a range of places where they can seek help to enhance their health and wellbeing. They understand and apply movement concepts and elements of movement to a variety of physical activities, and describe the key features of health related fitness. 
Students demonstrate strategies that enable diverse groups to work together. They apply effective decision making and problem solving skills in health and movement contexts. They demonstrate and refine a range of movement skills and perform them with increasing accuracy and control in a variety of physical activities. They apply and refine movement concepts and strategies in more complex games, sports, and activities.

Year 6

Overview

H & PE at Garden College attempts to provide students with knowledge, understanding and skills to allow them to enhance their own and others’ health and wellbeing in varied and changing contexts. Integral to H & PE is the acquisition of movement skills, concepts and strategies that enable students to confidently and competently participate in a range of physical activities.

Lesson Structure

H & PE lessons are conducted in both indoor and outdoor settings with an emphasis on teamwork and control over body movements. Students are taught specific movements as a powerful medium for a range of personal, interpersonal, behavioural, social and cognitive skills. Students gain expertise in movement skills, physical activities and physical fitness through a range of games and activities.

Scope and Sequence

In Year 6, students refine and expand their range of skills, and perform them with increasing precision, accuracy and control in more complex movements, sequences and games. Students begin to observe, and give constructive feedback on, the skill performance of their peers.

As students continue to participate in regular periods of moderate to vigorous physical activity, they explore the training principles for improving components of health related fitness and ways to monitor exercise intensity.

 

Table to be developed by staff in 2014.

Assessment

Assessment includes:

  • Checklists
  • Anecdotal notes

Resources

A range of equipment including soft and hard balls, skipping ropes, hoops, bean bags, bats, athletic equipment are used regularly during H & PE lessons, depending on the nature and focus of each lesson.

Benchmarks and Recommendations

Due to Occupational Health and Safety (OH & S) requirements, students are required to wear sports shoes and the appropriate uniform during H & PE lessons. It is also recommended that students have their water bottles with them during H & PE lessons, especially during terms 1 and 4. Garden College’s has Sun Smart Policy and students are required to wear their hats or visors during outdoor H & PE lessons.

 

SACSA framework Health and PE Standard 3

Physical Activity and Participation

  • Demonstrates a range of specialised and individual and team movement skills that enhance their sense of personal and group identity
  • Develops, through participation in health-related fitness activities, an understanding of those activities appropriateness and effectiveness

Personal and Social Development

  • Explains how different ways of describing people influences the way people value and treat themselves and others
  • Identifies physical, social and emotional changes associated with their growth and development, and appreciates differences between people of the same age
  • Assumes different roles when working as part of a cooperative group or team to achieve a shared goal and understands the effects on relationships

Health of Individuals and Communities

  • Analyses a variety of community health issues that affect the and investigates community programs to address them
  • Identifies skills to deal with situations that pose a risk to their health and safety
  • Researches and shares findings about issues related to why individuals and groups have different eating patterns

 

See – ACARA Health and Physical Education draft curriculum for national consultation – Dec 2012

http://www.achpersa.com.au/

Some other useful information I found

Here are the motor skills, movement patterns, and movement concepts our program stresses:

  • Locomotor Skills:
  • Running, Shuffling, Skipping, Hopping, Leaping, Crawling, Chasing, Fleeing
  • Body Management:
  • Balance, Jumping/Landing, Weight Transfer
  • Manipulatives:
    • Throwing, Catching, Rolling, Hand Dribbling, Foot Dribbling, Foot Passing
    • Rhythm:
    • Jumping Rope (Individual and Double Dutch), Hula Hoop
  • Cooperatives:
    • Pairs, Small group activities
  • Fitness:
    • Strength Training, Cardiovascular Fitness, Flexibility (Stretching)
  • Spatial Awareness:
    • Personal Space, General Space, Boundaries, Levels of Movement
  • Concepts:
    • Agility, Uses feedback to improve performance, correct form for motor skills

Year-Reception (FOUNDATION)

Overview

Quran classes aim to teach students to read, memorise as well as translate. Students progress from gaining familiarity with Arabic and primary level reading (Level 1-4) up through to fluent reading (Level 5 to Quran). Students are taught to read Arabic text of the Holy Qur’an while applying the “Rules of Recitation (Tajweed)” by use of the rules of pause, alteration of the letter, thin sound vs. broad sound, and nasalization. Students memorise selected Surats from the last Juzz of the Holy Qur’an (Juzz Amma). Students also gain a general understanding of the meaning of some verses they are studying and they relate the Qur’an to their lives by analysing stories in the Qur’an, historical incidents and the moral lessons to be learned.

Lesson Structure

In Quran lessons students are in 2 groups, with the first group reading between the levels of 1-4, while the second group referring to students reading from Level to Quran.

Scope and Sequence

The methodology of teaching Quran at Garden College is through a program which is designed into Five (5) levels that help students to acquire Quran education gradually and consistently. For Year Reception only, Iqra Series Books are used to support students. Depending on student’s progress and achievement, the classroom teacher may also begin to use “Alif Ba An Easy Guide In Learning the Holy Quran” as well.

Level 1 Beginners —> Alif Ba Book   Unit 1-5 and

Level 2 Intermediate —> Alif Ba Book   Unit 6-9

Level 3 Upper Intermediate —> Alif Ba Book   Unit 10-13

Level 4 Advanced —> Alif Ba Book   Unit 14-17

Level 5 Upper Advanced —> Alif Ba Book   Unit 18Quran

 

 

Primary Quran Memorisation Benchmark

N Surats N Surats
1 AL-FATIHA 20 AT-TIN
2 ANASS 21 ASHARH
3 AL-FALAQ 22 ADUHAA
4 AL-IKHLASS 23 AL-LAYL
5 AL-MASSAD 24 ASHAMS
6 AN-NASR 25 AL-BALAD
7 AL-KAFIRUN 26 AL-FAJR
8 AL-KAWTHAR 27 AL-GHASHIYA
9 AL-MAUN 28 AL-AALA
10 QURAISH 29 ATARIK
11 AL-FEEL 30 AL-BURUJ
12 AL-HUMAZA 31 AL-INSHIQAQ
13 AL-ASR 32 AL-MUTAFEFEN
14 ATTAKATHUR 33 AL-INFITAR
15 AL-QARIAH 34 ATAKWIR
16 AL-ADYAT 35 ABASSA
17 AZ-ZALZALA 36 AN-NAZIAT
18 AL-BAYNAH 37 AN-NABA
19 AL-QADR
20 AL-AALAQ

 

Assessment

Assessment during Quran lessons are mainly informal and include:

  • Diagnostic assessment whilst listening to students
  • Anecdotal notes
  • Checklists

Resources

Other Resources referenced and used during Quran classes include:

  • Quran Holy Book
  • Quran CD
  • Iqra Series Books (1-6) / Alif Ba Book
  • Quran Video, Interactive Whiteboard, Ipads
  • Classroom Audio System
  • Internet Web Quran @: Tanzil.net / Reciter.Org / Garden College Website.

Benchmarks & Recommendations

After being tested by the teacher, students are given tailored homework for the next Quran lesson. Parents are advised to check their child’s Quran Folder and their timetable for the next Quran lesson and make sure the given homework is completed and the Quran folder signed.

Students are to read Quran every day. For optimum results Insha Allah, 2 sessions are recommended. Please make sure that the following are available:

  • A quiet area where your child can listen to Quran from CD’s or Quran Web.(Please avoid any disturbing sound when listening to Quran).
  • A CD player system with head phones.
  • Quran Book (If he/she can read) to be able to follow the reciter.
  • Allow Two (2) sessions a day, Morning and Afternoon 30 minutes each.

Better results can be obtained if sessions are consistently conducted in the morning before school time and in the evening.

Year 1

Overview

Quran classes aim to teach students to read, memorise as well as translate. Students progress from gaining familiarity with Arabic and primary level reading (Level 1-4) up through to fluent reading (Level 5 to Quran). Students are taught to read Arabic text of the Holy Qur’an while applying the “Rules of Recitation (Tajweed)” by use of the rules of pause, alteration of the letter, thin sound vs. broad sound, and nasalization. Students memorise selected Surats from the last Juzz of the Holy Qur’an (Juzz Amma). Students also gain a general understanding of the meaning of some verses they are studying and they relate the Qur’an to their lives by analysing stories in the Qur’an, historical incidents and the moral lessons to be learned.

Lesson Structure

In Quran lessons students are in 2 groups, with the first group reading between the levels of 1-4, while the second group referring to students reading from Level to Quran.

Scope and Sequence

The methodology of teaching Quran at Garden College is through a program which is designed into Five (5) levels that help students to acquire Quran education gradually and consistently. For Year Reception only, Iqra Series Books are used to support students. Depending on student’s progress and achievement, the classroom teacher may also begin to use “Alif Ba An Easy Guide In Learning the Holy Quran” as well.

Level 1 Beginners —> Alif Ba Book   Unit 1-5 and

Level 2 Intermediate —> Alif Ba Book   Unit 6-9

Level 3 Upper Intermediate —> Alif Ba Book   Unit 10-13

Level 4 Advanced —> Alif Ba Book   Unit 14-17

Level 5 Upper Advanced —> Alif Ba Book   Unit 18Quran

 

 

Primary Quran Memorisation Benchmark

N Surats N Surats
1 AL-FATIHA 20 AT-TIN
2 ANASS 21 ASHARH
3 AL-FALAQ 22 ADUHAA
4 AL-IKHLASS 23 AL-LAYL
5 AL-MASSAD 24 ASHAMS
6 AN-NASR 25 AL-BALAD
7 AL-KAFIRUN 26 AL-FAJR
8 AL-KAWTHAR 27 AL-GHASHIYA
9 AL-MAUN 28 AL-AALA
10 QURAISH 29 ATARIK
11 AL-FEEL 30 AL-BURUJ
12 AL-HUMAZA 31 AL-INSHIQAQ
13 AL-ASR 32 AL-MUTAFEFEN
14 ATTAKATHUR 33 AL-INFITAR
15 AL-QARIAH 34 ATAKWIR
16 AL-ADYAT 35 ABASSA
17 AZ-ZALZALA 36 AN-NAZIAT
18 AL-BAYNAH 37 AN-NABA
19 AL-QADR
20 AL-AALAQ

 

Assessment

Assessment during Quran lessons are mainly informal and include:

  • Diagnostic assessment whilst listening to students
  • Anecdotal notes
  • Checklists

Resources

Other Resources referenced and used during Quran classes include:

  • Quran Holy Book
  • Quran CD
  • Iqra Series Books (1-6) / Alif Ba Book
  • Quran Video, Interactive Whiteboard, Ipads
  • Classroom Audio System
  • Internet Web Quran @: Tanzil.net / Reciter.Org / Garden College Website.

Benchmarks & Recommendations

After being tested by the teacher, students are given tailored homework for the next Quran lesson. Parents are advised to check their child’s Quran Folder and their time table for the next Quran lesson and make sure the given homework is completed and the Quran folder signed.

Students are to read Quran every day. For optimum results Insha Allah, 2 sessions are recommended. Please make sure that the following are available:

  • A quiet area where your child can listen to Quran from CD’s or Quran Web.(Please avoid any disturbing sound when listening to Quran).
  • A CD player system with head phones.
  • Quran Book (If he/she can read) to be able to follow the reciter.
  • Allow Two (2) sessions a day, Morning and Afternoon 30 minutes each.

Better results can be obtained if sessions are consistently conducted in the morning before school time and in the evening.

Year 2

Overview

Quran classes aim to teach students to read, memorise as well as translate. Students progress from gaining familiarity with Arabic and primary level reading (Level 1-4) up through to fluent reading (Level 5 to Quran). Students are taught to read Arabic text of the Holy Qur’an while applying the “Rules of Recitation (Tajweed)” by use of the rules of pause, alteration of the letter, thin sound vs. broad sound, and nasalization. Students memorise selected Surats from the last Juzz of the Holy Qur’an (Juzz Amma). Students also gain a general understanding of the meaning of some verses they are studying and they relate the Qur’an to their lives by analysing stories in the Qur’an, historical incidents and the moral lessons to be learned.

Lesson Structure

In Quran lessons students are in 2 groups, with the first group reading between the levels of 1-4, while the second group referring to students reading from Level to Quran.

Scope and Sequence

The methodology of teaching Quran at Garden College is through a program which is designed into Five (5) levels that help students to acquire Quran education gradually and consistently. For Reception only, Iqra Series Books are used to support students. Depending on student’s progress and achievement, the classroom teacher may also begin to use “Alif Ba An Easy Guide In Learning the Holy Quran” as well.

Level 1 Beginners —> Alif Ba Book   Unit 1-5 and

Level 2 Intermediate —> Alif Ba Book   Unit 6-9

Level 3 Upper Intermediate —> Alif Ba Book   Unit 10-13

Level 4 Advanced —> Alif Ba Book   Unit 14-17

Level 5 Upper Advanced —> Alif Ba Book   Unit 18Quran

 

 

Primary Quran Memorisation Benchmark

N Surats N Surats
1 AL-FATIHA 20 AT-TIN
2 ANASS 21 ASHARH
3 AL-FALAQ 22 ADUHAA
4 AL-IKHLASS 23 AL-LAYL
5 AL-MASSAD 24 ASHAMS
6 AN-NASR 25 AL-BALAD
7 AL-KAFIRUN 26 AL-FAJR
8 AL-KAWTHAR 27 AL-GHASHIYA
9 AL-MAUN 28 AL-AALA
10 QURAISH 29 ATARIK
11 AL-FEEL 30 AL-BURUJ
12 AL-HUMAZA 31 AL-INSHIQAQ
13 AL-ASR 32 AL-MUTAFEFEN
14 ATTAKATHUR 33 AL-INFITAR
15 AL-QARIAH 34 ATAKWIR
16 AL-ADYAT 35 ABASSA
17 AZ-ZALZALA 36 AN-NAZIAT
18 AL-BAYNAH 37 AN-NABA
19 AL-QADR
20 AL-AALAQ

 

Assessment

Assessment during Quran lessons are mainly informal and include:

  • Diagnostic assessment whilst listening to students
  • Anecdotal notes
  • Checklists

Resources

Other Resources referenced and used during Quran classes include:

  • Quran Holy Book
  • Quran CD
  • Iqra Series Books (1-6) / Alif Ba Book
  • Quran Video, Interactive Whiteboard, Ipads
  • Classroom Audio System
  • Internet Web Quran @: Tanzil.net / Reciter.Org / Garden College Website.

Benchmarks & Recommendations

After being tested by the teacher, students are given tailored homework for the next Quran lesson. Parents are advised to check their child’s Quran Folder and their timetable for the next Quran lesson and make sure the given homework is completed and the Quran folder signed.

Students are to read Quran every day. For optimum results Insha Allah, 2 sessions are recommended. Please make sure that the following are available:

  • A quiet area where your child can listen to Quran from CD’s or Quran Web.(Please avoid any disturbing sound when listening to Quran).
  • A CD player system with head phones.
  • Quran Book (If he/she can read) to be able to follow the reciter.
  • Allow Two (2) sessions a day, Morning and Afternoon 30 minutes each.

Better results can be obtained if sessions are consistently conducted in the morning before school time and in the evening.

Year 3

Overview

Quran classes aim to teach students to read, memorise as well as translate. Students progress from gaining familiarity with Arabic and primary level reading (Level 1-4) up through to fluent reading (Level 5 to Quran). Students are taught to read Arabic text of the Holy Qur’an while applying the “Rules of Recitation (Tajweed)” by use of the rules of pause, alteration of the letter, thin sound vs. broad sound, and nasalization. Students memorise selected Surats from the last Juzz of the Holy Qur’an (Juzz Amma). Students also gain a general understanding of the meaning of some verses they are studying and they relate the Qur’an to their lives by analysing stories in the Qur’an, historical incidents and the moral lessons to be learned.

Lesson Structure

In Quran students are in 2 groups, with the first group reading between the levels of 1-4, while the second group referring to students reading from Level to Quran.

Scope and Sequence

The methodology of teaching Quran at Garden College is through a program which is designed into Five (5) levels that help students to acquire Quran education gradually and consistently. For Reception students only, Iqra Series Books are used to support students. Depending on student’s progress and achievement, the classroom teacher may also begin to use “Alif Ba An Easy Guide In Learning the Holy Quran” as well.

Level 1 Beginners —> Alif Ba Book   Unit 1-5 and

Level 2 Intermediate —> Alif Ba Book   Unit 6-9

Level 3 Upper Intermediate —> Alif Ba Book   Unit 10-13

Level 4 Advanced —> Alif Ba Book   Unit 14-17

Level 5 Upper Advanced —> Alif Ba Book   Unit 18Quran

 

 

Primary Quran Memorisation Benchmark

N Surats N Surats
1 AL-FATIHA 20 AT-TIN
2 ANASS 21 ASHARH
3 AL-FALAQ 22 ADUHAA
4 AL-IKHLASS 23 AL-LAYL
5 AL-MASSAD 24 ASHAMS
6 AN-NASR 25 AL-BALAD
7 AL-KAFIRUN 26 AL-FAJR
8 AL-KAWTHAR 27 AL-GHASHIYA
9 AL-MAUN 28 AL-AALA
10 QURAISH 29 ATARIK
11 AL-FEEL 30 AL-BURUJ
12 AL-HUMAZA 31 AL-INSHIQAQ
13 AL-ASR 32 AL-MUTAFEFEN
14 ATTAKATHUR 33 AL-INFITAR
15 AL-QARIAH 34 ATAKWIR
16 AL-ADYAT 35 ABASSA
17 AZ-ZALZALA 36 AN-NAZIAT
18 AL-BAYNAH 37 AN-NABA
19 AL-QADR
20 AL-AALAQ

 

Assessment

Assessment during Quran lessons are mainly informal and include:

  • Diagnostic assessment whilst listening to students
  • Anecdotal notes
  • Checklists

Resources

Other Resources referenced and used during Quran classes include:

  • Quran Holy Book
  • Quran CD
  • Iqra Series Books (1-6) / Alif Ba Book
  • Quran Video, Interactive Whiteboard, Ipads
  • Classroom Audio System
  • Internet Web Quran @: Tanzil.net / Reciter.Org / Garden College Website.

 

Benchmarks & Recommendations

After being tested by the teacher, students are given tailored homework for the next Quran lesson. Parents are advised to check their child’s Quran Folder and their timetable for the next Quran lesson and make sure the given homework is completed and the Quran folder signed.

Students are to read Quran every day. For optimum results Insha Allah, 2 sessions are recommended. Please make sure that the following are available:

  • A quiet area where your child can listen to Quran from CD’s or Quran Web.(Please avoid any disturbing sound when listening to Quran).
  • A CD player system with head phones.
  • Quran Book (If he/she can read) to be able to follow the reciter.
  • Allow Two (2) sessions a day, Morning and Afternoon 30 minutes each.

Better results can be obtained if sessions are consistently conducted in the morning before school time and in the evening.

Year 4

Overview

Quran classes aim to teach students to read, memorise as well as translate. Students progress from gaining familiarity with Arabic and primary level reading (Level 1-4) up through to fluent reading (Level 5 to Quran). Students are taught to read Arabic text of the Holy Qur’an while applying the “Rules of Recitation (Tajweed)” by use of the rules of pause, alteration of the letter, thin sound vs. broad sound, and nasalization. Students memorise selected Surats from the last Juzz of the Holy Qur’an (Juzz Amma). Students also gain a general understanding of the meaning of some verses they are studying and they relate the Qur’an to their lives by analysing stories in the Qur’an, historical incidents and the moral lessons to be learned.

Lesson Structure

In Quran lessons students are in 2 groups, with the first group reading between the levels of 1-4, while the second group referring to students reading from Level to Quran.

Scope and Sequence

The methodology of teaching Quran at Garden College is through a program which is designed into Five (5) levels that help students to acquire Quran education gradually and consistently. For Reception students only, Iqra Series Books are used to support students. Depending on student’s progress and achievement, the classroom teacher may also begin to use “Alif Ba An Easy Guide In Learning the Holy Quran” as well.

Level 1 Beginners —> Alif Ba Book   Unit 1-5 and

Level 2 Intermediate —> Alif Ba Book   Unit 6-9

Level 3 Upper Intermediate —> Alif Ba Book   Unit 10-13

Level 4 Advanced —> Alif Ba Book   Unit 14-17

Level 5 Upper Advanced —> Alif Ba Book   Unit 18Quran

 

 

Primary Quran Memorisation Benchmark

N Surats N Surats
1 AL-FATIHA 20 AT-TIN
2 ANASS 21 ASHARH
3 AL-FALAQ 22 ADUHAA
4 AL-IKHLASS 23 AL-LAYL
5 AL-MASSAD 24 ASHAMS
6 AN-NASR 25 AL-BALAD
7 AL-KAFIRUN 26 AL-FAJR
8 AL-KAWTHAR 27 AL-GHASHIYA
9 AL-MAUN 28 AL-AALA
10 QURAISH 29 ATARIK
11 AL-FEEL 30 AL-BURUJ
12 AL-HUMAZA 31 AL-INSHIQAQ
13 AL-ASR 32 AL-MUTAFEFEN
14 ATTAKATHUR 33 AL-INFITAR
15 AL-QARIAH 34 ATAKWIR
16 AL-ADYAT 35 ABASSA
17 AZ-ZALZALA 36 AN-NAZIAT
18 AL-BAYNAH 37 AN-NABA
19 AL-QADR
20 AL-AALAQ

Assessment

Assessment during Quran lessons are mainly informal and include:

  • Diagnostic assessment whilst listening to students
  • Anecdotal notes
  • Checklists

Resources

Other Resources referenced and used during Quran classes include:

  • Quran Holy Book
  • Quran CD
  • Iqra Series Books (1-6) / Alif Ba Book
  • Quran Video, Interactive Whiteboard, Ipads
  • Classroom Audio System
  • Internet Web Quran @: Tanzil.net / Reciter.Org / Garden College Website.

 

Benchmarks & Recommendations

After being tested by the teacher, students are given tailored homework for the next Quran lesson. Parents are advised to check their child’s Quran Folder and their timetable for the next Quran lesson and make sure the given homework is completed and the Quran folder signed.

Students are to read Quran every day. For optimum results Insha Allah, 2 sessions are recommended. Please make sure that the following are available:

  • A quiet area where your child can listen to Quran from CD’s or Quran Web.(Please avoid any disturbing sound when listening to Quran).
  • A CD player system with head phones.
  • Quran Book (If he/she can read) to be able to follow the reciter.
  • Allow Two (2) sessions a day, Morning and Afternoon 30 minutes each.

Better results can be obtained if sessions are consistently conducted in the morning before school time and in the evening.

Year 5

Overview

Quran classes aim to teach students to read, memorise as well as translate. Students progress from gaining familiarity with Arabic and primary level reading (Level 1-4) up through to fluent reading (Level 5 to Quran). Students are taught to read Arabic text of the Holy Qur’an while applying the “Rules of Recitation (Tajweed)” by use of the rules of pause, alteration of the letter, thin sound vs. broad sound, and nasalization. Students memorise selected Surats from the last Juzz of the Holy Qur’an (Juzz Amma). Students also gain a general understanding of the meaning of some verses they are studying and they relate the Qur’an to their lives by analysing stories in the Qur’an, historical incidents and the moral lessons to be learned.

Lesson Structure

In Quran lessons students are in 2 groups, with the first group reading between the levels of 1-4, while the second group referring to students reading from Level to Quran.

Scope and Sequence

The methodology of teaching Quran at Garden College is through a program which is designed into Five (5) levels that help students to acquire Quran education gradually and consistently. For Year Reception only, Iqra Series Books are used to support students. Depending on student’s progress and achievement, the classroom teacher may also begin to use “Alif Ba An Easy Guide In Learning the Holy Quran” as well.

Level 1 Beginners —> Alif Ba Book   Unit 1-5 and

Level 2 Intermediate —> Alif Ba Book   Unit 6-9

Level 3 Upper Intermediate —> Alif Ba Book   Unit 10-13

Level 4 Advanced —> Alif Ba Book   Unit 14-17

Level 5 Upper Advanced —> Alif Ba Book   Unit 18Quran

 

 

 

Primary Quran Memorisation Benchmark

N Surats N Surats
1 AL-FATIHA 20 AT-TIN
2 ANASS 21 ASHARH
3 AL-FALAQ 22 ADUHAA
4 AL-IKHLASS 23 AL-LAYL
5 AL-MASSAD 24 ASHAMS
6 AN-NASR 25 AL-BALAD
7 AL-KAFIRUN 26 AL-FAJR
8 AL-KAWTHAR 27 AL-GHASHIYA
9 AL-MAUN 28 AL-AALA
10 QURAISH 29 ATARIK
11 AL-FEEL 30 AL-BURUJ
12 AL-HUMAZA 31 AL-INSHIQAQ
13 AL-ASR 32 AL-MUTAFEFEN
14 ATTAKATHUR 33 AL-INFITAR
15 AL-QARIAH 34 ATAKWIR
16 AL-ADYAT 35 ABASSA
17 AZ-ZALZALA 36 AN-NAZIAT
18 AL-BAYNAH 37 AN-NABA
19 AL-QADR
20 AL-AALAQ

Assessment

Assessment during Quran lessons are mainly informal and include:

  • Diagnostic assessment whilst listening to students
  • Anecdotal notes
  • Checklists

Resources

Other Resources referenced and used during Quran classes include:

  • Quran Holy Book
  • Quran CD
  • Iqra Series Books (1-6) / Alif Ba Book
  • Quran Video, Interactive Whiteboard, Ipads
  • Classroom Audio System
  • Internet Web Quran @: Tanzil.net / Reciter.Org / Garden College Website.

 

 

Benchmarks & Recommendations

After being tested by the teacher, students are given tailored homework for the next Quran lesson. Parents are advised to check their child’s Quran Folder and their timetable for the next Quran lesson and make sure the given homework is completed and the Quran folder signed.

Students are to read Quran every day. For optimum results Insha Allah, 2 sessions are recommended. Please make sure that the following are available:

  • A quiet area where your child can listen to Quran from CD’s or Quran Web.(Please avoid any disturbing sound when listening to Quran).
  • A CD player system with head phones.
  • Quran Book (If he/she can read) to be able to follow the reciter.
  • Allow Two (2) sessions a day, Morning and Afternoon 30 minutes each.

Better results can be obtained if sessions are consistently conducted in the morning before school time and in the evening.

Year 6

Overview

Quran classes aim to teach students to read, memorise as well as translate. Students progress from gaining familiarity with Arabic and primary level reading (Level 1-4) up through to fluent reading (Level 5 to Quran). Students are taught to read Arabic text of the Holy Qur’an while applying the “Rules of Recitation (Tajweed)” by use of the rules of pause, alteration of the letter, thin sound vs. broad sound, and nasalization. Students memorise selected Surats from the last Juzz of the Holy Qur’an (Juzz Amma). Students also gain a general understanding of the meaning of some verses they are studying and they relate the Qur’an to their lives by analysing stories in the Qur’an, historical incidents and the moral lessons to be learned.

Lesson Structure

In Quran lessons students are in 2 groups, with the first group reading between the levels of 1-4, while the second group referring to students reading from Level to Quran.

Scope and Sequence

The methodology of teaching Quran at Garden College is through a program which is designed into Five (5) levels that help students to acquire Quran education gradually and consistently. For Year Reception only, Iqra Series Books are used to support students. Depending on student’s progress and achievement, the classroom teacher may also begin to use “Alif Ba An Easy Guide In Learning the Holy Quran” as well.

Level 1 Beginners —> Alif Ba Book   Unit 1-5 and

Level 2 Intermediate —> Alif Ba Book   Unit 6-9

Level 3 Upper Intermediate —> Alif Ba Book   Unit 10-13

Level 4 Advanced —> Alif Ba Book   Unit 14-17

Level 5 Upper Advanced —> Alif Ba Book   Unit 18Quran

 

Primary Quran Memorisation Benchmark

N Surats N Surats
1 AL-FATIHA 20 AT-TIN
2 ANASS 21 ASHARH
3 AL-FALAQ 22 ADUHAA
4 AL-IKHLASS 23 AL-LAYL
5 AL-MASSAD 24 ASHAMS
6 AN-NASR 25 AL-BALAD
7 AL-KAFIRUN 26 AL-FAJR
8 AL-KAWTHAR 27 AL-GHASHIYA
9 AL-MAUN 28 AL-AALA
10 QURAISH 29 ATARIK
11 AL-FEEL 30 AL-BURUJ
12 AL-HUMAZA 31 AL-INSHIQAQ
13 AL-ASR 32 AL-MUTAFEFEN
14 ATTAKATHUR 33 AL-INFITAR
15 AL-QARIAH 34 ATAKWIR
16 AL-ADYAT 35 ABASSA
17 AZ-ZALZALA 36 AN-NAZIAT
18 AL-BAYNAH 37 AN-NABA
19 AL-QADR
20 AL-AALAQ

Assessment

Assessment during Quran lessons are mainly informal and include:

  • Diagnostic assessment whilst listening to students
  • Anecdotal notes
  • Checklists

Resources

Other Resources referenced and used during Quran classes include:

  • Quran Holy Book
  • Quran CD
  • Iqra Series Books (1-6) / Alif Ba Book
  • Quran Video, Interactive Whiteboard, Ipads
  • Classroom Audio System
  • Internet Web Quran @: Tanzil.net / Reciter.Org / Garden College Website.

Benchmarks & Recommendations

After being tested by the teacher, students are given tailored homework for the next Quran lesson. Parents are advised to check their child’s Quran Folder and their timetable for the next Quran lesson and make sure the given homework is completed and the Quran folder signed.

Students are to read Quran every day. For optimum results Insha Allah, 2 sessions are recommended. Please make sure that the following are available:

  • A quiet area where your child can listen to Quran from CD’s or Quran Web.(Please avoid any disturbing sound when listening to Quran).
  • A CD player system with head phones.
  • Quran Book (If he/she can read) to be able to follow the reciter.
  • Allow Two (2) sessions a day, Morning and Afternoon 30 minutes each.

Better results can be obtained if sessions are consistently conducted in the morning before school time and in the evening.

Islamic Studies

Islam teaches that human beings have a moral obligation to live in harmony with one another. Islam also recognizes and accords rights to all human beings regardless of race, colour or creed. The Islamic Studies curriculum at Garden College aims to embed this understanding amongst students whilst teaching students the fundamental practices and obligations that all humans must observe, to be responsible and active Muslims in an ever changing society.

Reception

Overview

At Garden College, Islamic Studies lessons primarily aim to allow students to develop a deep understanding of who their creator is and his divine attributes. In addition, Islamic Studies lessons also include the teaching of:

  • Aqeedah; to understand the creed that makes up Islam. This is divided into 6 parts.
  • Belief in God -Allah, the One and Only One worthy of all worship
  • Belief in the Angels – Mala’ikah
  • Belief in the Books sent by Allah (including the Qurʾān). – Kutub
  • Belief in all the Messengers sent by Allah – Rasul
  • Belief in the Day of Judgment and in the Resurrection (life after death) – Qiyamah
  • Belief in Destiny/Fate – Qadar
  • Seerah; to learn about the lives of Prophets from Adam (A.S) to Muhammed (S.A.W)
  • Fiqh; with hadiths from the Hanafi School of thought in accordance with the four recognized schools of thought
  • Adab and Akhlaq; through the teaching of daily duas and manners in everyday life for them to be constant remembrance of their Lord

Lesson Structure

Islamic Studies lessons aim to cultivate a love for Allah and his messenger and to establish a solid foundational understanding of the principles, practices and beliefs of Islam. Students will gain an awareness of Islam’s integral relevance to their daily lives and how this shapes the way they interact with and view the world. The Islamic Studies department aims to use a hands-on approach using a range of media (books, videos, Ipads, interactive whiteboard) and activities to enhance students’ interest and understanding to consolidate their learning.

Scope and Sequence

Each term, there will be an emphasis on one topic from Reception to Year 6 (as outlined in the table below) with minor focuses alongside it; which will include lessons from seerah, fiqh, adab and akhlaq.

Islamic Studies Scope and Sequence from Reception to Year 6
Term 1 Term 2 Term 3 Term 4
Tawheed /Aqeedah and Salat Salat and Wudhu continued Sawm Hajj

Assessment

Assessment includes:

  • Participation in discussions, activities and classwork
  • Oral tests
  • Observation and anecdotal notes

Resources

Hassan L. & Ghazi. K. T.,Our Religion is Islam,1995, IQRA International Educational Foundation.

Saniyasnain. Quran Stories for little hearts , 2003,Goodword Kidz,

My Wudhu Book, My Prayer Book, My Dua Book; 2001, Darussalam Publishers.

Benchmarks & Recommendations

It is recommended that parents reinforce the Islamic values, morals and lessons taught at school and have discussions with their children to provide them with guidance. It is also advised that when performing Islamic duties in day to day living such as wudhu and salat, parents talk to their children about the actions they are performing and involve them too.

Year 1

Overview

At Garden College, Islamic Studies lessons primarily aim to allow students to develop a deep understanding of who their creator is and his divine attributes. In addition, Islamic Studies lessons also include the teaching of:

  • Aqeedah; to understand the creed that makes up Islam. This is divided into 6 parts.
  • Belief in God -Allah, the One and Only One worthy of all worship
  • Belief in the Angels – Mala’ikah
  • Belief in the Books sent by Allah (including the Qurʾān). – Kutub
  • Belief in all the Messengers sent by Allah – Rasul
  • Belief in the Day of Judgment and in the Resurrection (life after death) – Qiyamah
  • Belief in Destiny/Fate – Qadar
  • Seerah; to learn about the lives of Prophets from Adam (A.S) to Muhammed (S.A.W)
  • Fiqh; with hadiths from the Hanafi School of thought in accordance with the four recognized schools of thought
  • Adab and Akhlaq; through the teaching of daily duas and manners in everyday life for them to be constant remembrance of their Lord

Lesson Structure

Islamic Studies lessons aim to cultivate a love for Allah and his messenger and to establish a solid foundational understanding of the principles, practices and beliefs of Islam. Students will gain an awareness of Islam’s integral relevance to their daily lives and how this shapes the way they interact with and view the world. The Islamic Studies department aims to use a hands-on approach using a range of media (books, videos, Ipads, interactive whiteboard) and activities to enhance students’ interest and understanding to consolidate their learning.

Scope and Sequence

Each term, there will be an emphasis on one topic from Reception to Year 6 (as outlined in the table below) with minor focuses alongside it; which will include lessons from seerah, fiqh, adab and akhlaq.

Islamic Studies Scope and Sequence from Reception to Year 6
Term 1 Term 2 Term 3 Term 4
Tawheed /Aqeedah and Salat Salat and Wudhu continued Sawm Hajj

Assessment

Assessment includes:

  • Participation in discussions, activities and classwork
  • Oral tests
  • Observation and anecdotal notes

Resources

Hassan L. & Ghazi. K. T.,Our Religion is Islam,1995, IQRA International Educational Foundation.

Saniyasnain. Quran Stories for little hearts , 2003,Goodword Kidz,

My Wudhu Book, My Prayer Book, My Dua Book; 2001, Darussalam Publishers.

Benchmarks & Recommendations

It is recommended that parents reinforce the Islamic values, morals and lessons taught at school and have discussions with their children to provide them with guidance. It is also advised that when performing Islamic duties in day to day living such as wudhu and salat, parents talk to their children about the actions they are performing and involve them too.

Year 2

Overview

At Garden College, Islamic Studies lessons primarily aim to allow students to develop a deep understanding of who their creator is and his divine attributes. In addition, Islamic Studies lessons also include the teaching of:

  • Aqeedah; to understand the creed that makes up Islam. This is divided into 6 parts.
  • Belief in God -Allah, the One and Only One worthy of all worship
  • Belief in the Angels – Mala’ikah
  • Belief in the Books sent by Allah (including the Qurʾān). – Kutub
  • Belief in all the Messengers sent by Allah – Rasul
  • Belief in the Day of Judgment and in the Resurrection (life after death) – Qiyamah
  • Belief in Destiny/Fate – Qadar
  • Seerah; to learn about the lives of Prophets from Adam (A.S) to Muhammed (S.A.W)
  • Fiqh; with hadiths from the Hanafi School of thought in accordance with the four recognized schools of thought
  • Adab and Akhlaq; through the teaching of daily duas and manners in everyday life for them to be constant remembrance of their Lord

Lesson Structure

Islamic Studies lessons aim to cultivate a love for Allah and his messenger and to establish a solid foundational understanding of the principles, practices and beliefs of Islam. Students will gain an awareness of Islam’s integral relevance to their daily lives and how this shapes the way they interact with and view the world. The Islamic Studies department aims to use a hands-on approach using a range of media (books, videos, Ipads, interactive whiteboard) and activities to enhance students’ interest and understanding to consolidate their learning.

Scope and Sequence

Each term, there will be an emphasis on one topic from Reception to Year 6 (as outlined in the table below) with minor focuses alongside it; which will include lessons from seerah, fiqh, adab and akhlaq.

Islamic Studies Scope and Sequence from Reception to Year 6
Term 1 Term 2 Term 3 Term 4
Tawheed /Aqeedah and Salat Salat and Wudhu continued Sawm Hajj

Assessment

Assessment includes:

  • Participation in discussions, activities and classwork
  • Oral tests
  • Observation and anecdotal notes

Resources

Hassan L. & Ghazi. K. T.,Our Religion is Islam,1995, IQRA International Educational Foundation.

Saniyasnain. Quran Stories for little hearts , 2003,Goodword Kidz,

My Wudhu Book, My Prayer Book, My Dua Book; 2001, Darussalam Publishers.

Benchmarks & Recommendations

It is recommended that parents reinforce the Islamic values, morals and lessons taught at school and have discussions with their children to provide them with guidance. It is also advised that when performing Islamic duties in day to day living such as wudhu and salat, parents talk to their children about the actions they are performing and involve them too.

Year 3

Overview

At Garden College, Islamic Studies lessons primarily aim to allow students to develop a deep understanding of who their creator is and his divine attributes. In addition, Islamic Studies lessons also include the teaching of:

  • Aqeedah; to understand the creed that makes up Islam. This is divided into 6 parts.
  • Belief in God -Allah, the One and Only One worthy of all worship
  • Belief in the Angels – Mala’ikah
  • Belief in the Books sent by Allah (including the Qurʾān). – Kutub
  • Belief in all the Messengers sent by Allah – Rasul
  • Belief in the Day of Judgment and in the Resurrection (life after death) – Qiyamah
  • Belief in Destiny/Fate – Qadar
  • Seerah; to learn about the lives of Prophets from Adam (A.S) to Muhammed (S.A.W)
  • Fiqh; with hadiths from the Hanafi School of thought in accordance with the four recognized schools of thought
  • Adab and Akhlaq; through the teaching of daily duas and manners in everyday life for them to be constant remembrance of their Lord

Lesson Structure

Islamic Studies lessons aim to cultivate a love for Allah and his messenger and to establish a solid foundational understanding of the principles, practices and beliefs of Islam. Students will gain an awareness of Islam’s integral relevance to their daily lives and how this shapes the way they interact with and view the world. The Islamic Studies department aims to use a hands-on approach using a range of media (books, videos, Ipads, interactive whiteboard) and activities to enhance students’ interest and understanding to consolidate their learning.

Scope and Sequence

Each term, there will be an emphasis on one topic from Reception to Year 6 (as outlined in the table below) with minor focuses alongside it; which will include lessons from seerah, fiqh, adab and akhlaq.

 

Islamic Studies Scope and Sequence from Reception to Year 6
Term 1 Term 2 Term 3 Term 4
Tawheed /Aqeedah and Salat Salat and Wudhu continued Sawm Hajj

Assessment

Assessment includes:

  • Participation in discussions, activities and classwork
  • Oral tests
  • Observation and anecdotal notes

Resources

Hassan L. & Ghazi. K. T.,Our Religion is Islam,1995, IQRA International Educational Foundation.

Saniyasnain. Quran Stories for little hearts , 2003,Goodword Kidz,

My Wudhu Book, My Prayer Book, My Dua Book; 2001, Darussalam Publishers.

Benchmarks & Recommendations

It is recommended that parents reinforce the Islamic values, morals and lessons taught at school and have discussions with their children to provide them with guidance. It is also advised that when performing Islamic duties in day to day living such as wudhu and salat, parents talk to their children about the actions they are performing and involve them too.

Year 4

Overview

At Garden College, Islamic Studies lessons primarily aim to allow students to develop a deep understanding of who their creator is and his divine attributes. In addition, Islamic Studies lessons also include the teaching of:

  • Aqeedah; to understand the creed that makes up Islam. This is divided into 6 parts.
  • Belief in God -Allah, the One and Only One worthy of all worship
  • Belief in the Angels – Mala’ikah
  • Belief in the Books sent by Allah (including the Qurʾān). – Kutub
  • Belief in all the Messengers sent by Allah – Rasul
  • Belief in the Day of Judgment and in the Resurrection (life after death) – Qiyamah
  • Belief in Destiny/Fate – Qadar
  • Seerah; to learn about the lives of Prophets from Adam (A.S) to Muhammed (S.A.W)
  • Fiqh; with hadiths from the Hanafi School of thought in accordance with the four recognized schools of thought
  • Adab and Akhlaq; through the teaching of daily duas and manners in everyday life for them to be constant remembrance of their Lord

Lesson Structure

Islamic Studies lessons aim to cultivate a love for Allah and his messenger and to establish a solid foundational understanding of the principles, practices and beliefs of Islam. Students will gain an awareness of Islam’s integral relevance to their daily lives and how this shapes the way they interact with and view the world. The Islamic Studies department aims to use a hands-on approach using a range of media (books, videos, Ipads, interactive whiteboard) and activities to enhance students’ interest and understanding to consolidate their learning.

Scope and Sequence

Each term, there will be an emphasis on one topic from Reception to Year 6 (as outlined in the table below) with minor focuses alongside it; which will include lessons from seerah, fiqh, adab and akhlaq.

Islamic Studies Scope and Sequence from Reception to Year 6
Term 1 Term 2 Term 3 Term 4
Tawheed /Aqeedah and Salat Salat and Wudhu continued Sawm Hajj

Assessment

Assessment includes:

  • Participation in discussions, activities and classwork
  • Oral tests
  • Observation and anecdotal notes

Resources

Hassan L. & Ghazi. K. T.,Our Religion is Islam,1995, IQRA International Educational Foundation.

Saniyasnain. Quran Stories for little hearts , 2003,Goodword Kidz,

My Wudhu Book, My Prayer Book, My Dua Book; 2001, Darussalam Publishers.

Benchmarks & Recommendations

It is recommended that parents reinforce the Islamic values, morals and lessons taught at school and have discussions with their children to provide them with guidance. It is also advised that when performing Islamic duties in day to day living such as wudhu and salat, parents talk to their children about the actions they are performing and involve them too.

Year 5

Overview

At Garden College, Islamic Studies lessons primarily aim to allow students to develop a deep understanding of who their creator is and his divine attributes. In addition, Islamic Studies lessons also include the teaching of:

  • Aqeedah; to understand the creed that makes up Islam. This is divided into 6 parts.
  • Belief in God -Allah, the One and Only One worthy of all worship
  • Belief in the Angels – Mala’ikah
  • Belief in the Books sent by Allah (including the Qurʾān). – Kutub
  • Belief in all the Messengers sent by Allah – Rasul
  • Belief in the Day of Judgment and in the Resurrection (life after death) – Qiyamah
  • Belief in Destiny/Fate – Qadar
  • Seerah; to learn about the lives of Prophets from Adam (A.S) to Muhammed (S.A.W)
  • Fiqh; with hadiths from the Hanafi School of thought in accordance with the four recognized schools of thought
  • Adab and Akhlaq; through the teaching of daily duas and manners in everyday life for them to be constant remembrance of their Lord

Lesson Structure

Islamic Studies lessons aim to cultivate a love for Allah and his messenger and to establish a solid foundational understanding of the principles, practices and beliefs of Islam. Students will gain an awareness of Islam’s integral relevance to their daily lives and how this shapes the way they interact with and view the world. The Islamic Studies department aims to use a hands-on approach using a range of media (books, videos, Ipads, interactive whiteboard) and activities to enhance students’ interest and understanding to consolidate their learning.

Scope and Sequence

Each term, there will be an emphasis on one topic from Reception to Year 6 (as outlined in the table below) with minor focuses alongside it; which will include lessons from seerah, fiqh, adab and akhlaq.

Islamic Studies Scope and Sequence from Reception to Year 6
Term 1 Term 2 Term 3 Term 4
Tawheed /Aqeedah and Salat Salat and Wudhu continued Sawm Hajj

Assessment

Assessment includes:

  • Participation in discussions, activities and classwork
  • Oral tests
  • Observation and anecdotal notes

Resources

Hassan L. & Ghazi. K. T.,Our Religion is Islam,1995, IQRA International Educational Foundation.

Saniyasnain. Quran Stories for little hearts , 2003,Goodword Kidz,

My Wudhu Book, My Prayer Book, My Dua Book; 2001, Darussalam Publishers.

Benchmarks & Recommendations

It is recommended that parents reinforce the Islamic values, morals and lessons taught at school and have discussions with their children to provide them with guidance. It is also advised that when performing Islamic duties in day to day living such as wudhu and salat, parents talk to their children about the actions they are performing and involve them too.

Year 6

Overview

At Garden College, Islamic Studies lessons primarily aim to allow students to develop a deep understanding of who their creator is and his divine attributes. In addition, Islamic Studies lessons also include the teaching of:

  • Aqeedah; to understand the creed that makes up Islam. This is divided into 6 parts.
  • Belief in God -Allah, the One and Only One worthy of all worship
  • Belief in the Angels – Mala’ikah
  • Belief in the Books sent by Allah (including the Qurʾān). – Kutub
  • Belief in all the Messengers sent by Allah – Rasul
  • Belief in the Day of Judgment and in the Resurrection (life after death) – Qiyamah
  • Belief in Destiny/Fate – Qadar
  • Seerah; to learn about the lives of Prophets from Adam (A.S) to Muhammed (S.A.W)
  • Fiqh; with hadiths from the Hanafi School of thought in accordance with the four recognized schools of thought
  • Adab and Akhlaq; through the teaching of daily duas and manners in everyday life for them to be constant remembrance of their Lord

Lesson Structure

Islamic Studies lessons aim to cultivate a love for Allah and his messenger and to establish a solid foundational understanding of the principles, practices and beliefs of Islam. Students will gain an awareness of Islam’s integral relevance to their daily lives and how this shapes the way they interact with and view the world. The Islamic Studies department aims to use a hands-on approach using a range of media (books, videos, Ipads, interactive whiteboard) and activities to enhance students’ interest and understanding to consolidate their learning.

Scope and Sequence

Each term, there will be an emphasis on one topic from Reception to Year 6 (as outlined in the table below) with minor focuses alongside it; which will include lessons from seerah, fiqh, adab and akhlaq.

Islamic Studies Scope and Sequence from Reception to Year 6
Term 1 Term 2 Term 3 Term 4
Tawheed /Aqeedah and Salat Salat and Wudhu continued Sawm Hajj

Assessment

Assessment includes:

  • Participation in discussions, activities and classwork
  • Oral tests
  • Observation and anecdotal notes

Resources

Hassan L. & Ghazi. K. T.,Our Religion is Islam,1995, IQRA International Educational Foundation.

Saniyasnain. Quran Stories for little hearts , 2003,Goodword Kidz,

My Wudhu Book, My Prayer Book, My Dua Book; 2001, Darussalam Publishers.

Benchmarks & Recommendations

It is recommended that parents reinforce the Islamic values, morals and lessons taught at school and have discussions with their children to provide them with guidance. It is also advised that when performing Islamic duties in day to day living such as wudhu and salat, parents talk to their children about the actions they are performing and involve them too.

Year-Reception (FOUNDATION)

Overview

Reception students are introduced to Arabic Letters and numbers from 1-10 early in the year. They are then taught how to pronounce and write each Arabic letter correctly and identify simple words beginning with the letter being learned in real life. Once this understanding is established, students are taught to form simple sentences using verbs that relate to the actions they carry out in real life.

Lesson Structure

Arabic lessons typically start with the Islamic greeting, oral interactions asking the students about their day and a revision of the Arabic alphabet rhyme. Students are then introduced to a new letter, taught how to pronounce it and write it correctly and then they practice what they have learned in their text books. Letters and words that are taught are constantly reiterated through rhymes that students can remember.

Scope and Sequence

The Arabic scope and sequence in the lower years lies in familiarizing students with the Arabic names of everyday objects and actions in their daily lives, in order to allow them to use these words in the correct context.

Reception Arabic scope and sequence
Term 1 Term 2 Term 3 Term 4
Fruits & vegetables Fruits & vegetables Numbers Farm animals

Assessment

In Arabic, students are assessed anecdotally whilst actively participating in activities and through their identification and pronunciation of the Arabic letters and their ability to write and use them independently.

Resources

Arabic Resources include:

  • Arabic in Kindergarten Textbook Level Pre-K2
  • Easyword Arabic Handwriting Book 1
  • Interactive White Board
  • Posters
  • Flashcards, Games and Hands on activities

Benchmarks and Recommendations

In Reception, the emphasis lies in students becoming confident with the Arabic alphabet and the numerals from 1 to 10 as well as identifying these in context. The support of parents by motivating students and assisting them with these goals is recommended. From Term 2, students in Prep begin to complete homework for Arabic, which attempts to reinforce letter recognition and simple words at home.

Year 1

Overview

Year 1 students are introduced to Arabic Letters and numbers from 1-20 early in the year. They are then reminded and taught how to pronounce and write each Arabic letter correctly and identify simple words beginning with the letter being focused on. Once this understanding is established, students are taught to form simple sentences using verbs that relate to the actions they carry out in real life.

Lesson Structure

Arabic lessons typically start with the Islamic greeting, oral interactions asking the students about their day and a revision of the Arabic alphabet rhyme. Students are then introduced to a new letter, taught how to pronounce it and write it correctly and then they practice what they have learned in their text books. Letters and words that are taught are constantly reiterated through rhymes that students can remember.

Scope and Sequence

The Arabic scope and sequence in the lower years lies in familiarizing students with the Arabic names of everyday objects and actions in their daily lives, in order to allow them to use these words in the correct context.

Year 1 Arabic scope and sequence
Term 1 Term 2 Term 3 Term 4
Body parts My family Colours & numbers Zoo animals

Assessment

In Arabic, students are assessed anecdotally whilst actively participating in activities and through their identification and pronunciation of the Arabic letters and their ability to write and use them independently.

Resources

Arabic Resources include:

  • Arabic in Kindergarten Textbook Level Pre-K3
  • Arabic in Kindergarten Workbook Level Pre-K3
  • Interactive White Board
  • Posters, Flashcards, Games and Hands on activities

Benchmarks and Recommendations

In Year1, the emphasis lies in students becoming confident with the Arabic alphabet and the numerals from 1 to 20 as well as identifying these in context. The support of parents by motivating students and assisting them with these goals is recommended. From Term 1, students in Year1 begin to complete homework for Arabic, which attempts to reinforce letter recognition and simple words at home.

Year 2

Overview

Year 2, students are expected to be able to form simple sentences to communicate purposefully about events like the weather. Early in the year, numbers from 1-20 are revised. Students are reminded and taught how to pronounce and write each Arabic letter correctly and identify simple words beginning with the letter being focused on. Once this understanding is established, students are encouraged to use more Arabic commands and sentences during class. They also learn about long vowel and short vowel sounds.

Lesson Structure

Arabic lessons typically start with Islamic greeting, oral discussions about students’ day, the day name and the weather, followed by quick revision of the previously learnt materials. Students then use textbook I Learn Arabic Multi Languages Textbook Level 1 for reading and I learn Arabic Multi Languages Workbook Level 1 for writing activities. Students are also given the opportunity to take home small short Arabic stories to read.

Scope and Sequence

The Arabic scope and sequence in the lower years lies in familiarizing students with the Arabic names of everyday objects and actions in their daily lives, in order to allow them to use these words in the correct context.

Year 2 Arabic scope and sequence
Term 1 Term 2 Term 3 Term 4
My home My family My School My friend

Assessment

In Arabic, students are assessed anecdotally whilst actively participating in activities and through their identification and pronunciation of the Arabic letters and their ability to write and use them independently.

Resources

Arabic Resources include:

  • I Learn Arabic Textbook Level 1
  • I Learn Arabic Workbook Level 1
  • Interactive White Board
  • Posters, Flashcards, Games and Hands on activities

Benchmarks and Recommendations

By the end of Grade 2, students learning Arabic are expected to be able to, identify and read words with correct pronunciation, form and spell familiar words correctly and show neat handwriting consistently.

Year 3

Overview

In Year 3, students will build on their previous knowledge of letters to differentiate between selfish letters and learn how to join them to make more complex words /sentence in Arabic. Students learn to describe the status of the weather in one or two words. Students are encouraged to use more Arabic commands and sentences during class. They continue to learn about long and short vowels, joining letters, forming simple sentences and using simple grammar in their oral language.

Lesson Structure

Arabic lessons typically start with Islamic greeting, oral discussions about students’ day, the day name and the weather, followed by quick revision of the previously learnt materials. Students then use textbook I Learn Arabic Multi Languages Textbook Level 1 for reading and I learn Arabic Multi Languages Workbook Level 2 for writing activities. Students are also given the opportunity to take home small short Arabic stories to read.

Scope and Sequence

The Arabic scope and sequence in the lower years lies in familiarizing students with the Arabic names of everyday objects and actions in their daily lives, in order to allow them to use these words in the correct context.

Year 3 Arabic scope and sequence
Term 1 Term 2 Term 3 Term 4
Healthy Food Body Parts Daily Routine Identity

Assessment

In Arabic, students are assessed anecdotally whilst actively participating in activities and through their identification and pronunciation of the Arabic letters and their ability to write and use them independently.

Resources

Arabic Resources include:

  • Arabic in Kindergarten Textbook Level Pre-K2
  • Easyword Arabic Handwriting Book 1
  • Interactive White Board
  • Posters, Flashcards, Games and Hands on activities

Benchmarks and Recommendations

By the end of Year 3, students learning Arabic are expected to be able to, identify and read words with correct pronunciation, form joint words and letters and spell familiar words correctly and show neat handwriting consistently. Year 3 students are also given the opportunity to engage with students from suburban schools learning Arabic, through the inter-school competitions and visits.

Year 4

Overview

In Year 4, students build on their previous knowledge and there is an emphasis on forming more complex words /sentences in Arabic. Students describe the status of the weather using complex sentences.Grade4 students are encouraged to use more Arabic commands and sentences during class. They continue building their knowledge about long and short vowel sounds, joining the letters, forming simple and more complex sentences and using the correct grammar. They also begin to work on Projects.

Lesson Structure

Arabic lessons typically start with Islamic greeting, oral discussions about students’ day, the day name and the weather, followed by quick revision of the previously learnt materials. Students then use the Iqra Arabic Reader Textbook Level 2 for reading and workbook activities. Students are also given the opportunity to take home small short Arabic stories to read.

Scope and Sequence

The Arabic scope and sequence in the upper years lies in developing proficiency when forming simple and complex sentences relating to everyday experiences, in order to allow them to communicate more effectively.

Year 4 Arabic scope and sequence
Term 1 Term 2 Term 3 Term 4
Seasons Weather Transport Sport

Assessment

In Arabic, students are assessed anecdotally whilst actively participating in activities and through their identification and pronunciation of the Arabic letters and their ability to write and use them independently.

Resources

Arabic Resources include:

  • Iqra Arabic Reader Textbook Level 2
  • Iqra Arabic Reader Workbook Level 2
  • Interactive White Board
  • Posters, Flashcards, Games and Hands on activities

Benchmarks and Recommendations

By the end of Year 4, students learning Arabic are expected to be able to, identify and read words with correct pronunciation, form joint words and letters and spell familiar words correctly and show neat handwriting consistently. Year 4 students are also expected to be able to communicate projects by forming simple and some complex sentences.

Year 5

Overview

In Year 5, students build on their previous knowledge and there is an emphasis on forming more complex sentences in Arabic. Students describe the status of the weather using longer sentences. Year 5 students are encouraged to use more Arabic commands and sentences during class. They continue building their knowledge about long and short vowel sounds, joining the letters, forming simple and more complex sentences and using the correct grammar. Year 5 students are also taught how to write short paragraphs/stories in Arabic.

Lesson Structure

Arabic lessons typically start with the Islamic greeting, oral discussions about students’ day, the day name and the weather, followed by quick revision. Students use textbook I Learn Arabic Multi Languages Textbook Level 3, as well as an Arabic dictionary to broaden their vocabulary using the Al-Maurid Dictionary.

Scope and Sequence

The Arabic scope and sequence in the upper years lies in developing proficiency when forming simple and complex sentences relating to everyday experiences, in order to allow them to communicate more effectively.

Year 5 Arabic scope and sequence
Term 1 Term 2 Term 3 Term 4
Islamic Manners Cleanliness Role Models My Parents

Assessment

In Arabic, students are assessed anecdotally whilst actively participating in activities and through their identification and pronunciation of the Arabic letters and their ability to write and use them independently.

Resources

Arabic Resources include:

  • I Learn Arabic Multi Languages Textbook Level 3
  • Al-Maurid Dictionary
  • Interactive White Board
  • Posters, Flashcards, Games and Hands on activities

Benchmarks and Recommendations

By the end of Year 5, students learning Arabic are expected to be able to, read simple sentences with correct pronunciation, form sentences independently and show neat handwriting consistently. Year 5 students are also expected to be able to communicate projects using detailed sentences.

Year 6

Overview

In Year 6, students build on their previous knowledge and there is an emphasis on forming more complex sentences in Arabic. Students describe the status of the weather using longer sentences. Year 6 students are encouraged to use more Arabic commands and sentences during class. They continue building their knowledge about long and short vowel sounds, joining the letters, forming simple and more complex sentences and using the correct grammar. Year 6 students are also taught how to write short paragraphs/stories in Arabic.

Lesson Structure

Arabic lessons typically start with Islamic greeting, oral discussions about students’ day, the day name and the weather, followed by quick revision of the previously learnt materials. Students use the textbook ‘I love and Learn the Arabic Language Textbook Level 4’, as well as an Arabic dictionary to broaden their vocabulary (Al-Maurid Dictionary).

Scope and Sequence

The Arabic scope and sequence in the upper years lies in developing proficiency when forming simple and complex sentences relating to everyday experiences, in order to allow them to communicate more effectively.

Year 6 Arabic scope and sequence
Term 1 Term 2 Term 3 Term 4
Islamic Manners Friendship Hobbies Occupation

Assessment

In Arabic, students are assessed anecdotally whilst actively participating in activities and through their identification and pronunciation of the Arabic letters and their ability to write and use them independently.

Resources

Arabic Resources include:

  • I love and Learn the Arabic Language Textbook Level 4
  • Al-Maurid Dictionary
  • Interactive White Board
  • Posters, Flashcards, Games and Hands on activities

Benchmarks and Recommendations

By the end of Year 6, students learning Arabic are expected to be able to, read simple sentences with correct pronunciation, form sentences independently and show neat handwriting consistently. Year 6 students are also expected to be able to communicate projects using detailed sentences and write short recounts.

LOTE Turkish

Language is an integral part of our identity and language is the expression of our unique relationship with the land and the cultural practices that have been handed on down the generations for thousands and thousands of years. At Garden College, Turkish is taught to students with an attempt to bridge the gap between their Australian and Turkish identities. Students are taught Turkish whilst developing an understanding of Turkish tradition, culture and society.

Reception

Overview

At Garden College, the Turkish LOTE staff aims to offer students the opportunity to effectively communicate with members of other cultures in a worldwide society through an increased knowledge and understanding of the Turkish language and culture.

Lesson Structure

Reception students have 2 periods of LOTE – Turkish per week. During Turkish lessons, students hear words, phrases and basic sentences in context. Students are introduced to formal Turkish with repetitive patterns and they develop strategies for memorisation and comprehension, which are modelled and practiced with them. Students also begin to interpret gestures and facial expressions and use some of these non-verbal cues as an important part of the Turkish.

Students start to understand and use Turkish in structured situations and activities related to their life: myself, family and school. To develop comprehension, they respond non-verbally or by using key words or short phrases. They begin to use sets of words and sentences that are encountered frequently in the classroom, and begin to insert words into simple sentences. Students learn to recognise the printed form of familiar words that they have learned and memorised.

Scope and Sequence

As a part of the academic year, the activities that are organised by the LOTE Turkish department include:

  • ANZAC Commemorations
  • Multicultural Day (LOTE week)
  • Poetry Competition
  • Multicultural Children’s Festival
  • Story time
  • Writing Competition
Year Reception Turkish scope and sequence
Term 1 Term 2 Term 3 Term 4
My Self & My School Turkish Alphabet & Colours Turkish Numbers,Fruit & Vegetables Animals &Turkish Vowels

Assessment

In Turkish, students are assessed anecdotally whilst actively participating in activities. Students are also tested on their identification and pronunciation of Turkish letters and their ability to write and use them independently. Evidence of student learning is collated during and through:

  • Anecdotal notes
  • Observation of students writing and formation of letters and drawings.
  • Class participation
  • Homework

Resources

Students at Garden College are taught Turkish using the Gokkusagi series of Textbooks to complement and reinforce what is demonstrated and modelled in class. Other resources used include:

  • Interactive board
  • Work sheets
  • White Board
  • Posters
  • Flashcard
  • Story books
  • Educational games

Benchmarks and Recommendations

Students will be expected to complete Turkish homework which will attempt to allow them to recognise the “different” or “difference between” sounds of similar letters, and demonstrate differences for key sounds. Students will be given simple tasks such as identifying letter-sound relationships and copying and tracing letters and letter clusters whilst matching them to sounds and words. It is expected that parents assist and ensure that students complete their homework.

Year 1

Overview

At Garden College, the Turkish LOTE department aims to offer students the opportunity to effectively communicate with members of other cultures in a worldwide society through an increased knowledge and understanding of the Turkish language and culture.

Lesson Structure

Reception students have 2 periods and Year 1 – 6 students have 3 periods of LOTE – Turkish per week. During Turkish lessons, students hear words, phrases and basic sentences in context. Students are introduced to formal Turkish with repetitive patterns and they develop strategies for memorisation and comprehension, which are modelled and practiced with them. Students also begin to interpret gestures and facial expressions and use some of these non-verbal cues as an important part of the Turkish.

Scope and Sequence

As a part of the academic year, the activities that are organised by the LOTE Turkish department include:

  • ANZAC Commemorations
  • Multicultural Day (LOTE week)
  • Poetry and Writing Competition
  • Multicultural Children’s Festival
  • Story time
Year 1Turkish scope and sequence
Term 1 Term 2 Term 3 Term 4
My Family & My Body Body Parts Colours & Numbers Zoo Animals

Assessment

In Turkish, students are assessed anecdotally whilst actively participating in activities. Students are also tested on their identification and pronunciation of Turkish letters and their ability to write and use them independently. Evidence of student learning is collated during and through:

  • Anecdotal notes
  • Observation of students writing and formation of letters and drawings.
  • Class participation
  • Homework

Resources

Students at Garden College are taught Turkish using the Gokkusagi series of Textbooks to complement and reinforce what is demonstrated and modelled in class. Other resources used include:

  • Interactive board
  • Work sheets
  • White Board
  • Posters
  • Flashcard
  • Story books
  • Educational games

Benchmarks and Recommendations

Students will be expected to complete Turkish homework which will attempt to allow them to recognise the “different” or “difference between” sounds of similar letters, and demonstrate differences for key sounds. Students will be given simple tasks such as identifying letter-sound relationships and copying and tracing letters and letter clusters whilst matching them to sounds and words. It is expected that parents assist and ensure that students complete their homework.

Year 2

Overview

At Garden College, the Turkish LOTE department aims to offer students the opportunity to effectively communicate with members of other cultures in a worldwide society through an increased knowledge and understanding of the Turkish language and culture.

Lesson Structure

Reception students have 2 periods and Year 1 – 6 students have 3 periods of LOTE – Turkish per week. During Turkish lessons, students hear words, phrases and basic sentences in context. Students are introduced to formal Turkish with repetitive patterns and they develop strategies for memorisation and comprehension, which are modelled and practiced with them. Students also begin to interpret gestures and facial expressions and use some of these non-verbal cues as an important part of the Turkish.

Scope and Sequence

As a part of the academic year, the activities that are organised by the LOTE Turkish department include:

  • ANZAC Commemorations
  • Multicultural Day (LOTE week)
  • Poetry Competition
  • Multicultural Children’s Festival
  • Story time
  • Writing Competition
Year 2 Turkish scope and sequence
Term 1 Term 2 Term 3 Term 4
My home My family My school My friend

Assessment

In Turkish, students are assessed anecdotally whilst actively participating in activities. Students are also tested on their identification and pronunciation of Turkish letters and their ability to write and use them independently. Evidence of student learning is collated during and through:

  • Anecdotal notes
  • Observation of students writing and formation of letters and drawings.
  • Class participation
  • Homework

Resources

Students at Garden College are taught Turkish using the Gokkusagi series of Textbooks to complement and reinforce what is demonstrated and modelled in class. Other resources used include:

  • Interactive board
  • Work sheets
  • White Board
  • Posters
  • Flashcard
  • Story books
  • Educational games

Benchmarks and Recommendations

Students will be expected to complete Turkish homework which will attempt to allow them to recognise the “different” or “difference between” sounds of similar letters, and demonstrate differences for key sounds. Students will be given simple tasks such as identifying letter-sound relationships and copying and tracing letters and letter clusters whilst matching them to sounds and words. It is expected that parents assist and ensure that students complete their homework.

Year 3

Overview

At Garden College, the Turkish LOTE department aims to offer students the opportunity to effectively communicate with members of other cultures in a worldwide society through an increased knowledge and understanding of the Turkish language and culture.

Lesson Structure

Reception students have 2 periods and Year 1 – 6 students have 3 periods of LOTE – Turkish per week. During Turkish lessons, students hear words, phrases and basic sentences in context. Students are introduced to formal Turkish with repetitive patterns and they develop strategies for memorisation and comprehension, which are modelled and practiced with them. Students also begin to interpret gestures and facial expressions and use some of these non-verbal cues as an important part of the Turkish.

Scope and Sequence

As a part of the academic year, the activities that are organised by the LOTE Turkish department include:

  • ANZAC Commemorations
  • Multicultural Day (LOTE week)
  • Poetry and Writing Competition
  • Multicultural Children’s Festival
  • Story time
Year 3 Turkish scope and sequence
Term 1 Term 2 Term 3 Term 4
Healthy food Body parts Daily routine Identity(Show and tell)

Assessment

In Turkish, students are assessed anecdotally whilst actively participating in activities. Students are also tested on their identification and pronunciation of Turkish letters and their ability to write and use them independently. Evidence of student learning is collated during and through:

  • Anecdotal notes
  • Observation of students writing and formation of letters and drawings.
  • Class participation
  • Homework

Resources

Students at Garden College are taught Turkish using the Gokkusagi series of Textbooks to complement and reinforce what is demonstrated and modelled in class. Other resources used include:

  • Interactive board
  • Work sheets
  • White Board
  • Posters
  • Flashcard
  • Story books
  • Educational games

Benchmarks and Recommendations

Students will be expected to complete Turkish homework which will attempt to allow them to recognise the “different” or “difference between” sounds of similar letters, and demonstrate differences for key sounds. Students will be given simple tasks such as identifying letter-sound relationships and copying and tracing letters and letter clusters whilst matching them to sounds and words. It is expected that parents assist and ensure that students complete their homework.

Year 4

Overview

At Garden College, the Turkish LOTE department aims to offer students the opportunity to effectively communicate with members of other cultures in a worldwide society through an increased knowledge and understanding of the Turkish language and culture.

Lesson Structure

Reception students have 2 periods and Year 1 – 6 students have 3 periods of LOTE – Turkish per week. During Turkish lessons, students hear words, phrases and basic sentences in context. Students are introduced to formal Turkish with repetitive patterns and they develop strategies for memorisation and comprehension, which are modelled and practiced with them. Students also begin to interpret gestures and facial expressions and use some of these non-verbal cues as an important part of the Turkish.

Scope and Sequence

As a part of the academic year, the activities that are organised by the LOTE Turkish department include:

  • ANZAC Commemorations
  • Multicultural Day (LOTE week)
  • Poetry Competition
  • Multicultural Children’s Festival
  • Story time
  • Writing Competition
Year 4 Turkish scope and sequence
Term 1 Term 2 Term 3 Term 4
Seasons Weather Transports Sports

Assessment

In Turkish, students are assessed anecdotally whilst actively participating in activities. Students are also tested on their identification and pronunciation of Turkish letters and their ability to write and use them independently. Evidence of student learning is collated during and through:

  • Anecdotal notes
  • Observation of students writing and formation of letters and drawings.
  • Class participation
  • Homework

Resources

Students at Garden College are taught Turkish using the Gokkusagi series of Textbooks to complement and reinforce what is demonstrated and modelled in class. Other resources used include:

  • Interactive board
  • Work sheets
  • White Board
  • Posters
  • Flashcard
  • Story books
  • Educational games

Benchmarks and Recommendations

Students will be expected to complete Turkish homework which will attempt to allow them to recognise the “different” or “difference between” sounds of similar letters, and demonstrate differences for key sounds. Students will be given simple tasks such as identifying letter-sound relationships and copying and tracing letters and letter clusters whilst matching them to sounds and words. It is expected that parents assist and ensure that students complete their homework.

Year 5

Overview

At Garden College, the Turkish LOTE department aims to offer students the opportunity to effectively communicate with members of other cultures in a worldwide society through an increased knowledge and understanding of the Turkish language and culture.

Lesson Structure

Reception students have 2 periods and Year 1 – 6 students have 3 periods of LOTE – Turkish per week. During Turkish lessons, students hear words, phrases and basic sentences in context. Students are introduced to formal Turkish with repetitive patterns and they develop strategies for memorisation and comprehension, which are modelled and practiced with them. Students also begin to interpret gestures and facial expressions and use some of these non-verbal cues as an important part of the Turkish.

Scope and Sequence

As a part of the academic year, the activities that are organised by the LOTE Turkish department include:

  • ANZAC Commemorations
  • Multicultural Day (LOTE week)
  • Poetry Competition
  • Multicultural Children’s Festival
  • Story time
  • Writing Competition
Year 5 Turkish scope and sequence
Term 1 Term 2 Term 3 Term 4
Islamic Manners Cleanliness Role Models My Parents

Assessment

In Turkish, students are assessed anecdotally whilst actively participating in activities. Students are also tested on their identification and pronunciation of Turkish letters and their ability to write and use them independently. Evidence of student learning is collated during and through:

  • Anecdotal notes
  • Observation of students writing and formation of letters and drawings.
  • Class participation
  • Homework

Resources

Students at Garden College are taught Turkish using the Gokkusagi series of Textbooks to complement and reinforce what is demonstrated and modelled in class. Other resources used include:

  • Interactive board
  • Work sheets
  • White Board
  • Posters
  • Flashcard
  • Story books
  • Educational games

Benchmarks and Recommendations

Students will be expected to complete Turkish homework which will attempt to allow them to recognise the “different” or “difference between” sounds of similar letters, and demonstrate differences for key sounds. Students will be given simple tasks such as identifying letter-sound relationships and copying and tracing letters and letter clusters whilst matching them to sounds and words. It is expected that parents assist and ensure that students complete their homework.

Year 6

Overview

At Garden College, the Turkish LOTE department aims to offer students the opportunity to effectively communicate with members of other cultures in a worldwide society through an increased knowledge and understanding of the Turkish language and culture.

Lesson Structure

Reception students have 2 periods and Year 1 – 6 students have 3 periods of LOTE – Turkish per week. During Turkish lessons, students hear words, phrases and basic sentences in context. Students are introduced to formal Turkish with repetitive patterns and they develop strategies for memorisation and comprehension, which are modelled and practiced with them.

Scope and Sequence

As a part of the academic year, the activities that are organised by the LOTE Turkish department include:

  • ANZAC Commemorations
  • Multicultural Day (LOTE week)
  • Poetry& Writing Competition
  • Story time
Year 6 Turkish scope and sequence
Term 1 Term 2 Term 3 Term 4
Islamic manners Friendship Hobbies Occupation

Assessment

In Turkish, students are assessed anecdotally whilst actively participating in activities. Students are also tested on their identification and pronunciation of Turkish letters and their ability to write and use them independently. Evidence of student learning is collated during and through:

  • Anecdotal notes
  • Observation of students writing and formation of letters and drawings.
  • Class participation
  • Homework

Resources

Students at Garden College are taught Turkish using the Gokkusagi series of Textbooks to complement and reinforce what is demonstrated and modelled in class. Other resources used include:

  • Interactive board
  • Work sheets
  • White Board
  • Posters
  • Flashcard
  • Story books
  • Educational games

Benchmarks and Recommendations

Students will be expected to complete Turkish homework which will attempt to allow them to recognise the “different” or “difference between” sounds of similar letters, and demonstrate differences for key sounds. Students will be given simple tasks such as identifying letter-sound relationships and copying and tracing letters and letter clusters whilst matching them to sounds and words. It is expected that parents assist and ensure that students complete their homework.

English

YEAR-RECEPTION (FOUNDATION)

Lesson Structure

Reading and Viewing – Receptions begin the year with letter recognition work and daily exposure to various literatures. They begin reading high frequency words and basic books. Once capable, Receptions begin guided reading lessons four times a week. During these lessons students are grouped according to their reading levels. In small groups with their teacher, they are guided through a higher comprehension of the text.

Writing – Receptions are encouraged to write in some form every day. At the start of the year this will begin with the drawing of a message, scribing, tracing and progress towards writing a few sentences by the end of the year. Receptions are encouraged to spell accurately. They are given weekly spelling words and are exposed to various spelling patterns.

Speaking and Listening – Receptions develop their listening and speaking skills daily with their peers and teachers. They present at weekly show and tell sessions and provide various oral presentations. Receptions develop effective speaking skills such as using correct eye contact and appropriate gestures.

Benchmarks and Recommendations

Reading and viewing – It is recommended that Reception students practice reading their ‘THRASS hot words – level 1’ (which are high frequency words) every night. When the student is confident with reading all of the words in the set inform the teacher so that the student may be tested. Students will be allocated a reading level based on a Running Record assessment taken by the teacher. Students should read their Reader to a proficient reader every night. It is recommended that the student is asked questions about the book to help them understand what they have read. Students are tested once a term on their reading levels and given reading books accordingly, however if the reader is too difficult or too easy, the parent should inform the class teacher.

Writing – It is recommended that Receptions have regular handwriting and writing practice. Students should practice correct letter formation and size, and writing on the lines every night. It is important that students practice their spelling words and practice placing them into sentences.

Speaking and listening – It is beneficial for students to practice their oral presentations before they present them at school. Students should practice using a clear legible voice and speak coherently.

Foundation/Reception Year Achievement Standard

Receptive modes (listening, reading and viewing)

By the end of the Foundation year, students use predicting and questioning strategies to make meaning from texts. They recall one or two events from texts with familiar topics. They understand that there are different types of texts and that these can have similar characteristics. They identify connections between texts and their personal experience.

They read short, predictable texts with familiar vocabulary and supportive images, drawing on their developing knowledge of concepts about print and sound and letters. They identify the letters of the English alphabet and use the sounds represented by most letters. They listen to and use appropriate language features to respond to others in a familiar environment. They listen for rhyme, letter patterns and sounds in words.

Productive modes (speaking, writing and creating)

Students understand that their texts can reflect their own experiences. They identify and describe likes and dislikes about familiar texts, objects, characters and events.

In informal group and whole class settings, students communicate clearly. They retell events and experiences with peers and known adults. They identify and use rhyme, letter patterns and sounds in words. When writing, students use familiar words and phrases and images to convey ideas. Their writing shows evidence of sound and letter knowledge, beginning writing behaviours and experimentation with capital letters and full stops. They correctly form known upper- and lower-case letters.

YEAR 1

Lesson Structure

Reading & Viewing–Students participate in guided reading lessons four times a week. During these lessons students mix with the other year 1 classes, and are grouped according to their reading levels. In small groups, with the aid of the teacher, students are taught reading strategies to help develop their comprehension. These strategies are further reinforced with other activities.

Year 1 students practice reading their ‘THRASS hot words – level 2’ (high frequency words) daily. After lunch students participate in daily silent reading. During this time the teacher may choose to listen to children read individually, and provide feedback about their reading.

Writing – Students participate in daily writing activities and continue improving their basic sentence structure. They begin using capital letters and full stops in their writing. They begin implementing simple editing skills such as rereading their written work and finding ways to improve their writing. They are gradually introduced to various genres such as recount and procedure. They are exposed to the structure of these genres and the language features associated with the genres. Weekly handwriting sessions help in improving handwriting.

Speaking and Listening – Our Year 1 students develop their speaking skills daily with their peers and teachers. They present at weekly show-and-tell sessions and provide various oral presentations. They learn about the importance of facial expressions and gestures while presenting. They participate in discussions and listen effectively to others presenting.

Benchmarks and Recommendations

Reading and Viewing – It is recommended that Year 1s practice reading their ‘THRASS hot words – level 2’ (high frequency words) nightly. They should revise the Reception ‘THRASS hot words – level 1’ words also. When the child is confident reading all of the words in the Year 1 set, the teacher should be informed for testing to occur. Students will be allocated a reading level based on a Running Record assessment taken by the teacher. Students should read their reader to a proficient reader every night and be asked comprehension questions about the book. Students are tested once a term on their reading levels, however if the reader is too difficult or easy, the parent should inform the class teacher.

Writing – It is recommended that Year 1 students regularly practice handwriting and writing. Students should practice correct letter formation and size, and writing on the lines every night. It is important that students practice their spelling words and place them into sentences. The correct spelling of high frequency words should be practiced and emphasised.

Speaking and listening – It is beneficial for students to practice their oral presentations before they present them at school. Students should practice using a clear legible voice and speaking coherently. Students should be encouraged to provide detail and use adjectives in their speeches.

Year 1 Achievement Standard

Receptive modes (listening, reading and viewing)

By the end of Year 1, students understand the different purposes of texts. They make connections to personal experience when explaining characters and main events in short texts. They identify the language features, images and vocabulary used to describe characters and events.

Students read aloud, with developing fluency and intonation, short texts with some unfamiliar vocabulary, simple and compound sentences and supportive images. When reading, they use knowledge of sounds and letters, high frequency words, sentence boundary punctuation and directionality to make meaning. They recall key ideas and recognise literal and implied meaning in texts. They listen to others when taking part in conversations, using appropriate language features. They listen for and reproduce letter patterns and letter clusters.

Productive modes (speaking, writing and creating)

Students understand how characters in texts are developed and give reasons for personal preferences. They create texts that show understanding of the connection between writing, speech and images.

They create short texts for a small range of purposes. They interact in pair, group and class discussions, taking turns when responding. They make short presentations of a few connected sentences on familiar and learned topics. When writing, students provide details about ideas or events. They accurately spell words with regular spelling patterns and use capital letters and full stops. They correctly form all upper- and lower-case letters.

YEAR 2

Lesson Structure

Reading and Viewing –Our Year 2 students participate in guided reading lessons four times a week. During these lessons students mix with the other Year 2 classes, and are grouped according to their reading levels. In small groups, with the aid of the teacher, students are taught reading strategies to help develop their comprehension. These strategies are further reinforced with other activities.

Year 2 students practice reading their ‘THRASS hot words – level 3’ (high frequency words) daily. After lunch students participate in daily silent reading. During this time the teacher may choose to listen to children read individually, and provide feedback about their reading.

Writing – Year 2 students participate in daily writing activities and continue improving and enhancing their sentences. They accurately use the correct punctuation in their writing. They reread and begin to edit their written work to improve their spelling and sentence structure. They are introduced to various forms of genres such as exposition and reports. They are taught the structure of these genres and the language features associated with the genre. They continue improving their handwriting and have weekly handwriting lessons.

Speaking and Listening – Our Year 2 students enhance their speaking skills daily with their peers, teachers and the community. They are taught how to adapt their speeches based on which audience it will be directed to. They present at weekly show and tell sessions and provide various oral presentations. They participate in discussions and listen effectively to others presenting.

Benchmarks and Recommendations

Reading and viewing – It is recommended that Year 2 students practice reading their ‘THRASS hot words – level 3’ (high frequency words) nightly. They should revise the Reception and Year 1 ‘THRASS hot words – level 1 and 2’ words also. When the child is confident reading all of the words in the Year 2 set, the teacher should be informed for testing to occur. Students will be allocated a reading level based on a Running Record assessment taken by the teacher. Students should read their reader to a proficient reader every night and asked comprehension questions about the book. Students are tested once a term on their reading levels, however if the reader is too difficult or easy, the parent should inform the class teacher.

Writing – It is recommended that Year 2 students have regular practice handwriting and writing. Students should practice correct letter formation and size, and writing on the lines every night. It is important that students practice their spelling words and place them into sentences. The correct spelling of high frequency words should be practiced and emphasised.

Speaking and listening – It is beneficial for students to practice their oral presentations before they present them at school. Students should practice using a clear legible voice and speaking coherently. Students should be encouraged to provide detail and use adjectives in their speeches.

Year 2 Achievement Standard

Receptive modes (listening, reading and viewing)

By the end of Year 2, students understand how similar texts share characteristics by identifying text structures and language features used to describe characters, settings and events.

They read texts that contain varied sentence structures, some unfamiliar vocabulary, a significant number of high frequency sight words and images that provide additional information. They monitor meaning and self-correct using context, prior knowledge, punctuation, language and phonic knowledge. They identify literal and implied meaning, main ideas and supporting detail. Students make connections between texts by comparing content. They listen for particular purposes. They listen for and manipulate sound combinations and rhythmic sound patterns.

Productive modes (speaking, writing and creating)

When discussing their ideas and experiences, students use everyday language features and topic-specific vocabulary. They explain their preferences for aspects of texts using other texts as comparisons. They create texts that show how images support the meaning of the text.

Students create texts, drawing on their own experiences, their imagination and information they have learned. They use a variety of strategies to engage in group and class discussions and make presentations. They accurately spell familiar words and attempt to spell less familiar words and use punctuation accurately. They legibly write unjoined upper- and lower-case letters.

YEAR 3

The English curriculum is built around the three interrelated strands of Language, Literature and Literacy. Teaching and learning programs should balance and integrate all three strands. The focus is on developing students’ knowledge, understanding and skills in listening, reading, viewing, speaking, writing and creating.

Overview

In English, students explore a range of texts with different text structures, depending on purpose and audience. They learn how language features, images and vocabulary help to engage the interest of audiences. They then use appropriate language features, images and vocabulary to create structured texts that suit the purpose and audience. They also learn to describe literal and implied meaning using different reading strategies to connect ideas in different texts. They explain their preferences for particular texts and respond to other’s viewpoints. The range of literary texts comprises Australian literature, including the oral narrative traditions and contemporary literature of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples, and the classic and contemporary world literature, including texts from and about Asia. They make presentations and contribute actively to class and group discussions. They listen for significant points in discussions.

Lesson Structure

Reading and Viewing–Our Year 3 students participate in guided reading lessons four times a week. During these lessons students mix with the other Year 3 classes, and are grouped according to their reading levels. In small groups, with the aid of the teacher, students are taught reading strategies to help develop their comprehension. These strategies are further reinforced with other activities.

After lunch students participate in daily silent reading. During this time the teacher may choose to listen to children read individually, and provide feedback about their reading.

Writing – Our Year 3 students participate in daily writing activities and continue improving and enhancing their writing. They begin using paragraphs and edit their work for correct meaning, structure and spelling. They are introduced to various forms of genres such as exposition, reports and narratives. They are taught the structure of these genres and the language features associated with the genre. They are introduced to joined handwriting.

Speaking and Listening – Year 3 students communicate with their peers, teachers, the community and various schools via online or virtual environments. They are taught the various social conventions of speaking such as taking turns and how to address people. They present at weekly show-and-tell sessions and provide various oral presentations. They participate in discussions and listen effectively to others presenting.

Scope and Sequences

Garden College has an established genre scope and sequence which is followed when teaching English. Elements of Language, Literature and Literacy from the table below are integrated and taught through the genre focused on, throughout each unit.

Language  Literature Literacy
Language variation and change Literature and context Texts in context
Language for interaction Responding to literature Interacting with others
Text structure and organisation Examining literature Interpreting, analysing and evaluating
Expressing and developing ideas Creating literature Creating texts
Sound and letter knowledge

Content descriptors are online and will inform teacher’s programming

www.australiancurriculum.edu.au/English/Content-structure

Assessment

Assessment includes:

  • NAPLAN
  • Informal and formal running records
  • Ongoing checklists
  • Observations and Anecdotal notes
  • Portfolio, diaries, learning logs
  • Rubrics to assess skills and content
  • Comprehensive Assessment of Reading Strategies (CARS)

Resources

English Resources referenced regularly include:

  • THRASS handwriting booklet
  • 100 THRASS hot words flash cards
  • Running Records Benchmark Kit
  • IWB Flipchart on Garden Server
  • Word Up Spelling Book 3

Benchmarks and Recommendations

Reading and viewing – Year 3 students should continue reading the ‘THRASS hot words – levels 1- 3’ (high frequency words) regularly to ensure fluency. Students will be allocated a reading level based on a Running Record assessment taken by the teacher. Students should read their reader to a proficient reader every night and asked comprehension questions about the book. They are tested once a term on their reading levels, however if the reader is too difficult or easy, the parent should inform the class teacher.

Writing – It is recommended that Year 3 students regularly practice handwriting and writing at home. Students should practice correct letter formation, size, and writing on the lines using the joined handwriting. It is important that students practice their spelling words and place them into sentences. The correct spelling of high frequency words should be practiced and emphasised.

Speaking and listening – It is beneficial for students to practice their oral presentations before they present them at school. Students should practice using a clear legible voice and speaking coherently. Students should be encouraged to provide detail and use adjectives in their speeches.

Year 3 Achievement Standard

Receptive modes (listening, reading and viewing)

By the end of Year 3, students understand how content can be organised using different text structures depending on the purpose of the text. They understand how language features, images and vocabulary choices are used for different effects.

They read texts that contain varied sentence structures, a range of punctuation conventions, and images that provide additional information. They identify literal and implied meaning connecting ideas in different parts of a text. They select information, ideas and events in texts that relate to their own lives and to other texts. They listen to others’ views and respond appropriately.

Productive modes (speaking, writing and creating)

Students understand how language features are used to link and sequence ideas. They understand how language can be used to express feelings and opinions on topics. Their texts include writing and images to express and develop in some detail experiences, events, information, ideas and characters.

Students create a range of texts for familiar and unfamiliar audiences. They contribute actively to class and group discussions, asking questions, providing useful feedback and making presentations. They demonstrate understanding of grammar and choose vocabulary and punctuation appropriate to the purpose and context of their writing. They use knowledge of sounds and high frequency words to spell words accurately, checking their work for meaning. They write using joined letters that are accurately formed and consistent in size.

YEAR 4

The English curriculum is built around the three interrelated strands of Language, Literature and Literacy. Teaching and learning programs should balance and integrate all three strands. The focus is on developing students’ knowledge, understanding and skills in listening, reading, viewing, speaking, writing and creating.

Overview

In English, students explore a range of texts with different text structures, depending on purpose and audience. They learn how language features, images and vocabulary help to engage the interest of audiences. They then use appropriate language features, images and vocabulary to create structured texts that suit the purpose and audience. They also learn to describe literal and implied meaning using different reading strategies to connect ideas in different texts. They explain their preferences for particular texts and respond to other’s viewpoints. The range of literary texts comprises Australian literature, including the oral narrative traditions and contemporary literature of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples, and the classic and contemporary world literature, including texts from and about Asia. They make presentations and contribute actively to class and group discussions. They listen for significant points in discussions.

Lesson Structure

In Year 4, students actively participate in Shared Reading Sessions as well as Reciprocal/Guided Reading Sessions. These sessions usually take place in the morning and include reading and writing. When students are doing guided reading, they are exposed to reading cues, word study and grammar skills. Reading strategies are taught explicitly through the CARS and STARS program and the implementation of reciprocal reading teaches students to use reading comprehension strategies independently. These strategies include text prediction, summarisation, question generation and clarification of unknown or unclear content. During writing sessions students practice handwriting and are also exposed to different text types such as narrative, recount, explanation and procedure throughout the year.

Scope and Sequences

Garden College has an established genre scope and sequence which is followed when teaching English. Elements of Language, Literature and Literacy from the table below are integrated and taught through the genre focused on, throughout each unit.

Language Literature Literacy 
Language variation and change Literature and context Texts in context
Language for interaction Responding to literature Interacting with others
Text structure and organisation Examining literature Interpreting, analysing and evaluating
Expressing and developing ideas Creating literature Creating texts
Sound and letter knowledge

Content descriptors are online and will inform teacher’s programming

www.australiancurriculum.edu.au/English/Content-structure

Assessment

Assessment includes:

  • PROBE Comprehension assessments
  • Ongoing checklists
  • Observations and Anecdotal notes
  • Portfolio
  • Rubrics to assess skills and content
  • Comprehensive Assessment of Reading Strategies (CARS)

Resources

English Resources referenced regularly include:

  • CARS and STARS
  • Grammar through text types
  • English for a Purpose
  • IWB Flipchart on Garden Server
  • Word Up Spelling Book 4

Benchmarks and Recommendations

Writing – In Year 4, students are expected to write two examples of a genre each term, with one of the work samples integrated into their Inquiry topic.

Spelling – Students are expected to learn the spelling patterns of up to 15 words each week and are expected to be able to demonstrate correct spelling of all common words in their writing.

Reading – Students are expected to be able to read a variety of texts independently in Year 4.

Year 4 Achievement Standard

Receptive modes (listening, reading and viewing)

By the end of Year 4, students understand that texts have different text structures depending on purpose and audience. They explain how language features, images and vocabulary are used to engage the interest of audiences.

They describe literal and implied meaning connecting ideas in different texts. They express preferences for particular texts, and respond to others’ viewpoints. They listen for key points in discussions.

Productive modes (speaking, writing and creating)

Students use language features to create coherence and add detail to their texts. They understand how to express an opinion based on information in a text. They create texts that show understanding of how images and detail can be used to extend key ideas.

Students create structured texts to explain ideas for different audiences. They make presentations and contribute actively to class and group discussions, varying language according to context. They demonstrate understanding of grammar, select vocabulary from a range of resources and use accurate spelling and punctuation, editing their work to improve meaning.

YEAR 5

The English curriculum is built around the three interrelated strands of Language, Literature and Literacy. Teaching and learning programs should balance and integrate all three strands. The focus is on developing students’ knowledge, understanding and skills in listening, reading, viewing, speaking, writing and creating.

Overview

In English, students explore a range of texts with different text structures, depending on purpose and audience. They learn how language features, images and vocabulary help to engage the interest of audiences. They then use appropriate language features, images and vocabulary to create structured texts that suit the purpose and audience. They also learn to describe literal and implied meaning using different reading strategies to connect ideas in different texts. They explain their preferences for particular texts and respond to other’s viewpoints. The range of literary texts comprises Australian literature, including the oral narrative traditions and contemporary literature of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples, and the classic and contemporary world literature, including texts from and about Asia. They make presentations and contribute actively to class and group discussions. They listen for significant points in discussions.

Lesson Structure

In Year 5, students actively participate in Shared Reading Sessions as well as Reciprocal/Guided Reading Sessions. These sessions usually take place in the morning and include reading and writing. When students are doing guided reading, they are exposed to reading cues, word study and grammar skills. Reading strategies are taught explicitly through the CARS and STARS program and the implementation of reciprocal reading teaches students to use reading comprehension strategies independently. These strategies include text prediction, summarisation, question generation and clarification of unknown or unclear content. During writing sessions students practice handwriting and are also exposed to different text types such as narrative, recount, explanation, persuasive and procedure throughout the year.

Scope and Sequences

Garden College has an established genre scope and sequence which is followed when teaching English. Elements of Language, Literature and Literacy from the table below are integrated and taught through the genre focused on, throughout each unit.

Language Literature Literacy 
Language variation and change Literature and context Texts in context
Language for interaction Responding to literature Interacting with others
Text structure and organisation Examining literature Interpreting, analysing and evaluating
Expressing and developing ideas Creating literature Creating texts
Sound and letter knowledge

Content descriptors are online and will inform teacher’s programming

www.australiancurriculum.edu.au/English/Content-structure

Assessment

Assessment includes:

  • NAPLAN
  • PROBE Comprehension assessments
  • Ongoing checklists
  • Observations and Anecdotal notes
  • Portfolio
  • Rubrics to assess skills and content
  • Comprehensive Assessment of Reading Strategies (CARS)

Resources

English Resources referenced regularly include:

  • CARS and STARS
  • Australian Curriculum aligned resources from Professional Development sessions and online sources
  • IWB Flipchart on the Garden Server
  • Word Up Spelling Book 5

Benchmarks and Recommendations

Writing – In Year 5, students are expected to write two examples of a genre each term, with one of the work samples integrated into their Inquiry topic.

Spelling – Students are expected to learn the spelling patterns of up to 15 words each week and are expected to be able to demonstrate correct spelling of all common words and some complex words in their writing.

Reading –The expected reading level at the end of grade 3 is level 30 +, which assumes independent reading across a variety of texts.

Year 5 Achievement Standard

Receptive modes (listening, reading and viewing)

By the end of Year 5, students explain how text structures assist in understanding the text. They understand how language features, images and vocabulary influence interpretations of characters, settings and events.

They analyse and explain literal and implied information from a variety of texts. They describe how events, characters and settings in texts are depicted and explain their own responses to them. They listen and ask questions to clarify content.

Productive modes (speaking, writing and creating)

Students use language features to show how ideas can be extended. They develop and explain a point of view about a text, selecting information, ideas and images from a range of resources.

Students create a variety of sequenced texts for different purposes and audiences. They make presentations and contribute actively to class and group discussions, taking into account other perspectives. When writing, they demonstrate understanding of grammar, select specific vocabulary and use accurate spelling and punctuation, editing their work to provide structure and meaning.

YEAR 6

The English curriculum is built around the three interrelated strands of Language, Literature and Literacy. Teaching and learning programs should balance and integrate all three strands. The focus is on developing students’ knowledge, understanding and skills in listening, reading, viewing, speaking, writing and creating.

Overview

In English, students explore a range of texts with different text structures, depending on purpose and audience. They learn how language features, images and vocabulary help to engage the interest of audiences. They then use appropriate language features, images and vocabulary to create structured texts that suit the purpose and audience. They also learn to describe literal and implied meaning using different reading strategies to connect ideas in different texts. They explain their preferences for particular texts and respond to other’s viewpoints. The range of literary texts comprises Australian literature, including the oral narrative traditions and contemporary literature of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples, and the classic and contemporary world literature, including texts from and about Asia. They make presentations and contribute actively to class and group discussions. They listen for significant points in discussions.

Lesson Structure

In Year 6, students actively participate in Shared Reading Sessions as well as Reciprocal/Guided Reading Sessions. These sessions usually take place in the morning and include reading and writing. When students are doing guided reading, they are exposed to reading cues, word study and grammar skills. Reading strategies are taught explicitly through the CARS and STARS program and the implementation of reciprocal reading teaches students to use reading comprehension strategies independently. These strategies include text prediction, summarisation, question generation and clarification of unknown or unclear content. During writing sessions students practice handwriting and are also exposed to different text types such as narrative, recount, explanation and procedure throughout the year.

Word study and grammar skills will be focused on a weekly basis and students will focus on weekly spelling words which are used during mathematics classes and science classes. During grammar classes, students become very familiar with various nouns, adjectives, verbs, adverbs, clauses and other language features relevant to the texts they are learning about.

Students are exposed to two novels (Island or the Blue Dolphin and Two Hands Together) throughout the year, which are read as a whole class and followed through with activities. This explicit reading allows students to ask questions promptly on aspects of the chapter they haven’t understood and consolidates their comprehension and vocabulary skills.

Scope and Sequences

Garden College has an established genre scope and sequence which is followed when teaching English. Elements of Language, Literature and Literacy from the table below are integrated and taught through the genre focused on, throughout each unit.

Language Literature Literacy 
Language variation and change Literature and context Texts in context
Language for interaction Responding to literature Interacting with others
Text structure and organisation Examining literature Interpreting, analysing and evaluating
Expressing and developing ideas Creating literature Creating texts
Sound and letter knowledge

Content descriptors are online and will inform teacher’s programming

www.australiancurriculum.edu.au/English/Content-structure

Assessment

Assessment includes:

  • PROBE Comprehension assessments
  • Ongoing checklists
  • Observations and Anecdotal notes
  • Portfolio
  • Rubrics to assess skills and content
  • Comprehensive Assessment of Reading Strategies (CARS)

Resources

English Resources referenced regularly include:

  • CARS and STARS
  • Grammar through text types
  • English for a Purpose
  • IWB Flipchart on Garden Server
  • Word Up Spelling Book 6

Benchmarks and Recommendations

Writing – In Year 6, students are expected to write two examples of a genre each term, with one of the work samples integrated into their Inquiry topic.

Spelling – Students are expected to learn the spelling patterns of up to 15 words each week and are expected to be able to demonstrate correct spelling of all common words and some complex words in their writing.

Reading – Students are expected to be reading novels independently in year 6.

Year 6 Achievement Standard

Receptive modes (listening, reading and viewing)

By the end of Year 6, students understand how the use of text structures can achieve particular effects. They analyse and explain how language features, images and vocabulary are used by different authors to represent ideas, characters and events.

Students compare and analyse information in different texts, explaining literal and implied meaning. They select and use evidence from a text to explain their response to it. They listen to discussions, clarifying content and challenging others’ ideas.

Productive modes (speaking, writing and creating)

Students understand how language features and language patterns can be used for emphasis. They show how specific details can be used to support a point of view. They explain how their choices of language features and images are used.

Students create detailed texts elaborating on key ideas for a range of purposes and audiences. They make presentations and contribute actively to class and group discussions, using a variety of strategies for effect. They demonstrate understanding of grammar, make considered choices from an expanding vocabulary, use accurate spelling and punctuation for clarity and make and explain editorial choices.

Maths

YEAR-Reception (FOUNDATION)

Mathematics at Garden College provides students with essential mathematical skills and knowledge in Number and Algebra, Measurement and Geometry, and Statistics and Probability. It develops the numeracy capabilities that all students need in their personal, work and civic life, and provides the fundamentals on which mathematical specialties and professional applications of mathematics are built.

Overview

The Mathematics curriculum at Garden College aims to ensure that all students benefit from access to the power of mathematical reasoning and learn to apply mathematical understandings creatively and efficiently. Skills are developed through a range of open ended and interactive activities using concrete materials. This includes games, hands on activities, formal procedures and problem solving tasks. Lower Primary classes use the ‘Early Years Numeracy Program’ in which each individual student’s strengths and weaknesses are assessed and built upon. All areas of Mathematics are covered each term, throughout the year.

Lesson Structure

During Mathematics sessions, the classroom is set up with enough floor space to allow interactive and engaging tuning in sessions to introduce new topics. The tables are set up in groups to allow flexibility to work both individually and in mixed ability groups, depending on what is required for that lesson. In a typical lesson, students are introduced to the Mathematical concept, actively take part in an opening activity are exposed to focus words for that concept and complete an individual or group task to consolidate the Mathematical skills and understanding relevant to that lesson.

Assessment

Assessment includes:

  • Teacher observations – ongoing
  • Anecdotal notes – ongoing
  • Topical Tests and the Early Years Numeracy Test – 1st and 3rd Term

Resources

Mathematics resources referenced regularly include:

  • iMaths
  • Interactive Australian Curriculum aligned websites such as Scootle and Studyladder

Benchmarks and Recommendations

Numeracy Week is a celebration of our mathematical skills in the real world. Each year, different activities are planned for different year levels and are often tied in with current affairs, such as the Olympics. This provides an enjoyable and valuable learning foundation for the whole school community. To ensure that students develop Mathematics concepts with confidence, the following skills are taught and emphasized very early in the year:

  • Counting from 1-20 verbally and recognising and writing 1-10
  • Recognising shapes & colours
  • Identifying Heavy/light/long/short
  • Adding and subtracting a collection of simple objects
  • Using position language to identify location

Foundation/Reception Year Achievement Standard

By the end of the Foundation year, students make connections between number names, numerals and quantities up to 10. They compare objects using mass, length and capacity. Students connect events and the days of the week. They explain the order and duration of events. They use appropriate language to describe location.

Students count to and from 20 and order small collections. They group objects based on common characteristics and sort shapes and objects. Students answer simple questions to collect information.

Australian Curriculum Achievement Levels

Year 1

The Mathematics curriculum at Garden College aims to ensure that all students benefit from access to the power of mathematical reasoning and learn to apply mathematical understandings creatively and efficiently. Skills are developed through a range of open ended and interactive activities using concrete materials. This includes games, hands on activities, formal procedures and problem solving tasks. Lower Primary classes use the ‘Early Years Numeracy Program’ in which each individual student’s strengths and weaknesses are assessed and built upon.

Lesson Structure

During Mathematics sessions, the classroom is set up with enough floor space to allow interactive and engaging tuning in sessions to introduce new topics. The tables are set up in groups to allow flexibility to work both individually and in mixed ability groups, depending on what is required for that lesson. In a typical lesson, students are introduced to the Mathematical concept, actively take part in an opening activity are exposed to focus words for that concept and complete an individual or group task to consolidate the Mathematical skills and understanding relevant to that lesson.

Scope and Sequences

In year 1, there is a focus on developing the following abilities throughout the year:

Understanding Fluency Problem Solving Reasoning
includes connecting names, numerals and quantities, and partitioning numbers in various ways Includes counting numbers in sequences readily forward and backwards, locating numbers on a line, and naming the days of the week includes using materials to model authentic problems, giving and receiving directions to unfamiliar places, and using familiar counting sequences to solve unfamiliar problems and discussing the reasonableness of the answer includes explaining direct and indirect comparisons of length using uniform informal units, justifying representations of data, and explaining patterns that have been created

Assessment

Assessment includes:

  • Teacher observations – ongoing
  • Anecdotal notes – ongoing
  • Topical Tests and the Early Years Numeracy Test – 1st and 3rd Term

Resources

Mathematics resources referenced regularly include:

  • iMaths
  • Interactive Australian Curriculum aligned websites such as Scootle and Studyladder

Benchmarks and Recommendations

By the end of Year 1, it is recommended that students describe number sequences resulting from skip counting by 2s, 5s and 10s. They identify representations of one half. They recognise Australian coins according to their value. Students explain time durations. They describe two-dimensional shapes and three-dimensional objects. Students describe data displays.

 

Students count to and from 100 and locate numbers on a number line. They carry out simple additions and subtractions using counting strategies. They partition numbers using place value. They continue simple patterns involving numbers and objects. Students order objects based on lengths and capacities using informal units. They tell time to the half hour. They use the language of direction to move from place to place. Students classify outcomes of simple familiar events. They collect data by asking questions and draw simple data displays.

Year 1 Achievement Standard

By the end of Year 1, students describe number sequences resulting from skip counting by 2s, 5s and 10s. They identifyrepresentations of one half. They recognise Australian coins according to their value. Students explain time durations. They describe two-dimensional shapes and three-dimensional objects. Students describe data displays.

Students count to and from 100 and locate numbers on a number line. They carry out simple additions and subtractions using counting strategies. They partition numbers using place value. They continue simple patterns involving numbers and objects. Students order objects based on lengths and capacities using informal units. They tell time to the half hour. They use the language of direction to move from place to place. Students classify outcomes of simple familiar events. They collect data by asking questions and draw simple data displays.

Year 2

Mathematics at Garden College provides students with essential mathematical skills and knowledge in Number and AlgebraMeasurement and Geometry, and Statistics and Probability. It develops the numeracy capabilities that all students need in their personal, work and civic life, and provides the fundamentals on which mathematical specialties and professional applications of mathematics are built.

Overview

The Mathematics curriculum at Garden College aims to ensure that all students benefit from access to the power of mathematical reasoning and learn to apply mathematical understandings creatively and efficiently. Skills are developed through a range of open ended and interactive activities using concrete materials. This includes games, hands on activities, formal procedures and problem solving tasks. Lower Primary classes use the ‘Early Years Numeracy Program’ in which each individual student’s strengths and weaknesses are assessed and built upon.

Lesson Structure

During Mathematics sessions, the classroom is set up with enough floor space to allow interactive and engaging tuning in sessions to introduce new topics. The tables are set up in groups to allow flexibility to work both individually and in mixed ability groups, depending on what is required for that lesson. In a typical lesson, students are introduced to the Mathematical concept, actively take part in an opening activity are exposed to focus words for that concept and complete an individual or group task to consolidate the Mathematical skills and understanding relevant to that lesson.

Scope and Sequences

In Year 2, there is a focus on developing the following abilities throughout the year:

Understanding Fluency Problem Solving Reasoning
includes connecting number calculations with counting sequences, partitioning and combining numbers flexibly, identifying and describing the relationship between addition and subtraction and between multiplication and division includes counting numbers in sequences readily, using informal units iteratively to compare measurements, using the language of chance to describe outcomes of familiar chance events and describing and comparing time durations includes formulating problems from authentic situations, making models and using number sentences that represent problem situations, and matching transformations with their original shape includes using known facts to derive strategies for unfamiliar calculations, comparing and contrasting related models of operations, and creating and interpreting simple representations of data

Assessment

Assessment includes:

  • Teacher observations – ongoing
  • Anecdotal notes – ongoing
  • Topical Tests and the Early Years Numeracy Test – 1st and 3rd Term

Resources

Mathematics resources referenced regularly include:

  • iMaths
  • Interactive Australian Curriculum aligned websites such as Scootle and Studyladder

Benchmarks and Recommendations

By the end of Year 2, it is recommended that students recognise increasing and decreasing number sequences involving 2s, 3s and 5s. They represent multiplication and division by grouping into sets. They associate collections of Australian coins with their value. Students identify the missing element in a number sequence. Students recognise the features of three-dimensional objects. They interpret simple maps of familiar locations. They explain the effects of one-step transformations. Students make sense of collected information.

Students count to and from 1000. They perform simple addition and subtraction calculations using a range of strategies. They divide collections and shapes into halves, quarters and eighths. Students order shapes and objects using informal units. They tell time to the quarter hour and use a calendar to identify the date and the months included in seasons. They draw two- dimensional shapes. They describe outcomes for everyday events. Students collect data from relevant questions to create lists, tables and picture graphs.

Year 2 Achievement Standard

By the end of Year 2, students recognise increasing and decreasing number sequences involving 2s, 3s and 5s. They represent multiplication and division by grouping into sets. They associate collections of Australian coins with their value. Students identify the missing element in a number sequence. Students recognise the features of three-dimensional objects. They interpret simple maps of familiar locations. They explain the effects of one-step transformations. Students make sense of collected information.

Students count to and from 1000. They perform simple addition and subtraction calculations using a range of strategies. They divide collections and shapes into halves, quarters and eighths. Students order shapes and objects using informal units. They tell time to the quarter hour and use a calendar to identify the date and the months included in seasons. They draw two- dimensional shapes. They describe outcomes for everyday events. Students collect data from relevant questions to create lists, tables and picture graphs.

Year 3

Overview

The Mathematics curriculum at Garden College aims to ensure that all students benefit from access to the power of mathematical reasoning and learn to apply mathematical understandings creatively and efficiently. Skills are developed through a range of open ended and interactive activities using concrete materials. This includes games, hands on activities, formal procedures and problem solving tasks. Lower Primary classes use the ‘Early Years Numeracy Program’ in which each individual student’s strengths and weaknesses are assessed and built upon.

Lesson Structure

During Mathematics sessions, the classroom is set up with enough floor space to allow interactive and engaging tuning in sessions to introduce new topics. The tables are set up in groups to allow flexibility to work both individually and in mixed ability groups, depending on what is required for that lesson. In a typical lesson, students are introduced to the Mathematical concept, actively take part in an opening activity are exposed to focus words for that concept and complete an individual or group task to consolidate the Mathematical skills and understanding relevant to that lesson.

Scope and Sequences

In Year 3, there is a focus on developing the following abilities throughout the year:

Understanding Fluency Problem Solving Reasoning
includes connecting number representations with number sequences, partitioning and combining numbers flexibly, representing unit fractions, using appropriate language to communicate times, and identifying environmental symmetry includes recalling multiplication facts, using familiar metric units to order and compare objects, identifying and describing outcomes of chance experiments, interpreting maps and communicating positions includes formulating and modelling authentic situations involving planning methods of data collection and representation, making models of three-dimensional objects and using number properties to continue number patterns includes using generalising from number properties and results of calculations, comparing angles, creating and interpreting variations in the results of data collections and data displays

Assessment

Assessment includes:

  • NAPLAN
  • Teacher observations – ongoing
  • Anecdotal notes – ongoing
  • Topical Tests and Nelson Numeracy Assessments

Resources

Mathematics resources referenced regularly include:

  • iMaths
  • Interactive Australian Curriculum aligned websites such as Scootle and Studyladder

Benchmarks and Recommendations

By the end of Year 3, students recognise the connection between addition and subtraction and solve problems using efficient strategies for multiplication. They model and represent unit fractions. They represent money values in various ways. Students identify symmetry in the environment. They match positions on maps with given information. Students recognise angles in real situations. They interpret and compare data displays.

Students count to and from 10 000. They classify numbers as either odd or even. They recall addition and multiplication facts for single digit numbers. Students correctly count out change from financial transactions. They continue number patterns involving addition and subtraction. Students use metric units for length, mass and capacity. They tell time to the nearest minute. Students make models of three-dimensional objects. Students conduct chance experiments and list possible outcomes. They carry out simple data investigations for categorical

Year 3 Achievement Standard

By the end of Year 3, students recognise the connection between addition and subtraction and solve problems using efficient strategies for multiplication. They model and represent unit fractions. They represent money values in various ways. Students identify symmetry in the environment. They match positions on maps with given information. Students recognise angles in real situations. They interpret and compare data displays.

Students count to and from 10 000. They classify numbers as either odd or even. They recall addition and multiplication facts for single digit numbers. Students correctly count out change from financial transactions. They continue number patterns involving addition and subtraction. Students use metric units for length, mass and capacity. They tell time to the nearest minute. Students make models of three-dimensional objects. Students conduct chance experiments and list possible outcomes. They carry out simple data investigations for categorical variables.

Year 4

Overview

The Mathematics curriculum at Garden College aims to ensure that all students benefit from access to the power of mathematical reasoning and learn to apply mathematical understandings creatively and efficiently. Skills are developed through a range of open ended and interactive activities using concrete materials. This includes games, hands on activities, formal procedures and problem solving tasks. Lower Primary classes use the ‘Early Years Numeracy Program’ in which each individual student’s strengths and weaknesses are assessed and built upon.

Lesson Structure

During Mathematics sessions, the classroom is set up with enough floor space to allow interactive and engaging tuning in sessions to introduce new topics. The tables are set up in groups to allow flexibility to work both individually and in mixed ability groups, depending on what is required for that lesson. In a typical lesson, students are introduced to the Mathematical concept, actively take part in an opening activity are exposed to focus words for that concept and complete an individual or group task to consolidate the Mathematical skills and understanding relevant to that lesson.

Scope and Sequences

In year 4, there is a focus on developing the following abilities throughout the year:

Understanding Fluency Problem Solving Reasoning
includes making connections between representations of numbers, partitioning and combining numbers flexibly, extending place value to decimals, using appropriate language to communicate times, and describing properties of symmetrical shapes includes recalling multiplication tables, communicating sequences of simple fractions, using instruments to measure accurately, creating patterns with shapes and their transformations, and collecting and recording data includes formulating, modelling and recording authentic situations involving operations, comparing large numbers with each other, comparing time durations, and using properties of numbers to continue patterns includes using generalising from number properties and results of calculations, deriving strategies for unfamiliar multiplication and division tasks, comparing angles, communicating information using graphical displays and evaluating the appropriateness of different displays

Assessment

Assessment includes:

  • Teacher observations – ongoing
  • Anecdotal notes – ongoing
  • Topical Tests and Nelson Numeracy Assessments

Resources

Mathematics resources referenced regularly include:

  • iMaths
  • Interactive Australian Curriculum aligned websites such as Scootle and Studyladder

Benchmarks and Recommendations

By the end of Year 4, students should be able to choose appropriate strategies for calculations involving multiplication and division. They recognise common equivalent fractions in familiar contexts and make connections between fraction and decimal notations up to two decimal places. Students solve simple purchasing problems. They identify unknown quantities in number sentences. They describe number patterns resulting from multiplication. Students compare areas of regular and irregular shapes using informal units. They solve problems involving time duration. They interpret information contained in maps. Students identify dependent and independent events. They describe different methods for data collection and representation, and evaluate their effectiveness.

Students need to be able to recall multiplication facts to 10 x 10 and related division facts. Students are expected to locate familiar fractions on a number line. They continue number sequences involving multiples of single digit numbers. Students use scaled instruments to measure temperatures, lengths, shapes and objects. They convert between units of time. Students create symmetrical shapes and patterns. They classify angles in relation to a right angle. Students list the probabilities of everyday events. They construct data displays from given or collected data.

Year 4 Achievement Standard

By the end of Year 4, students choose appropriate strategies for calculations involving multiplication and division. They recognise common equivalent fractions in familiar contexts and make connections between fraction and decimal notations up to two decimal places. Students solve simple purchasing problems. They identify unknown quantities in number sentences. They describe number patterns resulting from multiplication. Students compare areas of regular and irregular shapes using informal units. They solve problems involving time duration. They interpret information contained in maps. Students identifydependent and independent events. They describe different methods for data collection and representation, and evaluatetheir effectiveness.

Students use the properties of odd and even numbers. They recall multiplication facts to 10 x 10 and related division facts. Students locate familiar fractions on a number line. They continue number sequences involving multiples of single digit numbers. Students use scaled instruments to measure temperatures, lengths, shapes and objects. They convert between units of time. Students create symmetrical shapes and patterns. They classify angles in relation to a right angle. Students list the probabilities of everyday events. They construct data displays from given or collected data.

Year 5

Overview

The Mathematics curriculum at Garden College aims to ensure that all students benefit from access to the power of mathematical reasoning and learn to apply mathematical understandings creatively and efficiently. Skills are developed through a range of open ended and interactive activities using concrete materials. This includes games, hands on activities, formal procedures and problem solving tasks. Lower Primary classes use the ‘Early Years Numeracy Program’ in which each individual student’s strengths and weaknesses are assessed and built upon.

Lesson Structure

During Mathematics sessions, the classroom is set up with enough floor space to allow interactive and engaging tuning in sessions to introduce new topics. In a typical lesson, students are introduced to the Mathematical concept, actively take part in an opening activity are exposed to focus words for that concept and complete an individual or group task to consolidate the Mathematical skills and understanding relevant to that lesson.

Scope and Sequences

In Year 5, there is a focus on developing the following abilities throughout the year:

Understanding Fluency Problem Solving Reasoning
includes making connections between representations of numbers, using fractions to represent probabilities, comparing and ordering fractions and decimals and representing them in various ways, describing transformations and identifying line and rotational symmetry includes choosing appropriate units of measurement for calculation of perimeter and area, using estimation to check the reasonableness of answers to calculations and using instruments to measure angles includes formulating and solving authentic problems using whole numbers and measurements and creating financial plans includes investigating strategies to perform calculations efficiently, continuing patterns involving fractions and decimals, interpreting results of chance experiments,  posing appropriate questions for data investigations and interpreting data sets

Assessment

Assessment includes:

  • NAPLAN
  • Teacher observations – ongoing
  • Anecdotal notes – ongoing
  • Topical Tests and Nelson Numeracy Assessments

Resources

Mathematics resources referenced regularly include:

  • iMaths
  • Interactive Australian Curriculum aligned websites such as Scootle and Studyladder

Benchmarks and Recommendations

By the end of Year 5, students are expected to be able to solve simple problems involving the four operations using a range of strategies. They check the reasonableness of answers using estimation and rounding. Students identify and describe factors and multiples. Students order decimals and unit fractions and locate them on number lines. They compute with fractions and decimals. They use appropriate units of measurement for length, area, volume, capacity and mass, and calculate perimeter and area of rectangles. They convert between 12 and 24 hour time and use a grid reference system to locate landmarks. They measure and construct different angles.

Year 5 Achievement Standard

By the end of Year 5, students solve simple problems involving the four operations using a range of strategies. They check the reasonableness of answers using estimation and rounding. Students identify and describe factors and multiples. They explain plans for simple budgets. Students connect three-dimensional objects with their two-dimensional representations. They describe transformations of two-dimensional shapes and identify line and rotational symmetry. Students compare and interpret different data sets.

Students order decimals and unit fractions and locate them on number lines. They add and subtract fractions with the same denominator. Students continue patterns by adding and subtracting fractions and decimals. They find unknown quantities in number sentences. They use appropriate units of measurement for length, area, volume, capacity and mass, and calculate perimeter and area of rectangles. They convert between 12 and 24 hour time. Students use a grid reference system to locatelandmarks. They measure and construct different angles. Students list outcomes of chance experiments with equally likely outcomes and assign probabilities between 0 and 1. Students pose questions to gather data, and construct data displays appropriate for the data.

Year 6

Overview

The Mathematics curriculum at Garden College aims to ensure that all students benefit from access to the power of mathematical reasoning and learn to apply mathematical understandings creatively and efficiently. Skills are developed through a range of open ended and interactive activities using concrete materials. This includes games, hands on activities, formal procedures and problem solving tasks. Lower Primary classes use the ‘Early Years Numeracy Program’ in which each individual student’s strengths and weaknesses are assessed and built upon.

Lesson Structure

During Mathematics sessions, the classroom is set up with enough floor space to allow interactive and engaging tuning in sessions to introduce new topics. The tables are set up in groups to allow flexibility to work both individually and in mixed ability groups, depending on what is required for that lesson. In a typical lesson, students are introduced to the Mathematical concept, actively take part in an opening activity are exposed to focus words for that concept and complete an individual or group task to consolidate the Mathematical skills and understanding relevant to that lesson.

Scope and Sequences

In year 6, there is a focus on developing the following abilities throughout the year:

Understanding Fluency Problem Solving Reasoning
includes describing properties of different sets of numbers, using fractions and decimals to describe probabilities, representing fractions and decimals in various ways and describing connections between them, and making reasonable estimations includes representing   integers on a number line, calculating simple percentages, using brackets appropriately, converting between fractions and decimals, using operations with fractions, decimals and percentages, measuring using metric units, and interpreting timetables includes formulating and solving authentic problems using fractions, decimals, percentages and measurements,  interpreting secondary data displays, and  finding the size of unknown angles includes explaining mental strategies for performing calculations, describing results for continuing number sequences, explaining the transformations of one shape into another, explaining why the actual results of chance experiments may differ from expected results

Assessment

Assessment includes:

  • Teacher observations – ongoing
  • Anecdotal notes – ongoing
  • Topical Tests and Nelson Numeracy Assessments

Resources

Mathematics resources referenced regularly include:

  • iMaths
  • Interactive Australian Curriculum aligned websites such as Scootle and Studyladder

Benchmarks and Recommendations

By the end of Year 6, students recognise the properties of prime, composite, square and triangular numbers. They describe the use of integers in everyday contexts. They solve problems involving all four operations with whole numbers. Students connect fractions, decimals and percentages as different representations of the same number and compute with them. Students make connections between the powers of 10 and the multiplication and division of decimals. Students connect decimal representations to the metric system and choose appropriate units of measurement to perform a calculation.

 

Students are also expected to be able to calculate a simple fraction of a quantity add, subtract and multiply decimals and divide decimals where the result is rational. Students should also be able to locate an ordered pair in any one of the four quadrants on the Cartesian plane.

Year 6 Achievement Standard

By the end of Year 6, students recognise the properties of prime, composite, square and triangular numbers. They describethe use of integers in everyday contexts. They solve problems involving all four operations with whole numbers. Students connect fractions, decimals and percentages as different representations of the same number. They solve problems involving the addition and subtraction of related fractions. Students make connections between the powers of 10 and the multiplication and division of decimals. They describe rules used in sequences involving whole numbers, fractions and decimals. Students connect decimal representations to the metric system and choose appropriate units of measurement to perform a calculation. They make connections between capacity and volume. They solve problems involving length and area. They interpret timetables. Students describe combinations of transformations. They solve problems using the properties of angles. Students compare observed and expected frequencies. They interpret and compare a variety of data displays including those displays for two categorical variables. They evaluate secondary data displayed in the media.

Students locate fractions and integers on a number line. They calculate a simple fraction of a quantity. They add, subtract and multiply decimals and divide decimals where the result is rational. Students calculate common percentage discounts on sale items. They write correct number sentences using brackets and order of operations. Students locate an ordered pair in any one of the four quadrants on the Cartesian plane. They construct simple prisms and pyramids. Students list and communicate probabilities using simple fractions, decimals and percentages.

Science

Year-Reception (FOUNDATION)

Overview

Through the learning of Science, students are given the opportunities to develop an understanding of important Science concepts and processes, the practices used to develop scientific knowledge, Science’s contribution to our culture and society and Science’s applications in our lives. The Science Curriculum at Garden College aims to improve students’ inquiry skills, general knowledge of Science or ‘Scientific Literacy’ and their understanding of Science as a human endeavor by highlighting different approaches to a scientific view of the world.

Lesson Structure

Science lessons at Garden College are taught using an integrated inquiry model. The lessons aim to engage students with hands on experiences and activities that encourage them to ask questions and with support, discover ways of finding answers to their enquiries. Incursions and excursions that focus on assisting students to make sense of the Science in their lives and around them are organised and complement, as well as contribute to the teaching of Science at Garden College.

Scope and Sequence

Throughout Science at Garden College, students learn that observations can be organised to reveal patterns and that these patterns can be used to make predictions about phenomena. In Reception, students observe and describe the behaviours and properties of everyday objects, materials and living things. They explore changes in the world around them, including changes that impact on them with the following scope and sequence of topics:

Reception Science Scope and Sequence
Term 1 Term 2 Term 3 Term 4
Habitats and Homes Weather Forecast What I need to survive Move it

Assessment

Assessment includes:

  • Diagnostic assessment during the engage phase of the unit to gauge student understandings
  • Ongoing anecdotal notes/checklist of the skills attained
  • Projects with attached rubrics
  • Formal and informal summative topic tests

Resources

Primary Connections units are the primary resource referenced when planning for Science at Garden College. Incursions and excursions relevant to the topics being taught are also valuable and complement the understandings that are being developed.

Benchmarks and Recommendations

Garden College aims to engage students in Science topics and then set up learning experiences where students are given the opportunity to explore and explain their understandings. Where a student has specific wonderings, it is encouraged that parents support them in seeking answers to their questions and making sense of the environment and Science in their daily lives through talk and research, where possible.

Foundation/Reception Year Achievement Standard

By the end of the Foundation/Reception year, students describe the properties and behaviour of familiar objects. They suggest how the environment affects them and other living things.

Students share observations of familiar objects and events.

Year 1

Overview

Through the learning of Science, students are given the opportunities to develop an understanding of important Science concepts and processes, the practices used to develop scientific knowledge, Science’s contribution to our culture and society and Science’s applications in our lives. The Science Curriculum at Garden College aims to improve students’ inquiry skills, general knowledge of Science or ‘Scientific Literacy’ and their understanding of Science as a human endeavour by highlighting different approaches to a scientific view of the world.

Lesson Structure

Science lessons at Garden College are taught using an integrated inquiry model. The lessons aim to engage students with hands on experiences and activities that encourage them to ask questions and with support, discover ways of finding answers to their enquiries. Incursions and excursions that focus on assisting students to make sense of the Science in their lives and around them are organised and complement, as well as contribute to the teaching of Science at Garden College.

Scope and Sequences

Throughout Science at Garden College, students learn that observations can be organised to reveal patterns and that these patterns can be used to make predictions about phenomena. In year 1, students describe objects and events that they encounter in their everyday lives, and the effects of interacting with materials and objects. They identify a range of habitats. They describe changes to things in their local environments and suggest how science helps people care for environments with the following scope and sequence of topics:

Year 1 Science Scope and Sequence
Term 1 Term 2 Term 3 Term 4
What is a Family Living Things: Habitat and Survival Changing Shape and Size: How? Light and Sound Phenomenon’s

Assessment

Assessment includes:

  • Diagnostic assessment during the engage phase of the unit to gauge student understandings
  • Ongoing anecdotal notes/checklist of the skills attained
  • Projects with attached rubrics
  • Formal and informal summative topic tests

Resources

Primary Connections units are the primary resource referenced when planning for Science at Garden College. Incursions and excursions relevant to the topics being taught are also valuable and complement the understandings that are being developed.

Benchmarks and Recommendations

Garden College aims to engage students in Science topics and then set up learning experiences where students are given the opportunity to explore and explain their understandings. Where a student has specific wonderings, it is encouraged that parents support them in seeking answers to their questions and making sense of the environment and Science in their daily lives through talk and research, where possible.

Year 1 Achievement Standard

By the end of Year 1, students describe objects and events that they encounter in their everyday lives, and the effects of interacting with materials and objects. They identify a range of habitats. They describe changes to things in their local environment and suggest how science helps people care for environments.

Students make predictions, and investigate everyday phenomena. They follow instructions to record and sort their observations and share their observations with others.

Year 2

Overview

Through the learning of Science, students are given the opportunities to develop an understanding of important Science concepts and processes, the practices used to develop scientific knowledge, Science’s contribution to our culture and society and Science’s applications in our lives. The Science Curriculum at Garden College aims to improve students’ inquiry skills, general knowledge of Science or ‘Scientific Literacy’ and their understanding of Science as a human endeavour by highlighting different approaches to a scientific view of the world.

Lesson Structure

Science lessons at Garden College are taught using an integrated inquiry model. The lessons aim to engage students with hands on experiences and activities that encourage them to ask questions and with support, discover ways of finding answers to their enquiries. Incursions and excursions that focus on assisting students to make sense of the Science in their lives and around them are organised and complement, as well as contribute to the teaching of Science at Garden College.

Scope and Sequences

Throughout Science at Garden College, students learn that observations can be organised to reveal patterns and that these patterns can be used to make predictions about phenomena. In Year 2, students describe changes to objects, materials and living things. They identify that certain materials and resources have different uses and describe examples of where science is used in people’s daily lives.

Students pose questions about their experiences and predict outcomes of investigations. They use informal measurements to make and compare observations. They follow instructions to record and represent their observations and communicate their ideas to others with the following scope and sequence of topics:

Year 2 Science Scope and Sequence
Term 1 Term 2 Term 3 Term 4
Similarities and Difference Materials Around Us and Water Push and Pull Life Cycles

Assessment

Assessment includes:

  • Diagnostic assessment during the engage phase of the unit to gauge student understandings
  • Ongoing anecdotal notes/checklist of the skills attained
  • Projects with attached rubrics
  • Formal and informal summative topic tests

 

Resources

Primary Connections units are the primary resource referenced when planning for Science at Garden College. Incursions and excursions relevant to the topics being taught are also valuable and complement the understandings that are being developed.

Benchmarks and Recommendations

Garden College aims to engage students in Science topics and then set up learning experiences where students are given the opportunity to explore and explain their understandings. Where a student has specific wonderings, it is encouraged that parents support them in seeking answers to their questions and making sense of the environment and Science in their daily lives through talk and research, where possible.

Year 2 Achievement Standard

By the end of Year 2, students describe changes to objects, materials and living things. They identify that certain materials and resources have different uses and describe examples of where science is used in people’s daily lives.

Students pose questions about their experiences and predict outcomes of investigations. They use informal measurements to make and compare observations. They follow instructions to record and represent their observations and communicate their ideas to others.

Year 3

Overview

Through the learning of Science, students are given the opportunities to develop an understanding of important Science concepts and processes, the practices used to develop scientific knowledge, Science’s contribution to our culture and society and Science’s applications in our lives. The Science Curriculum at Garden College aims to improve students’ inquiry skills, general knowledge of Science or ‘Scientific Literacy’ and their understanding of Science as a human endeavour by highlighting different approaches to a scientific view of the world.

Lesson Structure

Science lessons at Garden College are taught using an integrated inquiry model. The lessons aim to engage students with hands on experiences and activities that encourage them to ask questions and with support, discover ways of finding answers to their enquiries. Incursions and excursions that focus on assisting students to make sense of the Science in their lives and around them are organised and complement, as well as contribute to the teaching of Science at Garden College.

Scope and Sequence

Throughout Science at Garden College, students learn that observations can be organised to reveal patterns and that these patterns can be used to make predictions about phenomena. In Year 3, students use their understanding of the movement of the Earth, materials and the behaviour of heat to suggest explanations for everyday observations and describe features common to living things. They describe how they can use science investigations to respond to questions and identify where people use science knowledge in their lives with the following scope and sequence of topics:

Year 3 Science Scope and Sequence
Term 1 Term 2 Term 3 Term 4
How can we help the planet? Solid, Liquid and Gas Day and Night Living and Non-Living Things

Assessment

Assessment includes:

  • Diagnostic assessment during the engage phase of the unit to gauge student understandings
  • Ongoing anecdotal notes/checklist of the skills attained
  • Projects with attached rubrics
  • Formal and informal summative topic tests

Resources

Primary Connections units are the primary resource referenced when planning for Science at Garden College. Incursions and excursions relevant to the topics being taught are also valuable and complement the understandings that are being developed.

Benchmarks and Recommendations

Garden College aims to engage students in Science topics and then set up learning experiences where students are given the opportunity to explore and explain their understandings. Where a student has specific wonderings, it is encouraged that parents support them in seeking answers to their questions and making sense of the environment and Science in their daily lives through talk and research, where possible.

Year 3 Achievement Standard

By the end of Year 3, students use their understanding of the movement of the Earth, materials and the behaviour of heat to suggest explanations for everyday observations. They describe features common to living things. They describe how they can use science investigations to respond to questions and identify where people use science knowledge in their lives.

Students use their experiences to pose questions and predict the outcomes of investigations. They make formal measurements and follow procedures to collect and present observations in a way that helps to answer the investigation questions. Students suggest possible reasons for their findings. They describe how safety and fairness were considered in their investigations. They use diagrams and other representations to communicate their ideas.

Year 4

Overview

Through the learning of Science, students are given the opportunities to develop an understanding of important Science concepts and processes, the practices used to develop scientific knowledge, Science’s contribution to our culture and society and Science’s applications in our lives. The Science Curriculum at Garden College aims to improve students’ inquiry skills, general knowledge of Science or ‘Scientific Literacy’ and their understanding of Science as a human endeavour by highlighting different approaches to a scientific view of the world.

Lesson Structure

Science lessons at Garden College are taught using an integrated inquiry model. The lessons aim to engage students with hands on experiences and activities that encourage them to ask questions and with support, discover ways of finding answers to their enquiries. Incursions and excursions that focus on assisting students to make sense of the Science in their lives and around them are organised and complement, as well as contribute to the teaching of Science at Garden College.

Scope and Sequence

Throughout Science at Garden College, students learn that observations can be organised to reveal patterns and that these patterns can be used to make predictions about phenomena. In Year 4, students develop their understanding of a range of systems operating at different time and geographic scales. They broaden their understanding of classification and form and function through an exploration of the properties of natural and processed materials. They learn that forces include non-contact forces and begin to appreciate that some interactions result from phenomena that can’t be seen with the naked eye. They begin to appreciate that current systems, such as Earth’s surface, have characteristics that have resulted from past changes and that living things form part of systems. They understand that some systems change in predictable ways, such as through cycles. They also apply their knowledge to make predictions whilst focusing on the following topics throughout the year:

Year 4 Science Scope and Sequence
Term 1 Term 2 Term 3 Term 4
Weather Food Chains Webs and Survival, Direct and Indirect Forces The Changing Earth

Assessment

Assessment includes:

  • Diagnostic assessment during the engage phase of the unit to gauge student understandings
  • Ongoing anecdotal notes/checklist of the skills attained
  • Projects with attached rubrics
  • Formal and informal summative topic tests

Resources

Primary Connections units are the primary resource referenced when planning for Science at Garden College. Incursions and excursions relevant to the topics being taught are also valuable and complement the understandings that are being developed.

Benchmarks and Recommendations

Garden College aims to engage students in Science topics and then set up learning experiences where students are given the opportunity to explore and explain their understandings. Where a student has specific wonderings, it is encouraged that parents support them in seeking answers to their questions and making sense of the environment and Science in their daily lives through talk and research, where possible.

Year 4 Achievement Standard

By the end of Year 4, students apply the observable properties of materials to explain how objects and materials can be used. They use contact and non-contact forces to describe interactions between objects. They discuss how natural and human processes cause changes to the Earth’s surface. They describe relationships that assist the survival of living things and sequence key stages in the life cycle of a plant or animal. They identify when science is used to ask questions and make predictions. They describe situations where science understanding can influence their own and others’ actions.

Students follow instructions to identify investigable questions about familiar contexts and predict likely outcomes from investigations. They discuss ways to conduct investigations and safely use equipment to make and record observations. They use provided tables and simple column graphs to organise their data and identify patterns in data. Students suggest explanations for observations and compare their findings with their predictions. They suggest reasons why their methods were fair or not. They complete simple reports to communicate their methods and findings.

Year 5

Overview

Through the learning of Science, students are given the opportunities to develop an understanding of important Science concepts and processes, the practices used to develop scientific knowledge, Science’s contribution to our culture and society and Science’s applications in our lives. The Science Curriculum at Garden College aims to improve students’ inquiry skills, general knowledge of Science or ‘Scientific Literacy’ and their understanding of Science as a human endeavour by highlighting different approaches to a scientific view of the world.

Lesson Structure

Science lessons at Garden College are taught using an integrated inquiry model. The lessons aim to engage students with hands on experiences and activities that encourage them to ask questions and with support, discover ways of finding answers to their enquiries. Incursions and excursions that focus on assisting students to make sense of the Science in their lives and around them, are organised and complement, as well as contribute to the teaching of Science at Garden College.

Scope and Sequence

Through Science at Garden College, students learn that observations can be organised to reveal patterns and that these patterns can be used to make predictions about phenomena. In grade 5, students develop their understanding of a range of systems operating at different time and geographic scales. They broaden their understanding of classification and form and function through an exploration of the properties of natural and processed materials. They learn that forces include non-contact forces and begin to appreciate that some interactions result from phenomena that can’t be seen with the naked eye. They begin to appreciate that current systems, such as Earth’s surface, have characteristics that have resulted from past changes and that living things form part of systems. They understand that some systems change in predictable ways, such as through cycles. They also apply their knowledge to make predictions whilst focusing on the following topics throughout the year:

Year 5 Science Scope and Sequence
Term 1 Term 2 Term 3 Term 4
Adaptation Light Works Earth’s Place in Space Exploring the Make Up of Matter

Assessment

Assessment includes:

  • Diagnostic assessment during the engage phase of the unit to gauge student understandings
  • Ongoing anecdotal notes/checklist of the skills attained
  • Projects with attached rubrics
  • Formal and informal summative topic tests

Resources

Primary Connections units are the primary resource referenced when planning for Science at Garden College. Incursions and excursions relevant to the topics being taught are also valuable and complement the understandings that are being developed.

Benchmarks and Recommendations

Garden College aims to engage students in Science topics and then set up learning experiences where students are given the opportunity to explore and explain their understandings. Where a student has specific wonderings, it is encouraged that parents support them in seeking answers to their questions and making sense of the environment and Science in their daily lives through talk and research, where possible.

Year 5 Achievement Standard

By the end of Year 5, students classify substances according to their observable properties and behaviours. They explaineveryday phenomena associated with the transfer of light. They describe the key features of our solar system. They analysehow the form of living things enables them to function in their environments. Students discuss how scientific developments have affected people’s lives and how science knowledge develops from many people’s contributions.

Students follow instructions to pose questions for investigation, predict what might happen when variables are changed, and plan investigation methods. They use equipment in ways that are safe and improve the accuracy of their observations. Students construct tables and graphs to organise data and identify patterns. They use patterns in their data to suggest explanations and refer to data when they report findings. They describe ways to improve the fairness of their methods and communicate their ideas, methods and findings using a range of text types.

Year 6

Overview

Through the learning of Science, students are given the opportunities to develop an understanding of important Science concepts and processes, the practices used to develop scientific knowledge, Science’s contribution to our culture and society and Science’s applications in our lives. The Science Curriculum at Garden College aims to improve students’ inquiry skills, general knowledge of Science or ‘Scientific Literacy’ and their understanding of Science as a human endeavor by highlighting different approaches to a scientific view of the world.

Lesson Structure

Science lessons at Garden College are taught using an integrated inquiry model. The lessons aim to engage students with hands on experiences and activities that encourage them to ask questions and with support, discover ways of finding answers to their enquiries. Incursions and excursions that focus on assisting students to make sense of the Science in their lives and around them are organised and complement, as well as contribute to the teaching of Science at Garden College.

Scope and Sequence

Throughout Science at Garden College, students learn that observations can be organised to reveal patterns and that these patterns can be used to make predictions about phenomena. In year 6, students develop their understanding of a range of systems operating at different time and geographic scales. They broaden their understanding of classification and form and function through an exploration of the properties of natural and processed materials. They learn that forces include non-contact forces and begin to appreciate that some interactions result from phenomena that can’t be seen with the naked eye. They begin to appreciate that current systems, such as Earth’s surface, have characteristics that have resulted from past changes and that living things form part of systems. They understand that some systems change in predictable ways, such as through cycles. They also apply their knowledge to make predictions whilst focusing on the following topics throughout the year:

Year 6 Science Scope and Sequence
Term 1 Term 2 Term 3 Term 4
Are you a discerning consumer? It’s Electrifying Natural Disasters and their Effects Extreme Environments and Survival

Assessment

Assessment includes:

  • Diagnostic assessment during the engage phase of the unit to gauge student understandings
  • Ongoing anecdotal notes/checklist of the skills attained
  • Projects with attached rubrics
  • Formal and informal summative topic tests

Resources

Primary Connections units are the primary resource referenced when planning for Science at Garden College. Incursions and excursions relevant to the topics being taught are also valuable and complement the understandings that are being developed.

Benchmarks and Recommendations

Garden College aims to engage students in Science topics and then set up learning experiences where students are given the opportunity to explore and explain their understandings. Where a student has specific wonderings, it is encouraged that parents support them in seeking answers to their questions and making sense of the environment and Science in their daily lives through talk and research, where possible.

Year 6 Achievement Standard

By the end of Year 6, students compare and classify different types of observable changes to materials. They analyserequirements for the transfer of electricity and describe how energy can be transformed from one form to another to generate electricity. They explain how natural events cause rapid change to the Earth’s surface. They describe and predict the effect of environmental changes on individual living things. Students explain how scientific knowledge is used in decision making and identify contributions to the development of science by people from a range of cultures.

Students follow procedures to develop investigable questions and design investigations into simple cause-and-effect relationships. They identify variables to be changed and measured and describe potential safety risks when planning methods. They collect, organise and interpret their data, identifying where improvements to their methods or research could improve the data. They describe and analyse relationships in data using graphic representations and construct multi-modal texts to communicate ideas, methods and findings.

History & Geography

Year-Reception (FOUNDATION)

Overview

History involves the learning and understanding of human experience through the use of various references and derived evidence. The History Curriculum addresses world history as a whole, incorporating within it, Australian history, in order to give students a well-rounded understanding of history on a local, regional and global level. Teaching Australia in the light of world history helps to increase student appreciation of Australian history and the development of Australia as a nation as well as provide them with a greater understanding of Australia’s indigenous peoples, their identity and cultures.

Lesson Structure

While History is a key learning area, it is not taught in isolation. Lessons to develop an understanding of History emphasises process as well as product, moving away from the acquisition of facts to the development of understandings about concepts and generalisations. These understandings are integrated into English and Mathematics as well as other learning areas. The focus is on developing students’ investigative and thinking skills and contribute to their ability to participate effectively in society. The lessons aim to engage students with hands on experiences and activities that encourage them to ask questions and with support, discover ways of finding answers to their enquiries. Lessons also contribute to enhancing self-esteem by encouraging students to take responsibility for their own learning as they acquire cooperative learning habits, whilst working in teams.

Scope and Sequence

History is organised into two interrelated strands: Historical Knowledge and Understanding and Historical Skills. The two strands are integrated in the development of term planners. The Historical Knowledge and Understanding strand provides the contexts through which particular skills are to be developed while the Historical Skills provide a common focus for the teaching and learning of the content. The following scope and sequence is followed when teaching History:

Reception History Scope and Sequence
Term 1 Term 2 Term 3 Term 4
Personal and Family Histories

Assessment

Assessment includes:

  • Diagnostic assessment during the engage phase of the History Inquiry unit to gauge understandings
  • Ongoing anecdotal notes/checklist of the skills attained
  • Projects with attached rubrics
  • Formal and informal summative topic tests

Resources

Graphic organizers are used to frame students’ wonderings and their ideas and the direction for further learning and inquiry into the topic is determined and personalized to suit each student and class.

Benchmarks and Recommendations

Due to History being an inquiry into the past, the collection of evidence to form understandings is very important. Parents’ verbal interactions with students and their assistance in recounting personal and family Histories is vital in developing these understandings.

Reception/Foundation Year Achievement Standard

By the end of the Reception/Foundation year, students identify similarities and differences between families. They recognisehow important family events are commemorated.

Students sequence familiar events in order. They pose questions about their past. Students relate a story about their past using a range of texts.

Year 1

Overview

History involves the learning and understanding of human experience through the use of various references and derived evidence. The History Curriculum addresses world history as a whole, incorporating within it, Australian history, in order to give students a well-rounded understanding of history on a local, regional and global level. Teaching Australia in the light of world history helps to increase student appreciation of Australian history and the development of Australia as a nation as well as provide them with a greater understanding of Australia’s indigenous peoples, their identity and cultures.

Lesson Structure

While History is a key learning area, it is not taught in isolation. Lessons to develop an understanding of History emphasises process as well as product, moving away from the acquisition of facts to the development of understandings about concepts and generalisations. These understandings are integrated into English and Mathematics as well as other learning areas. The focus is on developing students’ investigative and thinking skills and contribute to their ability to participate effectively in society. The lessons aim to engage students with hands on experiences and activities that encourage them to ask questions and with support, discover ways of finding answers to their enquiries. Lessons also contribute to enhancing self-esteem by encouraging students to take responsibility for their own learning as they acquire cooperative learning habits, whilst working in teams.

Scope and Sequence

History is organised into two interrelated strands: Historical Knowledge and Understanding and Historical Skills. The two strands are integrated in the development of term planners. The Historical Knowledge and Understanding strand provides the contexts through which particular skills are to be developed while the Historical Skills provide a common focus for the teaching and learning of the content. The following scope and sequence is followed when teaching History:

Teaching staff will add the topic content when designing their programs

History – Year 1 – Scope and Sequence
Term 1 Term 2 Term 3 Term 4
Present and Past Family Life

Assessment

Assessment includes:

  • Diagnostic assessment during the engage phase of the History Inquiry unit to gauge understandings
  • Ongoing anecdotal notes/checklist of the skills attained
  • Projects with attached rubrics
  • Formal and informal summative topic tests

Resources

Graphic organizers are used to frame students’ wonderings and their ideas and the direction for further learning and inquiry into the topic is determined and personalized to suit each student and class.

Benchmarks and Recommendations

Due to History being an inquiry into the past, the collection of evidence to form understandings is very important. Parents’ verbal interactions with students and their assistance in recounting personal and family Histories is vital in developing these understandings.

Year 1 Achievement Standard

By the end of Year 1, students explain how some aspects of daily life have changed over recent time while others have remained the same. They describe personal and family events that have significance.

Students sequence events in order, using everyday terms about the passing of time. They pose questions about the past and examine sources (physical and visual) to suggest answers to these questions. Students relate stories about life in the past, using a range of texts.

Year 2

Overview

History, involves the learning and understanding of human experience through the use of various references and derived evidence. The History Curriculum addresses world history as a whole, incorporating within it, Australian history, in order to give students a well-rounded understanding of history on a local, regional and global level. Teaching Australia in the light of world history helps to increase student appreciation of Australian history and the development of Australia as a nation as well as provide them with a greater understanding of Australia’s indigenous peoples, their identity and cultures.

Lesson Structure

While History is a key learning area, it is not taught in isolation. Lessons to develop an understanding of History emphasises process as well as product, moving away from the acquisition of facts to the development of understandings about concepts and generalisations. These understandings are integrated into English and Mathematics as well as other learning areas. The focus is on developing students’ investigative and thinking skills and contribute to their ability to participate effectively in society. The lessons aim to engage students with hands on experiences and activities that encourage them to ask questions and with support, discover ways of finding answers to their enquiries. Lessons also contribute to enhancing self-esteem by encouraging students to take responsibility for their own learning as they acquire cooperative learning habits, whilst working in teams.

Scope and Sequence

History is organised into two interrelated strands: Historical Knowledge and Understanding and Historical Skills. The two strands are integrated in the development of term planners. The Historical Knowledge and Understanding strand provides the contexts through which particular skills are to be developed while the Historical Skills provide a common focus for the teaching and learning of the content with the following History scope and sequence:

Teaching staff will add the topic content when designing their programs

History – Year 2 – Scope and Sequence
Term 1 Term 2 Term 3 Term 4
The Past in the Present

Assessment

Assessment includes:

  • Diagnostic assessment during the engage phase of the History Inquiry unit to gauge understandings
  • Ongoing anecdotal notes/checklist of the skills attained
  • Projects with attached rubrics
  • Formal and informal summative topic tests

Resources

Graphic organizers are used to frame students’ wonderings and their ideas and the direction for further learning and inquiry into the topic is determined and personalized to suit each student and class.

Benchmarks and Recommendations

Due to History being an inquiry into the past, the collection of evidence to form understandings is very important. Parents’ verbal interactions with students and their assistance in recounting personal and family Histories is vital in developing these understandings.

Year 2 Achievement Standard

By the end of Year 2, students analyse aspects of daily life to identify how some have changed over recent time while others have remained the same. They describe a person, site or event of significance in the local community.

Students sequence events in order, using a range of terms related to time. They pose questions about the past and use sources provided (physical, visual, oral) to answer these questions. They compare objects from the past and present. Students develop a narrative about the past using a range of texts.

Year 3

Overview

History, involves the learning and understanding of human experience through the use of various references and derived evidence. The History Curriculum addresses world history as a whole, incorporating within it, Australian history, in order to give students a well-rounded understanding of history on a local, regional and global level. Teaching Australia in the light of world history helps to increase student appreciation of Australian history and the development of Australia as a nation as well as provide them with a greater understanding of Australia’s indigenous peoples, their identity and cultures.

Lesson Structure

While History is a key learning area, it is not taught in isolation. Lessons to develop an understanding of History emphasises process as well as product, moving away from the acquisition of facts to the development of understandings about concepts and generalisations. These understandings are integrated into English and Mathematics as well as other learning areas. The focus is on developing students’ investigative and thinking skills and contribute to their ability to participate effectively in society. The lessons aim to engage students with hands on experiences and activities that encourage them to ask questions and with support, discover ways of finding answers to their enquiries. Lessons also contribute to enhancing self-esteem by encouraging students to take responsibility for their own learning as they acquire cooperative learning habits, whilst working in teams.

Scope and Sequence

History is organised into two interrelated strands: Historical Knowledge and Understanding and Historical Skills. The two strands are integrated in the development of term planners. The Historical Knowledge and Understanding strand provides the contexts through which particular skills are to be developed while the Historical Skills provide a common focus for the teaching and learning of the content. The following scope and sequence is followed when teaching History:

Teaching staff will add the topic content when designing their programs

History – Year 3 – Scope and Sequence
Term 1 Term 2 Term 3 Term 4
Community and Remembrance

Assessment

Assessment includes:

  • Diagnostic assessment during the engage phase of the History Inquiry unit to gauge understandings
  • Ongoing anecdotal notes/checklist of the skills attained
  • Projects with attached rubrics
  • Formal and informal summative topic tests

Resources

Graphic organizers are used to frame students’ wonderings and their ideas and the direction for further learning and inquiry into the topic is determined and personalized to suit each student and class.

Benchmarks and Recommendations

Due to History being an inquiry into the past, the collection of evidence to form understandings is very important. Parents’ verbal interactions with students and their assistance in recounting personal and family Histories is vital in developing these understandings.

Year 3 Achievement Standard

By the end of Year 3, students explain how communities changed in the past. They describe the experiences of an individual or group. They identify events and aspects of the past that have significance in the present.

Students sequence events and people (their lifetime) in chronological order, with reference to key dates. They pose questions about the past and locate information from sources (written, physical, visual, oral) to answer these questions. Students develop texts, including narratives, using terms denoting time.

Year 4

Overview

History, involves the learning and understanding of human experience through the use of various references and derived evidence. The History Curriculum addresses world history as a whole, incorporating within it, Australian history, in order to give students a well-rounded understanding of history on a local, regional and global level. Teaching Australia in the light of world history helps to increase student appreciation of Australian history and the development of Australia as a nation as well as provide them with a greater understanding of Australia’s indigenous peoples, their identity and cultures.

Lesson Structure

While History is a key learning area, it is not taught in isolation. Lessons to develop an understanding of History emphasises process as well as product, moving away from the acquisition of facts to the development of understandings about concepts and generalisations. These understandings are integrated into English and Mathematics as well as other learning areas. The focus is on developing students’ investigative and thinking skills and contribute to their ability to participate effectively in society. The lessons aim to engage students with hands on experiences and activities that encourage them to ask questions and with support, discover ways of finding answers to their enquiries. Lessons also contribute to enhancing self-esteem by encouraging students to take responsibility for their own learning as they acquire cooperative learning habits, whilst working in teams.

Scope and Sequence

History is organised into two interrelated strands: Historical Knowledge and Understanding and Historical Skills. The two strands are integrated in the development of term planners. The Historical Knowledge and Understanding strand provides the contexts through which particular skills are to be developed while the Historical Skills provide a common focus for the teaching and learning of the content. The following scope and sequence is followed when teaching History:

Teaching staff will add the topic content when designing their programs

History – Year 4 – Scope and Sequence
Term 1 Term 2 Term 3 Term 4
First Contacts

Assessment

Assessment includes:

  • Diagnostic assessment during the engage phase of the History Inquiry unit to gauge understandings
  • Ongoing anecdotal notes/checklist of the skills attained
  • Projects with attached rubrics
  • Formal and informal summative topic tests

Resources

Graphic organizers are used to frame students’ wonderings and their ideas and the direction for further learning and inquiry into the topic is determined and personalized to suit each student and class.

Benchmarks and Recommendations

Due to History being an inquiry into the past, the collection of evidence to form understandings is very important. Parents’ verbal interactions with students and their assistance in recounting personal and family Histories is vital in developing these understandings.

Year 4 Achievement Standard

By the end of Year 4, students explain how and why life changed in the past, and identify aspects of the past that remained the same. They describe the experiences of an individual or group over time. They recognise the significance of events in bringing about change.

Students sequence events and people (their lifetime) in chronological order to identify key dates. They pose a range of questions about the past. They identify sources (written, physical, visual, oral), and locate information to answer these questions. They recognise different points of view. Students develop and present texts, including narratives, using historical terms.

Year 5

Overview

History, involves the learning and understanding of human experience through the use of various references and derived evidence. The History Curriculum addresses world history as a whole, incorporating within it, Australian history, in order to give students a well-rounded understanding of history on a local, regional and global level. Teaching Australia in the light of world history helps to increase student appreciation of Australian history and the development of Australia as a nation as well as provide them with a greater understanding of Australia’s indigenous peoples, their identity and cultures.

Lesson Structure

While History is a key learning area, it is not taught in isolation. Lessons to develop an understanding of History emphasises process as well as product, moving away from the acquisition of facts to the development of understandings about concepts and generalisations. These understandings are integrated into English and Mathematics as well as other learning areas. The focus is on developing students’ investigative and thinking skills and contribute to their ability to participate effectively in society. The lessons aim to engage students with hands on experiences and activities that encourage them to ask questions and with support, discover ways of finding answers to their enquiries. Lessons also contribute to enhancing self-esteem by encouraging students to take responsibility for their own learning as they acquire cooperative learning habits, whilst working in teams.

Scope and Sequence

History is organised into two interrelated strands: Historical Knowledge and Understanding and Historical Skills. The two strands are integrated in the development of term planners. The Historical Knowledge and Understanding strand provides the contexts through which particular skills are to be developed while the Historical Skills provide a common focus for the teaching and learning of the content. The following scope and sequence is followed when teaching History:

Teaching staff will add the topic content when designing their programs

History – Year 5 – Scope and Sequence
Term 1 Term 2 Term 3 Term 4
The Australian Colonies

Assessment

Assessment includes:

  • Diagnostic assessment during the engage phase of the History Inquiry unit to gauge understandings
  • Ongoing anecdotal notes/checklist of the skills attained
  • Projects with attached rubrics
  • Formal and informal summative topic tests

Resources

Graphic organizers are used to frame students’ wonderings and their ideas and the direction for further learning and inquiry into the topic is determined and personalized to suit each student and class.

Benchmarks and Recommendations

Due to History being an inquiry into the past, the collection of evidence to form understandings is very important. Parents’ verbal interactions with students and their assistance in recounting personal and family Histories is vital in developing these understandings.

Year 5 Achievement Standard

By the end of Year 5, students identify the causes and effects of change on particular communities, and describe aspects of the past that remained the same. They describe the different experiences of people in the past. They describe the significance of people and events in bringing about change.

Students sequence events and people (their lifetime) in chronological order, using timelines. When researching, students develop questions to frame an historical inquiry. They identify a range of sources and locate and record information related to this inquiry. They examine sources to identify points of view. Students develop, organise and present their texts, particularly narratives and descriptions, using historical terms and concepts.

Year 6

Overview

History, involves the learning and understanding of human experience through the use of various references and derived evidence. The History Curriculum addresses world history as a whole, incorporating within it, Australian history, in order to give students a well-rounded understanding of history on a local, regional and global level. Teaching Australia in the light of world history helps to increase student appreciation of Australian history and the development of Australia as a nation as well as provide them with a greater understanding of Australia’s indigenous peoples, their identity and cultures.

Lesson Structure

While History is a key learning area, it is not taught in isolation. Lessons to develop an understanding of History emphasises process as well as product, moving away from the acquisition of facts to the development of understandings about concepts and generalisations. These understandings are integrated into English and Mathematics as well as other learning areas. The focus is on developing students’ investigative and thinking skills and contribute to their ability to participate effectively in society. The lessons aim to engage students with hands on experiences and activities that encourage them to ask questions and with support, discover ways of finding answers to their enquiries. Lessons also contribute to enhancing self-esteem by encouraging students to take responsibility for their own learning as they acquire cooperative learning habits, whilst working in teams.

Scope and Sequence

History is organised into two interrelated strands: Historical Knowledge and Understanding and Historical Skills. The two strands are integrated in the development of term planners. The Historical Knowledge and Understanding strand provides the contexts through which particular skills are to be developed while the Historical Skills provide a common focus for the teaching and learning of the content. The following scope and sequence is followed when teaching History:

Teaching staff will add the topic content when designing their programs

History – Year 6 – Scope and Sequence
Term 1 Term 2 Term 3 Term 4
Australia as a Nation

Assessment

Assessment includes:

  • Diagnostic assessment during the engage phase of the History Inquiry unit to gauge understandings
  • Ongoing anecdotal notes/checklist of the skills attained
  • Projects with attached rubrics
  • Formal and informal summative topic tests

Resources

Graphic organizers are used to frame students’ wonderings and their ideas and the direction for further learning and inquiry into the topic is determined and personalized to suit each student and class.

Benchmarks and Recommendations

Due to History being an inquiry into the past, the collection of evidence to form understandings is very important. Parents’ verbal interactions with students and their assistance in recounting personal and family Histories is vital in developing these understandings.

Year 6 Achievement Standard

By the end of Year 6, students identify change and continuity and describe the causes and effects of change on society. They compare the different experiences of people in the past. They explain the significance of an individual and group.

Students sequence events and people (their lifetime) in chronological order, and represent time by creating timelines. When researching, students develop questions to frame an historical inquiry. They identify a range of sources and locate and compare information to answer inquiry questions. They examine sources to identify and describe points of view. Students develop texts, particularly narratives and descriptions. In developing these texts and organising and presenting their information, they use historical terms and concepts and incorporate relevant sources.

Geography

Rationale

Geography is a structured way of exploring, analysing and understanding the characteristics of the places that make up our world, using the concepts of place, space, environment, interconnection, sustainability, scale and change. It addresses scales from the personal to the global and time periods from a few years to thousands of years.

Geography integrates knowledge from the natural sciences, social sciences and humanities to build a holistic understanding of the world. Students learn to question why the world is the way it is, reflect on their relationships with and responsibilities for that world, and propose actions designed to shape a socially just and sustainable future.

The concept of place develops students’ curiosity and wonder about the diversity of the world’s places, peoples, cultures and environments. Students use the concept of space to investigate the effects of location and distance on the characteristics of places, the significance of spatial distributions, and the organisation and management of space at different scales.

Students use the concept of interconnection to understand how the causal relationships between places, people and environments produce constant changes to their characteristics.

Through the concept of sustainability students explore how the environmental functions that support their life and wellbeing can be sustained.

Geography uses an inquiry approach to assist students to make meaning of their world. At Garden College Geography is part of the integrated studies curriculum.

The Australian Curriculum’ Geography curriculum is structured in two strands:

  • Geographical Knowledge and Understanding – which includes a study of environmental and human aspects of geography at local, national, regional and global scales. This strand involves the investigation of the facts, generalisations, principles, theories and models developed in geography. The geography curriculum recognises that this knowledge is dynamic and its interpretation can be contested, that people can come to different conclusions about the same questions, and that opinions and conclusions must be supported by evidence and logical argument. This strand involves students developing the ability to see the relationships between geographical concepts (place, space, environment, interconnection, sustainability, scale and change), to construct explanatory frameworks to illustrate relationships, and to synthesise them into an integrated whole. It is also about applying this geographical knowledge to new situations or to solve problems by thinking and planning for action.
  • Geography Inquiry and Skills: This strand promotes a process of inquiry by which students learn new geographical knowledge and deepen their understanding. This is developed through investigations that involve observations or questions (for example, about environmental, social, cultural and economic features) the collection and interpretation of information to develop conclusions; and reflection on the overall process. Inquiries may be undertaken by individual students, or collaboratively, and may vary in scale, geographic context, and the time taken for the investigation. There is an emphasis on the techniques that geographers use in the field and in the classroom. Students learn to think critically about the methods used to obtain information and to analyse and interpret the information in order to communicate their findings.

Key skills which are progressively developed include (but are not limited to) formulating a question and research action plan that is of a specific geographical nature, developing observation recording skills including diagrams such as field sketches, interpreting and developing maps, tables, photographs, satellite images, diagrams, graphs and other data, using a variety of spatial technologies and communicating with appropriate and relevant geographical vocabulary.

The knowledge, skills and dispositions students need to succeed in life and work in the twenty-first century have been identified in the Australian Curriculum as general capabilities. There are seven general capabilities which will be integrated within lesson planning so that Geography is contextual:

  • Literacy
  • Numeracy
  • Competence in information and communication technology (ICT)
  • Critical and creative thinking
  • Ethical behavior
  • Ethical behavior
  • Personal and social competence
  • Intercultural understanding

Scope and sequence Reception to Year 6

Reception to 6 Geography Scope and Sequence
Reception Year 1 Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 Year 5 Year 6
We discover the local community – My Home We discover the local community – My Local Community We discover the local community – My Land Australia Australia is a unique place with much to be proud of We live in an environment where the changing environment affects us Climate and Activities – We live in a world where the changing environment affects us Going Global – Environments are changing and we need to take responsibility for their sustainability

RECEPTION/FOUNDATION TO YEAR 2

Overview

Curriculum Focus – Exploring local and more distant places

In Reception/Foundation to Year 2 the curriculum focuses on exploring the geography of their lives and their own place, to get students thinking about aspects of place, space and environment. They observe, describe and classify the features of their place, using models, maps, sounds, stories and drawings. Learning about their own place, and building a connection with it, also contributes to their sense of identity and belonging. While the local place should be the initial focus for learning, young students are also aware of and interested in more distant places and the curriculum provides opportunities to build on this curiosity. Students find out about the ways they are connected to places throughout the world through family and cultural groups in their community, the origin of familiar products, travel and world events.

Students’ spatial thinking starts by learning about direction and distance, and about the ways that familiar things can be arranged in space for different purposes. They become aware of the distances between places and how distance constrains their activities. Students are introduced to the concept of environment through the exploration of the natural and built environment of their own and other places, by finding out about the environmental resources they use and where these come from, and by recognising that weather varies from place to place. They become aware of why the environment needs to be cared for.

Specific geographical skills which are introduced throughout the early years include creating, interpreting and using a map, using directional language, understanding scale and distance, and recording data related to weather.

Lesson Structures

The equivalent of one Term will be dedicated to the study of Geography. In the early years it will be part of the integrated curriculum using play, inquiry and higher order thinking to discover their world. Models, maps and dioramas will be developed so display deep knowledge and understandings. Students will use geography language to describe their constructions, diagrams, maps and written work.

Geography emphasises inquiry-based learning and teaching, and opportunities for student-led questioning and investigation will be provided at all stages of schooling. The curriculum will provide opportunities for fieldwork and excursions, as this is an essential component of geographical learning. Fieldwork is any study undertaken outside the classroom, and could be within the school grounds, around the neighbouring streets, or in more distant locations.

Scope and Sequence

  Reception to Year 2 – Geography Scope and Sequence
  Term 1 Term 2 Term 3 Term 4
Rec Where we Live – My home
Year 1 Not everywhere is the same – My local Community
Year 2 Links to our world – My land Australia

Reception/Foundation Year

Big idea: Where we live

The Foundation curriculum builds student’s understanding of places. Students explore the place in which they live and places that they know. They observe natural features and built features of these places and consider places that are special to them. Space is introduced when students observe how places and objects are arranged, and experiment with different ways of arranging familiar spaces, like the classroom. The study of weather in science is extended through discussion of how the daily weather influences the location of activities. Students are encouraged to ask questions about the world that they can answer through collective inquiry involving observation and play. They will be introduced to the stages of inquiry by reflecting on how their thinking has changed.

Year 1

Big Idea: Not everywhere is the same

The Year 1 curriculum expands the understanding of familiar places explored in Foundation. Students are guided to see familiar places as part of bigger places and they begin identifying how places change. Spatial understanding is expanded from exploring the arrangement of space in Foundation to recognising ways that places are used. Students learn more about the environmental features of places, and begin to consider ways of caring for the environment. The inquiry process is guided and students are introduced to geographical tools that help them develop their skills and answer their questions.

Year 2

Big Idea: Links to our world

The Year 2 curriculum builds on student learning about places in earlier years by exploring people’s connections with other places. Students then expand their geographical knowledge by finding out about these other places and using an increasing variety of information sources. Their spatial understanding is extended from reviewing the use of spaces to examining how distance influences the places they go to. Year 2 learning about environment builds on the Foundation study of weather and students learn about the weather in different places. Students apply their previous learning about environment as they recognise the environment as the source for things they use and consider how significant places are protected. The inquiry process continues to be guided and students are introduced to geographical tools and skills that help them answer their questions.

Assessment

The teaching and learning methods outlined under ‘lesson structure’ will be supported by forms of assessment that enable students to demonstrate their ability to think geographically and apply geographical skills. This will include:

  • The construction of models, diagrams, maps, graphs
  • Written work
  • Oral presentations
  • Peer assessment

Resources

No particular resources have been purchased. When staff are selected they will ascertain appropriate resources both in hard and electronic copies. The Australian Curriculum Geography Content Descriptors and Elaborations will provide staff with information when programming.

Australian Curriculum Achievement Standards

By the end of the Reception/Foundation Year, students describe the key characteristics of some familiar places. They explain how particular places are special to them and how they can be cared for. They locate and represent places and features on simple maps. They can talk about how weather has an effect on life in a place. Students can represent and describe the layout of familiar places.

Students pose and answer questions about their world by observing familiar places. They sort their observations and represent them using a given format. Students talk about how their thinking has changed.

By the end of Year 1, students explain how some places are different in their use, and change over time. They describe the different environmental features of places and explain how people can have an effect upon places and the environments within them.

Students pose and respond to questions in a guided inquiry using information sources provided. They use data and images to draw conclusions about places. They present their findings using a variety of geographical texts (oral, visual, written).

 

By the end of Year 2, students explain that they are connected to other places and that distance influences people’s use of a place. They recognise that the environment is the source of everything they use, suggest consequences of consumption and examine how the significance of an environment contributes to its use.

Students pose and respond to several questions using fieldwork and information sources provided. They collect and sort their information to identify patterns and draw conclusions. When communicating their findings, students use geographical tools and geographical vocabulary. They talk about how their learning has changed.

Years 3 and 4

Overview

Curriculum focus: Investigating places

In Years 3 & 4 students are able to ask more complex geographical questions, and to contribute to planning their geographical inquiries and learning. They can provide reasons for what they think, and justify their conclusions. The curriculum focus shifts from exploration to more purposeful investigation.

Students learn ways to describe and compare places, about different cultures, and to investigate how people perceive and think about places. They are aware of a larger number of places, and may have travelled to some of them. Their spatial knowledge is developed through studies of the major divisions of the earth’s surface, of the location and main characteristics of the States, Territories and major cities of Australia, and of ways of explaining a spatial distribution. This is in conjunction with the history curriculum.

They investigate several aspects of Aboriginal Peoples’ and Torres Strait Islander Peoples’ life before European colonial presence. Their environmental understanding is developed through studies of landforms, weather and their personal environmental impact. In their investigations, students collaborate to collect and record evidence, analyse, draw conclusions and communicate their findings, using appropriate geographical vocabulary.

Specific geographical skills in Years 3-4 build on those skills which are included in the early years and also include the introduction of the use of spatial technologies, map projections and the use of scale.

Lesson Structure

The equivalent of one Term will be dedicated to the study of Geography. In Years 3 and 4 Geography will use inquiry and higher order thinking to discover the student’s world. Models, maps and dioramas will be developed so display deep knowledge and understandings. Students will use geography language to describe their constructions, diagrams, maps and written work.

Geography emphasises inquiry-based learning and teaching, and opportunities for student-led questioning and investigation should be provided at all stages of schooling. The curriculum should also provide opportunities for fieldwork at all stages, as this is an essential component of geographical learning. Fieldwork is any study undertaken outside the classroom, and could be within the school grounds, around the neighbouring streets, or in more distant locations. These teaching and learning methods should be supported by forms of assessment that enable students to demonstrate their ability to think geographically and apply geographical skills.

Scope and Sequence

  Years 3 and 4 – Geography Scope and Sequence
  Term 1 Term 2 Term 3 Term 4
Year 3 How we Live – Australia is a unique place with much to be proud of
Year 4 How we Live – We live in an environment where the changing environment affects us

Year 3

Big Idea: How we live

The Year 3 curriculum for geography builds on previous learning about places as students are guided to describe and compare places in a geographic way. Students build on their learning about links between people and places as they examine the personal and cultural connections people have to places. In space, students apply abstract thinking to their earlier learning about layout and distances as they build understanding of how maps represent places. Students are also introduced to the ways natural resources are distributed across Australia and the world. This builds on Year 2 learning about the environment as the source of all they use and links to environment, where the concept of sustainability is formally introduced. Students then consider their own resource use and how they can reduce their impact. The inquiry strand builds on Years 1 and 2 as students are asked to identify whether questions are geographical and they consider the primary sources and secondary sources they can use to find answers.

 

Year 4

Big Idea: How we live

The Year 4 curriculum for geography builds on Year 3 exploration of connection to places by providing opportunities for students to consider the culture of places. Students link their learning to history by exploring the geography and spatial arrangement of Australia before European colonial presence. This also introduces them to exploring the geographic features of Australia and how they are distributed. To build on their earlier learning about distant places, investigation of places and environments moves to the global scale. Environment is further developed through studies of landforms and the influence of air masses on local weather. Students are asked to identify whether questions are geographical and consider the primary sources and secondary sources they can use to find answers. Students also explore cause and effect relationships by suggesting consequences for actions.

Assessment

The teaching and learning methods outlined under ‘lesson structure’ will be supported by forms of assessment that enable students to demonstrate their ability to think geographically and apply geographical skills. This will include:

  • The construction of models, diagrams, maps, graphs
  • Written work
  • Oral presentation
  • Peer assessment

Resources

No particular resources have been purchased. When staff are selected they will ascertain appropriate resources both in hard and electronic copies. The Australian Curriculum Geography Content Descriptors and Elaborations will provide staff with information when programming.

Australian Curriculum Achievement Standards

By the end of Year 3, students describe and compare the geographical features of places and recognise that people have different connections to places. They recognise that maps are used as geographical tools to represent places and relationships between places. They explain the location, uses and management of some natural resources in relation to sustainability.

Students select appropriate questions for a geographical inquiry. They suggest information sources and collect data in response to questions. They draw conclusions from their investigation. When communicating their conclusions, they use geographical tools and geographical vocabulary.

By the end of Year 4, students explain how the environment shapes the ways in which people live. They investigate and describe cultures or different ways of life around the world. They analyse personal and cultural perceptions of places and how these are described. Students describe the diversity of Australian environments and consider how natural processes have shaped the environment over time.

Students pose geographical questions and speculate about their answers. They identify geographical sources to gather information or data and consider the usefulness of these sources. They evaluate data to suggest relationships or patterns. Students draw conclusions from their inquiry and suggest responses. When communicating their conclusions, they use appropriate geographical tools and geographical vocabulary, using geographical conventions to show and describe what they have learned from an inquiry.

Years 5 and 6

Overview

Curriculum Focus: Analysing and Managing Places

In Years 5–6, students become more complex, critical, analytical and evaluative in their thinking. They are increasingly aware of their wider community, and are learning to take on individual and group responsibilities. The curriculum focus is on analysing and managing places, and students should be involved in at least one investigation of a local environmental, social or planning issue and how it is managed.

Their study of places near and far continues to expand, to those well beyond their immediate experience. They learn that places can be described and classified by their functions, gain a more complex view of how places are connected, and explore how to explain their characteristics. In Year 6 the study of scale shifts to the global, with an initial investigation of the distribution of the world’s population, wealth and health. In their studies of the environment, students build their knowledge of weather into the concept of climate and its influence, and are introduced to the concept of environmental sustainability. Climate and weather are also considered in a study of bushfires and their management.

Specific geographical skills in Years 5-6 continue to build upon the skills introduced in the early years and throughout Years 3-4. They also include interpreting spatial distribution, and developing and interpreting graphs and charts related to climate and weather.

Lesson Structure

The equivalent of one Term will be dedicated to the study of Geography. In Year 5 and 6 the study of Geography will use inquiry and higher order thinking to discover their world. Models, maps and dioramas will be developed so display deep knowledge and understandings. Students will use geography language to describe their constructions, diagrams, maps and written work.

Geography emphasises inquiry-based learning and teaching, and opportunities for student-led questioning and investigation should be provided at all stages of schooling. The curriculum should also provide opportunities for fieldwork at all stages, as this is an essential component of geographical learning. Fieldwork is any study undertaken outside the classroom, and could be within the school grounds, around the neighbouring streets, or in more distant locations. These teaching and learning methods should be supported by forms of assessment that enable students to demonstrate their ability to think geographically and apply geographical skills.

Scope and Sequence

  Year 5 and 6 – Geography Scope and Sequence
  Term 1 Term 2 Term 3 Term 4
Year 5 Climate and Activities – We live in a world where the changing environment affects us
Year 6 Going Global –Environments are changing and we need to take responsibility for their sustainability

Year 5

Big Idea: Climate and activities

The Year 5 curriculum for geography has a focus on building students’ ability to explain their world in a geographic way. It requires increased critical and analytical thinking. Students consider contemporary places and the functions they serve. This builds on their spatial knowledge of Australia in Year 4, by analysing the spatial distribution of human populations and activities, such as retailing and tourism at national and regional levels. The environmental theme is extended from earlier studies of weather into the idea of climate. Students discuss contemporary sustainability issues. The Inquiry and Skills strand builds on students’ analytical, decision-making and evaluation skills. They draw conclusions on issues and consider different viewpoints when thinking about what could or should happen in the future. Students reflect on the effectiveness of their inquiry, how their thinking is different to that of others and how it has changed as a result of their learning.

 

Year 6

Big Idea: Going Global

In the Year 6 curriculum for geography, students are immersed in considering place, space and environment through a global lens. Students begin to explore the connections between places and the impacts of these connections. Study of space also becomes global increasing students’ knowledge of places throughout the world and introduces them to some of the fundamental inequalities and differences across the world. The Inquiry and Skills strand builds students’ analytical, decision-making and evaluation skills. They draw conclusions on issues and consider different viewpoints when thinking about what could or should happen in the future. Students reflect on the effectiveness of their inquiry and how their thinking is different to that of others and has changed as a result of their learning.

Assessment

The teaching and learning methods outlined under ‘lesson structure’ will be supported by forms of assessment that enable students to demonstrate their ability to think geographically and apply geographical skills. This will include:

  • The construction of models, diagrams, maps, graphs
  • Written work
  • Oral presentation
  • Peer assessment

Resources

No particular resources have been purchased. When staff are selected they will ascertain appropriate resources both in hard and electronic copies. The Australian Curriculum Geography Content Descriptors and Elaborations will provide staff with information when programming.

Australian Curriculum Achievement Standards

By the end of Year 5, students analyse the different uses and functions of land in different places and at different scales. They reflect on sustainability to describe the features of a variety of places and explain how communities provide services and manage places. They describe patterns in human activities and explain how they have changed over time. They describe the relationships between climate and environments and human activity. Students evaluate the sustainability of a range of human activities and generate and justify a plan for action.

Students select geographical questions that range in complexity to guide an inquiry. They identify and use a variety of geographical information sources to gather information or data and judge the validity of these sources. When investigating, they identify and use appropriate materials, geographical tools and skills and equipment and manage the data they collect to identify patterns and relationships. They combine their data and information to draw conclusions.

When communicating their conclusions to a range of audiences, they select and use appropriate geographical tools and geographical vocabulary.

PE & Health

Reception to Year 2

Overview

H & PE at Garden College attempts to provide students with knowledge, understanding and skills to allow them to enhance their own and others’ health and wellbeing in varied and changing contexts. Integral to H & PE is the acquisition of movement skills, concepts and strategies that enable students to confidently and competently participate in a range of physical activities.

 

The curriculum in Reception/Foundation to Year 2 focuses on developing the knowledge, understanding, and skills that support students to be healthy, safe, and active individuals who can move competently and confidently in a range of physical spaces and on diverse surfaces.

The health contexts explored in the Reception/Foundation to Year 2 curriculum include, but are not limited to:

  • Safe use of medicines
  • Food and nutrition
  • Health benefits of physical activity

The movement and physical activity contexts that students will experience in the Reception/Foundation to Year 2 curriculum include, but are not limited to :

  • Active play and minor games
  • Fundamental movement skills
  • Rhythmic and expressive movement.

Lesson Structure

H & PE lessons are conducted in both indoor and outdoor settings with an emphasis on teamwork and control over body movements. Students are taught specific movements as a powerful medium for a range of personal, interpersonal, behavioural, social and cognitive skills. Students gain expertise in movement skills, physical activities and physical fitness through a range of games and activities.

Scope and Sequence

A Perceptual Motor Skills Program is to be implemented during Reception PE lessons and aims to develop students’ motor skills that are foundational skills for many activities in the classroom. The PMP aims to allow students to practice these skills in a fun, holistic and organized way through movement awareness, bean bag and rope play, ball handling activities, basic athletics and basic gymnastics throughout the year.

 

Staff when appointed will select the topics for study for each term.

Reception to Year 2 – Health & Physical Education Scope and Sequence
  Term 1 Term 2 Term 3 Term 4
Health Contexts
Movement and Physical Activity

 

Assessment

Assessment includes:

  • Checklists
  • Anecdotal notes

Resources

A range of equipment including soft and hard balls, skipping ropes, hoops, bean bags, bats, athletic equipment are used regularly during H & PE lessons, depending on the nature and focus of each lesson.

Benchmarks and Recommendations

Due to Occupational Health and Safety (OH & S) requirements, students are required to wear sports shoes and the appropriate uniform during H & PE lessons. It is also recommended that students have their water bottles with them during H & PE lessons, especially during terms 1 and 4. Garden College’s has a Sun Smart Policy, students are required to wear their hats or visors during outdoor H & PE lessons.

Reception/Foundation achievement standard

By the end of Reception/Foundation Year, students recognise how their body is growing and changing. They also recognise the important people in their lives who help them be healthy, safe, and physically active every day. They identify how to move and play safely, and are able to describe how their body responds to movement. 
Students demonstrate how to express different emotions, and the personal and social skills to include others in a range of activities. With guidance, they demonstrate healthy and safe practices in classroom and movement situations, and are able to demonstrate help-seeking strategies. They perform a range of fundamental movement skills with increasing confidence and competence in physical play, modified games, and rhythmic and expressive activities.

Years 1 and 2 Achievement Standard

By the end of Year 2, students identify their personal strengths and achievements, and describe the different changes that occur as they grow older. They explore the differences and diversity of individuals and groups, and are able to ask for help if they need it. They describe how the body reacts to physical activity and explain how healthy eating and being active keeps them well. 
Students demonstrate positive ways to interact with others, and select and apply strategies to keep them healthy and safe. They demonstrate a broad range of fundamental movement skills including sequencing and using equipment in play, games and in response to a variety of stimuli.

Years 3 – 6

Overview

H & PE at Garden College attempts to provide students with knowledge, understanding and skills to allow them to enhance their own and others’ health and wellbeing in varied and changing contexts. Integral to H & PE is the acquisition of movement skills, concepts and strategies that enable students to confidently and competently participate in a range of physical activities.

As students move through primary school, the focus broadens also to include the knowledge, understanding, and skills necessary to support and enhance their own health and wellbeing and that of their family and friends. Students are increasingly connected to their world and their peers. Personal and social skills take on an increasing importance, and students become more aware of gender expectations and stereotypes. They look to family, peers, the media, the Internet, and the community for role models. Students in Years 3–6 further develop and refine their fundamental movement skills, learn about the common features of games and expand their understanding of movement strategies and different tactical solutions to increase their sense of success in physical activities.

The Health and Physical Education curriculum in Year 3 to Year 6 provides explicit learning opportunities to develop the communication skills, social skills and behaviours needed to work effectively with others in a range of environments and contexts. The health contexts explored in Years 3 to 6 include, but are not limited to:

  • alcohol and drugs
  • Food and nutrition
  • Health benefits of physical activity
  • Mental health and wellbeing
  • Relationships and sexuality (from Year 5)

The curriculum allows students to experience a range of movement activities, to develop further movement competence and confidence. It also supports and encourages lifelong physical activity participation. The movement and physical activity contexts that students will experience in Years 3 to 6 include, but are not limited to:

  • Active play and minor games
  • Challenge and adventure activities
  • Fundamental movement skills
  • Games and sports
  • Health-related physical activities
  • Rhythmic and expressive movement activities.

Lesson Structure

H & PE lessons are conducted in both indoor and outdoor settings with an emphasis on teamwork and control over body movements. Students are taught specific movements as a powerful medium for a range of personal, interpersonal, behavioural, social and cognitive skills. Students gain expertise in movement skills, physical activities and physical fitness through a range of games and activities.

Scope and Sequence

In Years 3 to 6, students perform a broad range of complex motor skills. They demonstrate a wide variety of motor skills and apply them to basic, sport-specific situations. They create and perform coordinated movement sequences that contain a variety of motor skills and movement patterns. They participate regularly in physical activities for the purpose of improving skill and health, and identify and describe the components of health-related fitness as well as healthy eating choices that contribute to well being.

 

Staff when appointed will select the topics for study for each term.

Year 3 to Year 4 – Health & Physical Education Scope and Sequence
  Term 1 Term 2 Term 3 Term 4
Health Contexts
Movement and Physical Activity

Assessment

Assessment includes:

  • Checklists
  • Anecdotal notes

Resources

A range of equipment including soft and hard balls, skipping ropes, hoops, bean bags, bats, athletic equipment are used regularly during H & PE lessons, depending on the nature and focus of each lesson.

Benchmarks and Recommendations

Due to Occupational Health and Safety (OH & S) requirements, students are required to wear sports shoes and the appropriate uniform during H & PE lessons. It is also recommended that students have their water bottles with them during H & PE lessons, especially during terms 1 and 4. Garden College’s has a Sun Smart Policy and students are required to wear their hats or visors during outdoor H & PE lessons.

Years 3 and 4 Achievement Standard

By the end of Year 4, students describe the connections they have to their community and identify resources available locally to support their health, physical activity, and wellbeing. They examine factors that shape identity and beliefs, and are able to discuss the influences on healthy and safe choices. They understand the benefits of physical activity and are able to apply rules fairly in a range of situations. 
Students demonstrate decision-making and problem-solving skills when finding solutions to health and movement challenges. They suggest and apply a range of strategies for working cooperatively with others to achieve a goal, and for staying safe and healthy in a range of situations. They create and perform movement sequences using a variety of movement skills and patterns.

Years 5 and 6 Achievement Standard

By the end of Year 6, students investigate the perspectives of others and discuss how a range of factors influences how people co-exist. They describe their own and others’ contributions to health, physical activity and wellbeing and identify a range of appropriate ways to respond to successes and challenges. They access and interpret health and physical activity information from a variety of sources and identify a range of places where they can seek help to enhance their health and wellbeing. They understand and apply movement concepts and elements of movement to a variety of physical activities, and describe the key features of health related fitness. 
Students demonstrate strategies that enable diverse groups to work together. They apply effective decision making and problem solving skills in health and movement contexts. They demonstrate and refine a range of movement skills and perform them with increasing accuracy and control in a variety of physical activities. They apply and refine movement concepts and strategies in more complex games, sports, and activities.

Year 6

Overview

H & PE at Garden College attempts to provide students with knowledge, understanding and skills to allow them to enhance their own and others’ health and wellbeing in varied and changing contexts. Integral to H & PE is the acquisition of movement skills, concepts and strategies that enable students to confidently and competently participate in a range of physical activities.

Lesson Structure

H & PE lessons are conducted in both indoor and outdoor settings with an emphasis on teamwork and control over body movements. Students are taught specific movements as a powerful medium for a range of personal, interpersonal, behavioural, social and cognitive skills. Students gain expertise in movement skills, physical activities and physical fitness through a range of games and activities.

Scope and Sequence

In Year 6, students refine and expand their range of skills, and perform them with increasing precision, accuracy and control in more complex movements, sequences and games. Students begin to observe, and give constructive feedback on, the skill performance of their peers.

As students continue to participate in regular periods of moderate to vigorous physical activity, they explore the training principles for improving components of health related fitness and ways to monitor exercise intensity.

 

Table to be developed by staff in 2014.

Assessment

Assessment includes:

  • Checklists
  • Anecdotal notes

Resources

A range of equipment including soft and hard balls, skipping ropes, hoops, bean bags, bats, athletic equipment are used regularly during H & PE lessons, depending on the nature and focus of each lesson.

Benchmarks and Recommendations

Due to Occupational Health and Safety (OH & S) requirements, students are required to wear sports shoes and the appropriate uniform during H & PE lessons. It is also recommended that students have their water bottles with them during H & PE lessons, especially during terms 1 and 4. Garden College’s has Sun Smart Policy and students are required to wear their hats or visors during outdoor H & PE lessons.

 

SACSA framework Health and PE Standard 3

Physical Activity and Participation

  • Demonstrates a range of specialised and individual and team movement skills that enhance their sense of personal and group identity
  • Develops, through participation in health-related fitness activities, an understanding of those activities appropriateness and effectiveness

Personal and Social Development

  • Explains how different ways of describing people influences the way people value and treat themselves and others
  • Identifies physical, social and emotional changes associated with their growth and development, and appreciates differences between people of the same age
  • Assumes different roles when working as part of a cooperative group or team to achieve a shared goal and understands the effects on relationships

Health of Individuals and Communities

  • Analyses a variety of community health issues that affect the and investigates community programs to address them
  • Identifies skills to deal with situations that pose a risk to their health and safety
  • Researches and shares findings about issues related to why individuals and groups have different eating patterns

 

See – ACARA Health and Physical Education draft curriculum for national consultation – Dec 2012

http://www.achpersa.com.au/

Some other useful information I found

Here are the motor skills, movement patterns, and movement concepts our program stresses:

  • Locomotor Skills:
  • Running, Shuffling, Skipping, Hopping, Leaping, Crawling, Chasing, Fleeing
  • Body Management:
  • Balance, Jumping/Landing, Weight Transfer
  • Manipulatives:
    • Throwing, Catching, Rolling, Hand Dribbling, Foot Dribbling, Foot Passing
    • Rhythm:
    • Jumping Rope (Individual and Double Dutch), Hula Hoop
  • Cooperatives:
    • Pairs, Small group activities
  • Fitness:
    • Strength Training, Cardiovascular Fitness, Flexibility (Stretching)
  • Spatial Awareness:
    • Personal Space, General Space, Boundaries, Levels of Movement
  • Concepts:
    • Agility, Uses feedback to improve performance, correct form for motor skills
Islamic Studies

Year-Reception (FOUNDATION)

Overview

Quran classes aim to teach students to read, memorise as well as translate. Students progress from gaining familiarity with Arabic and primary level reading (Level 1-4) up through to fluent reading (Level 5 to Quran). Students are taught to read Arabic text of the Holy Qur’an while applying the “Rules of Recitation (Tajweed)” by use of the rules of pause, alteration of the letter, thin sound vs. broad sound, and nasalization. Students memorise selected Surats from the last Juzz of the Holy Qur’an (Juzz Amma). Students also gain a general understanding of the meaning of some verses they are studying and they relate the Qur’an to their lives by analysing stories in the Qur’an, historical incidents and the moral lessons to be learned.

Lesson Structure

In Quran lessons students are in 2 groups, with the first group reading between the levels of 1-4, while the second group referring to students reading from Level to Quran.

Scope and Sequence

The methodology of teaching Quran at Garden College is through a program which is designed into Five (5) levels that help students to acquire Quran education gradually and consistently. For Year Reception only, Iqra Series Books are used to support students. Depending on student’s progress and achievement, the classroom teacher may also begin to use “Alif Ba An Easy Guide In Learning the Holy Quran” as well.

Level 1 Beginners —> Alif Ba Book   Unit 1-5 and

Level 2 Intermediate —> Alif Ba Book   Unit 6-9

Level 3 Upper Intermediate —> Alif Ba Book   Unit 10-13

Level 4 Advanced —> Alif Ba Book   Unit 14-17

Level 5 Upper Advanced —> Alif Ba Book   Unit 18Quran

 

 

Primary Quran Memorisation Benchmark

N Surats N Surats
1 AL-FATIHA 20 AT-TIN
2 ANASS 21 ASHARH
3 AL-FALAQ 22 ADUHAA
4 AL-IKHLASS 23 AL-LAYL
5 AL-MASSAD 24 ASHAMS
6 AN-NASR 25 AL-BALAD
7 AL-KAFIRUN 26 AL-FAJR
8 AL-KAWTHAR 27 AL-GHASHIYA
9 AL-MAUN 28 AL-AALA
10 QURAISH 29 ATARIK
11 AL-FEEL 30 AL-BURUJ
12 AL-HUMAZA 31 AL-INSHIQAQ
13 AL-ASR 32 AL-MUTAFEFEN
14 ATTAKATHUR 33 AL-INFITAR
15 AL-QARIAH 34 ATAKWIR
16 AL-ADYAT 35 ABASSA
17 AZ-ZALZALA 36 AN-NAZIAT
18 AL-BAYNAH 37 AN-NABA
19 AL-QADR
20 AL-AALAQ

 

Assessment

Assessment during Quran lessons are mainly informal and include:

  • Diagnostic assessment whilst listening to students
  • Anecdotal notes
  • Checklists

Resources

Other Resources referenced and used during Quran classes include:

  • Quran Holy Book
  • Quran CD
  • Iqra Series Books (1-6) / Alif Ba Book
  • Quran Video, Interactive Whiteboard, Ipads
  • Classroom Audio System
  • Internet Web Quran @: Tanzil.net / Reciter.Org / Garden College Website.

Benchmarks & Recommendations

After being tested by the teacher, students are given tailored homework for the next Quran lesson. Parents are advised to check their child’s Quran Folder and their timetable for the next Quran lesson and make sure the given homework is completed and the Quran folder signed.

Students are to read Quran every day. For optimum results Insha Allah, 2 sessions are recommended. Please make sure that the following are available:

  • A quiet area where your child can listen to Quran from CD’s or Quran Web.(Please avoid any disturbing sound when listening to Quran).
  • A CD player system with head phones.
  • Quran Book (If he/she can read) to be able to follow the reciter.
  • Allow Two (2) sessions a day, Morning and Afternoon 30 minutes each.

Better results can be obtained if sessions are consistently conducted in the morning before school time and in the evening.

Year 1

Overview

Quran classes aim to teach students to read, memorise as well as translate. Students progress from gaining familiarity with Arabic and primary level reading (Level 1-4) up through to fluent reading (Level 5 to Quran). Students are taught to read Arabic text of the Holy Qur’an while applying the “Rules of Recitation (Tajweed)” by use of the rules of pause, alteration of the letter, thin sound vs. broad sound, and nasalization. Students memorise selected Surats from the last Juzz of the Holy Qur’an (Juzz Amma). Students also gain a general understanding of the meaning of some verses they are studying and they relate the Qur’an to their lives by analysing stories in the Qur’an, historical incidents and the moral lessons to be learned.

Lesson Structure

In Quran lessons students are in 2 groups, with the first group reading between the levels of 1-4, while the second group referring to students reading from Level to Quran.

Scope and Sequence

The methodology of teaching Quran at Garden College is through a program which is designed into Five (5) levels that help students to acquire Quran education gradually and consistently. For Year Reception only, Iqra Series Books are used to support students. Depending on student’s progress and achievement, the classroom teacher may also begin to use “Alif Ba An Easy Guide In Learning the Holy Quran” as well.

Level 1 Beginners —> Alif Ba Book   Unit 1-5 and

Level 2 Intermediate —> Alif Ba Book   Unit 6-9

Level 3 Upper Intermediate —> Alif Ba Book   Unit 10-13

Level 4 Advanced —> Alif Ba Book   Unit 14-17

Level 5 Upper Advanced —> Alif Ba Book   Unit 18Quran

 

 

Primary Quran Memorisation Benchmark

N Surats N Surats
1 AL-FATIHA 20 AT-TIN
2 ANASS 21 ASHARH
3 AL-FALAQ 22 ADUHAA
4 AL-IKHLASS 23 AL-LAYL
5 AL-MASSAD 24 ASHAMS
6 AN-NASR 25 AL-BALAD
7 AL-KAFIRUN 26 AL-FAJR
8 AL-KAWTHAR 27 AL-GHASHIYA
9 AL-MAUN 28 AL-AALA
10 QURAISH 29 ATARIK
11 AL-FEEL 30 AL-BURUJ
12 AL-HUMAZA 31 AL-INSHIQAQ
13 AL-ASR 32 AL-MUTAFEFEN
14 ATTAKATHUR 33 AL-INFITAR
15 AL-QARIAH 34 ATAKWIR
16 AL-ADYAT 35 ABASSA
17 AZ-ZALZALA 36 AN-NAZIAT
18 AL-BAYNAH 37 AN-NABA
19 AL-QADR
20 AL-AALAQ

 

Assessment

Assessment during Quran lessons are mainly informal and include:

  • Diagnostic assessment whilst listening to students
  • Anecdotal notes
  • Checklists

Resources

Other Resources referenced and used during Quran classes include:

  • Quran Holy Book
  • Quran CD
  • Iqra Series Books (1-6) / Alif Ba Book
  • Quran Video, Interactive Whiteboard, Ipads
  • Classroom Audio System
  • Internet Web Quran @: Tanzil.net / Reciter.Org / Garden College Website.

Benchmarks & Recommendations

After being tested by the teacher, students are given tailored homework for the next Quran lesson. Parents are advised to check their child’s Quran Folder and their time table for the next Quran lesson and make sure the given homework is completed and the Quran folder signed.

Students are to read Quran every day. For optimum results Insha Allah, 2 sessions are recommended. Please make sure that the following are available:

  • A quiet area where your child can listen to Quran from CD’s or Quran Web.(Please avoid any disturbing sound when listening to Quran).
  • A CD player system with head phones.
  • Quran Book (If he/she can read) to be able to follow the reciter.
  • Allow Two (2) sessions a day, Morning and Afternoon 30 minutes each.

Better results can be obtained if sessions are consistently conducted in the morning before school time and in the evening.

Year 2

Overview

Quran classes aim to teach students to read, memorise as well as translate. Students progress from gaining familiarity with Arabic and primary level reading (Level 1-4) up through to fluent reading (Level 5 to Quran). Students are taught to read Arabic text of the Holy Qur’an while applying the “Rules of Recitation (Tajweed)” by use of the rules of pause, alteration of the letter, thin sound vs. broad sound, and nasalization. Students memorise selected Surats from the last Juzz of the Holy Qur’an (Juzz Amma). Students also gain a general understanding of the meaning of some verses they are studying and they relate the Qur’an to their lives by analysing stories in the Qur’an, historical incidents and the moral lessons to be learned.

Lesson Structure

In Quran lessons students are in 2 groups, with the first group reading between the levels of 1-4, while the second group referring to students reading from Level to Quran.

Scope and Sequence

The methodology of teaching Quran at Garden College is through a program which is designed into Five (5) levels that help students to acquire Quran education gradually and consistently. For Reception only, Iqra Series Books are used to support students. Depending on student’s progress and achievement, the classroom teacher may also begin to use “Alif Ba An Easy Guide In Learning the Holy Quran” as well.

Level 1 Beginners —> Alif Ba Book   Unit 1-5 and

Level 2 Intermediate —> Alif Ba Book   Unit 6-9

Level 3 Upper Intermediate —> Alif Ba Book   Unit 10-13

Level 4 Advanced —> Alif Ba Book   Unit 14-17

Level 5 Upper Advanced —> Alif Ba Book   Unit 18Quran

 

 

Primary Quran Memorisation Benchmark

N Surats N Surats
1 AL-FATIHA 20 AT-TIN
2 ANASS 21 ASHARH
3 AL-FALAQ 22 ADUHAA
4 AL-IKHLASS 23 AL-LAYL
5 AL-MASSAD 24 ASHAMS
6 AN-NASR 25 AL-BALAD
7 AL-KAFIRUN 26 AL-FAJR
8 AL-KAWTHAR 27 AL-GHASHIYA
9 AL-MAUN 28 AL-AALA
10 QURAISH 29 ATARIK
11 AL-FEEL 30 AL-BURUJ
12 AL-HUMAZA 31 AL-INSHIQAQ
13 AL-ASR 32 AL-MUTAFEFEN
14 ATTAKATHUR 33 AL-INFITAR
15 AL-QARIAH 34 ATAKWIR
16 AL-ADYAT 35 ABASSA
17 AZ-ZALZALA 36 AN-NAZIAT
18 AL-BAYNAH 37 AN-NABA
19 AL-QADR
20 AL-AALAQ

 

Assessment

Assessment during Quran lessons are mainly informal and include:

  • Diagnostic assessment whilst listening to students
  • Anecdotal notes
  • Checklists

Resources

Other Resources referenced and used during Quran classes include:

  • Quran Holy Book
  • Quran CD
  • Iqra Series Books (1-6) / Alif Ba Book
  • Quran Video, Interactive Whiteboard, Ipads
  • Classroom Audio System
  • Internet Web Quran @: Tanzil.net / Reciter.Org / Garden College Website.

Benchmarks & Recommendations

After being tested by the teacher, students are given tailored homework for the next Quran lesson. Parents are advised to check their child’s Quran Folder and their timetable for the next Quran lesson and make sure the given homework is completed and the Quran folder signed.

Students are to read Quran every day. For optimum results Insha Allah, 2 sessions are recommended. Please make sure that the following are available:

  • A quiet area where your child can listen to Quran from CD’s or Quran Web.(Please avoid any disturbing sound when listening to Quran).
  • A CD player system with head phones.
  • Quran Book (If he/she can read) to be able to follow the reciter.
  • Allow Two (2) sessions a day, Morning and Afternoon 30 minutes each.

Better results can be obtained if sessions are consistently conducted in the morning before school time and in the evening.

Year 3

Overview

Quran classes aim to teach students to read, memorise as well as translate. Students progress from gaining familiarity with Arabic and primary level reading (Level 1-4) up through to fluent reading (Level 5 to Quran). Students are taught to read Arabic text of the Holy Qur’an while applying the “Rules of Recitation (Tajweed)” by use of the rules of pause, alteration of the letter, thin sound vs. broad sound, and nasalization. Students memorise selected Surats from the last Juzz of the Holy Qur’an (Juzz Amma). Students also gain a general understanding of the meaning of some verses they are studying and they relate the Qur’an to their lives by analysing stories in the Qur’an, historical incidents and the moral lessons to be learned.

Lesson Structure

In Quran students are in 2 groups, with the first group reading between the levels of 1-4, while the second group referring to students reading from Level to Quran.

Scope and Sequence

The methodology of teaching Quran at Garden College is through a program which is designed into Five (5) levels that help students to acquire Quran education gradually and consistently. For Reception students only, Iqra Series Books are used to support students. Depending on student’s progress and achievement, the classroom teacher may also begin to use “Alif Ba An Easy Guide In Learning the Holy Quran” as well.

Level 1 Beginners —> Alif Ba Book   Unit 1-5 and

Level 2 Intermediate —> Alif Ba Book   Unit 6-9

Level 3 Upper Intermediate —> Alif Ba Book   Unit 10-13

Level 4 Advanced —> Alif Ba Book   Unit 14-17

Level 5 Upper Advanced —> Alif Ba Book   Unit 18Quran

 

 

Primary Quran Memorisation Benchmark

N Surats N Surats
1 AL-FATIHA 20 AT-TIN
2 ANASS 21 ASHARH
3 AL-FALAQ 22 ADUHAA
4 AL-IKHLASS 23 AL-LAYL
5 AL-MASSAD 24 ASHAMS
6 AN-NASR 25 AL-BALAD
7 AL-KAFIRUN 26 AL-FAJR
8 AL-KAWTHAR 27 AL-GHASHIYA
9 AL-MAUN 28 AL-AALA
10 QURAISH 29 ATARIK
11 AL-FEEL 30 AL-BURUJ
12 AL-HUMAZA 31 AL-INSHIQAQ
13 AL-ASR 32 AL-MUTAFEFEN
14 ATTAKATHUR 33 AL-INFITAR
15 AL-QARIAH 34 ATAKWIR
16 AL-ADYAT 35 ABASSA
17 AZ-ZALZALA 36 AN-NAZIAT
18 AL-BAYNAH 37 AN-NABA
19 AL-QADR
20 AL-AALAQ

 

Assessment

Assessment during Quran lessons are mainly informal and include:

  • Diagnostic assessment whilst listening to students
  • Anecdotal notes
  • Checklists

Resources

Other Resources referenced and used during Quran classes include:

  • Quran Holy Book
  • Quran CD
  • Iqra Series Books (1-6) / Alif Ba Book
  • Quran Video, Interactive Whiteboard, Ipads
  • Classroom Audio System
  • Internet Web Quran @: Tanzil.net / Reciter.Org / Garden College Website.

 

Benchmarks & Recommendations

After being tested by the teacher, students are given tailored homework for the next Quran lesson. Parents are advised to check their child’s Quran Folder and their timetable for the next Quran lesson and make sure the given homework is completed and the Quran folder signed.

Students are to read Quran every day. For optimum results Insha Allah, 2 sessions are recommended. Please make sure that the following are available:

  • A quiet area where your child can listen to Quran from CD’s or Quran Web.(Please avoid any disturbing sound when listening to Quran).
  • A CD player system with head phones.
  • Quran Book (If he/she can read) to be able to follow the reciter.
  • Allow Two (2) sessions a day, Morning and Afternoon 30 minutes each.

Better results can be obtained if sessions are consistently conducted in the morning before school time and in the evening.

Year 4

Overview

Quran classes aim to teach students to read, memorise as well as translate. Students progress from gaining familiarity with Arabic and primary level reading (Level 1-4) up through to fluent reading (Level 5 to Quran). Students are taught to read Arabic text of the Holy Qur’an while applying the “Rules of Recitation (Tajweed)” by use of the rules of pause, alteration of the letter, thin sound vs. broad sound, and nasalization. Students memorise selected Surats from the last Juzz of the Holy Qur’an (Juzz Amma). Students also gain a general understanding of the meaning of some verses they are studying and they relate the Qur’an to their lives by analysing stories in the Qur’an, historical incidents and the moral lessons to be learned.

Lesson Structure

In Quran lessons students are in 2 groups, with the first group reading between the levels of 1-4, while the second group referring to students reading from Level to Quran.

Scope and Sequence

The methodology of teaching Quran at Garden College is through a program which is designed into Five (5) levels that help students to acquire Quran education gradually and consistently. For Reception students only, Iqra Series Books are used to support students. Depending on student’s progress and achievement, the classroom teacher may also begin to use “Alif Ba An Easy Guide In Learning the Holy Quran” as well.

Level 1 Beginners —> Alif Ba Book   Unit 1-5 and

Level 2 Intermediate —> Alif Ba Book   Unit 6-9

Level 3 Upper Intermediate —> Alif Ba Book   Unit 10-13

Level 4 Advanced —> Alif Ba Book   Unit 14-17

Level 5 Upper Advanced —> Alif Ba Book   Unit 18Quran

 

 

Primary Quran Memorisation Benchmark

N Surats N Surats
1 AL-FATIHA 20 AT-TIN
2 ANASS 21 ASHARH
3 AL-FALAQ 22 ADUHAA
4 AL-IKHLASS 23 AL-LAYL
5 AL-MASSAD 24 ASHAMS
6 AN-NASR 25 AL-BALAD
7 AL-KAFIRUN 26 AL-FAJR
8 AL-KAWTHAR 27 AL-GHASHIYA
9 AL-MAUN 28 AL-AALA
10 QURAISH 29 ATARIK
11 AL-FEEL 30 AL-BURUJ
12 AL-HUMAZA 31 AL-INSHIQAQ
13 AL-ASR 32 AL-MUTAFEFEN
14 ATTAKATHUR 33 AL-INFITAR
15 AL-QARIAH 34 ATAKWIR
16 AL-ADYAT 35 ABASSA
17 AZ-ZALZALA 36 AN-NAZIAT
18 AL-BAYNAH 37 AN-NABA
19 AL-QADR
20 AL-AALAQ

Assessment

Assessment during Quran lessons are mainly informal and include:

  • Diagnostic assessment whilst listening to students
  • Anecdotal notes
  • Checklists

Resources

Other Resources referenced and used during Quran classes include:

  • Quran Holy Book
  • Quran CD
  • Iqra Series Books (1-6) / Alif Ba Book
  • Quran Video, Interactive Whiteboard, Ipads
  • Classroom Audio System
  • Internet Web Quran @: Tanzil.net / Reciter.Org / Garden College Website.

 

Benchmarks & Recommendations

After being tested by the teacher, students are given tailored homework for the next Quran lesson. Parents are advised to check their child’s Quran Folder and their timetable for the next Quran lesson and make sure the given homework is completed and the Quran folder signed.

Students are to read Quran every day. For optimum results Insha Allah, 2 sessions are recommended. Please make sure that the following are available:

  • A quiet area where your child can listen to Quran from CD’s or Quran Web.(Please avoid any disturbing sound when listening to Quran).
  • A CD player system with head phones.
  • Quran Book (If he/she can read) to be able to follow the reciter.
  • Allow Two (2) sessions a day, Morning and Afternoon 30 minutes each.

Better results can be obtained if sessions are consistently conducted in the morning before school time and in the evening.

Year 5

Overview

Quran classes aim to teach students to read, memorise as well as translate. Students progress from gaining familiarity with Arabic and primary level reading (Level 1-4) up through to fluent reading (Level 5 to Quran). Students are taught to read Arabic text of the Holy Qur’an while applying the “Rules of Recitation (Tajweed)” by use of the rules of pause, alteration of the letter, thin sound vs. broad sound, and nasalization. Students memorise selected Surats from the last Juzz of the Holy Qur’an (Juzz Amma). Students also gain a general understanding of the meaning of some verses they are studying and they relate the Qur’an to their lives by analysing stories in the Qur’an, historical incidents and the moral lessons to be learned.

Lesson Structure

In Quran lessons students are in 2 groups, with the first group reading between the levels of 1-4, while the second group referring to students reading from Level to Quran.

Scope and Sequence

The methodology of teaching Quran at Garden College is through a program which is designed into Five (5) levels that help students to acquire Quran education gradually and consistently. For Year Reception only, Iqra Series Books are used to support students. Depending on student’s progress and achievement, the classroom teacher may also begin to use “Alif Ba An Easy Guide In Learning the Holy Quran” as well.

Level 1 Beginners —> Alif Ba Book   Unit 1-5 and

Level 2 Intermediate —> Alif Ba Book   Unit 6-9

Level 3 Upper Intermediate —> Alif Ba Book   Unit 10-13

Level 4 Advanced —> Alif Ba Book   Unit 14-17

Level 5 Upper Advanced —> Alif Ba Book   Unit 18Quran

 

 

 

Primary Quran Memorisation Benchmark

N Surats N Surats
1 AL-FATIHA 20 AT-TIN
2 ANASS 21 ASHARH
3 AL-FALAQ 22 ADUHAA
4 AL-IKHLASS 23 AL-LAYL
5 AL-MASSAD 24 ASHAMS
6 AN-NASR 25 AL-BALAD
7 AL-KAFIRUN 26 AL-FAJR
8 AL-KAWTHAR 27 AL-GHASHIYA
9 AL-MAUN 28 AL-AALA
10 QURAISH 29 ATARIK
11 AL-FEEL 30 AL-BURUJ
12 AL-HUMAZA 31 AL-INSHIQAQ
13 AL-ASR 32 AL-MUTAFEFEN
14 ATTAKATHUR 33 AL-INFITAR
15 AL-QARIAH 34 ATAKWIR
16 AL-ADYAT 35 ABASSA
17 AZ-ZALZALA 36 AN-NAZIAT
18 AL-BAYNAH 37 AN-NABA
19 AL-QADR
20 AL-AALAQ

Assessment

Assessment during Quran lessons are mainly informal and include:

  • Diagnostic assessment whilst listening to students
  • Anecdotal notes
  • Checklists

Resources

Other Resources referenced and used during Quran classes include:

  • Quran Holy Book
  • Quran CD
  • Iqra Series Books (1-6) / Alif Ba Book
  • Quran Video, Interactive Whiteboard, Ipads
  • Classroom Audio System
  • Internet Web Quran @: Tanzil.net / Reciter.Org / Garden College Website.

 

 

Benchmarks & Recommendations

After being tested by the teacher, students are given tailored homework for the next Quran lesson. Parents are advised to check their child’s Quran Folder and their timetable for the next Quran lesson and make sure the given homework is completed and the Quran folder signed.

Students are to read Quran every day. For optimum results Insha Allah, 2 sessions are recommended. Please make sure that the following are available:

  • A quiet area where your child can listen to Quran from CD’s or Quran Web.(Please avoid any disturbing sound when listening to Quran).
  • A CD player system with head phones.
  • Quran Book (If he/she can read) to be able to follow the reciter.
  • Allow Two (2) sessions a day, Morning and Afternoon 30 minutes each.

Better results can be obtained if sessions are consistently conducted in the morning before school time and in the evening.

Year 6

Overview

Quran classes aim to teach students to read, memorise as well as translate. Students progress from gaining familiarity with Arabic and primary level reading (Level 1-4) up through to fluent reading (Level 5 to Quran). Students are taught to read Arabic text of the Holy Qur’an while applying the “Rules of Recitation (Tajweed)” by use of the rules of pause, alteration of the letter, thin sound vs. broad sound, and nasalization. Students memorise selected Surats from the last Juzz of the Holy Qur’an (Juzz Amma). Students also gain a general understanding of the meaning of some verses they are studying and they relate the Qur’an to their lives by analysing stories in the Qur’an, historical incidents and the moral lessons to be learned.

Lesson Structure

In Quran lessons students are in 2 groups, with the first group reading between the levels of 1-4, while the second group referring to students reading from Level to Quran.

Scope and Sequence

The methodology of teaching Quran at Garden College is through a program which is designed into Five (5) levels that help students to acquire Quran education gradually and consistently. For Year Reception only, Iqra Series Books are used to support students. Depending on student’s progress and achievement, the classroom teacher may also begin to use “Alif Ba An Easy Guide In Learning the Holy Quran” as well.

Level 1 Beginners —> Alif Ba Book   Unit 1-5 and

Level 2 Intermediate —> Alif Ba Book   Unit 6-9

Level 3 Upper Intermediate —> Alif Ba Book   Unit 10-13

Level 4 Advanced —> Alif Ba Book   Unit 14-17

Level 5 Upper Advanced —> Alif Ba Book   Unit 18Quran

 

Primary Quran Memorisation Benchmark

N Surats N Surats
1 AL-FATIHA 20 AT-TIN
2 ANASS 21 ASHARH
3 AL-FALAQ 22 ADUHAA
4 AL-IKHLASS 23 AL-LAYL
5 AL-MASSAD 24 ASHAMS
6 AN-NASR 25 AL-BALAD
7 AL-KAFIRUN 26 AL-FAJR
8 AL-KAWTHAR 27 AL-GHASHIYA
9 AL-MAUN 28 AL-AALA
10 QURAISH 29 ATARIK
11 AL-FEEL 30 AL-BURUJ
12 AL-HUMAZA 31 AL-INSHIQAQ
13 AL-ASR 32 AL-MUTAFEFEN
14 ATTAKATHUR 33 AL-INFITAR
15 AL-QARIAH 34 ATAKWIR
16 AL-ADYAT 35 ABASSA
17 AZ-ZALZALA 36 AN-NAZIAT
18 AL-BAYNAH 37 AN-NABA
19 AL-QADR
20 AL-AALAQ

Assessment

Assessment during Quran lessons are mainly informal and include:

  • Diagnostic assessment whilst listening to students
  • Anecdotal notes
  • Checklists

Resources

Other Resources referenced and used during Quran classes include:

  • Quran Holy Book
  • Quran CD
  • Iqra Series Books (1-6) / Alif Ba Book
  • Quran Video, Interactive Whiteboard, Ipads
  • Classroom Audio System
  • Internet Web Quran @: Tanzil.net / Reciter.Org / Garden College Website.

Benchmarks & Recommendations

After being tested by the teacher, students are given tailored homework for the next Quran lesson. Parents are advised to check their child’s Quran Folder and their timetable for the next Quran lesson and make sure the given homework is completed and the Quran folder signed.

Students are to read Quran every day. For optimum results Insha Allah, 2 sessions are recommended. Please make sure that the following are available:

  • A quiet area where your child can listen to Quran from CD’s or Quran Web.(Please avoid any disturbing sound when listening to Quran).
  • A CD player system with head phones.
  • Quran Book (If he/she can read) to be able to follow the reciter.
  • Allow Two (2) sessions a day, Morning and Afternoon 30 minutes each.

Better results can be obtained if sessions are consistently conducted in the morning before school time and in the evening.

Islamic Studies

Islam teaches that human beings have a moral obligation to live in harmony with one another. Islam also recognizes and accords rights to all human beings regardless of race, colour or creed. The Islamic Studies curriculum at Garden College aims to embed this understanding amongst students whilst teaching students the fundamental practices and obligations that all humans must observe, to be responsible and active Muslims in an ever changing society.

Reception

Overview

At Garden College, Islamic Studies lessons primarily aim to allow students to develop a deep understanding of who their creator is and his divine attributes. In addition, Islamic Studies lessons also include the teaching of:

  • Aqeedah; to understand the creed that makes up Islam. This is divided into 6 parts.
  • Belief in God -Allah, the One and Only One worthy of all worship
  • Belief in the Angels – Mala’ikah
  • Belief in the Books sent by Allah (including the Qurʾān). – Kutub
  • Belief in all the Messengers sent by Allah – Rasul
  • Belief in the Day of Judgment and in the Resurrection (life after death) – Qiyamah
  • Belief in Destiny/Fate – Qadar
  • Seerah; to learn about the lives of Prophets from Adam (A.S) to Muhammed (S.A.W)
  • Fiqh; with hadiths from the Hanafi School of thought in accordance with the four recognized schools of thought
  • Adab and Akhlaq; through the teaching of daily duas and manners in everyday life for them to be constant remembrance of their Lord

Lesson Structure

Islamic Studies lessons aim to cultivate a love for Allah and his messenger and to establish a solid foundational understanding of the principles, practices and beliefs of Islam. Students will gain an awareness of Islam’s integral relevance to their daily lives and how this shapes the way they interact with and view the world. The Islamic Studies department aims to use a hands-on approach using a range of media (books, videos, Ipads, interactive whiteboard) and activities to enhance students’ interest and understanding to consolidate their learning.

Scope and Sequence

Each term, there will be an emphasis on one topic from Reception to Year 6 (as outlined in the table below) with minor focuses alongside it; which will include lessons from seerah, fiqh, adab and akhlaq.

Islamic Studies Scope and Sequence from Reception to Year 6
Term 1 Term 2 Term 3 Term 4
Tawheed /Aqeedah and Salat Salat and Wudhu continued Sawm Hajj

Assessment

Assessment includes:

  • Participation in discussions, activities and classwork
  • Oral tests
  • Observation and anecdotal notes

Resources

Hassan L. & Ghazi. K. T.,Our Religion is Islam,1995, IQRA International Educational Foundation.

Saniyasnain. Quran Stories for little hearts , 2003,Goodword Kidz,

My Wudhu Book, My Prayer Book, My Dua Book; 2001, Darussalam Publishers.

Benchmarks & Recommendations

It is recommended that parents reinforce the Islamic values, morals and lessons taught at school and have discussions with their children to provide them with guidance. It is also advised that when performing Islamic duties in day to day living such as wudhu and salat, parents talk to their children about the actions they are performing and involve them too.

Year 1

Overview

At Garden College, Islamic Studies lessons primarily aim to allow students to develop a deep understanding of who their creator is and his divine attributes. In addition, Islamic Studies lessons also include the teaching of:

  • Aqeedah; to understand the creed that makes up Islam. This is divided into 6 parts.
  • Belief in God -Allah, the One and Only One worthy of all worship
  • Belief in the Angels – Mala’ikah
  • Belief in the Books sent by Allah (including the Qurʾān). – Kutub
  • Belief in all the Messengers sent by Allah – Rasul
  • Belief in the Day of Judgment and in the Resurrection (life after death) – Qiyamah
  • Belief in Destiny/Fate – Qadar
  • Seerah; to learn about the lives of Prophets from Adam (A.S) to Muhammed (S.A.W)
  • Fiqh; with hadiths from the Hanafi School of thought in accordance with the four recognized schools of thought
  • Adab and Akhlaq; through the teaching of daily duas and manners in everyday life for them to be constant remembrance of their Lord

Lesson Structure

Islamic Studies lessons aim to cultivate a love for Allah and his messenger and to establish a solid foundational understanding of the principles, practices and beliefs of Islam. Students will gain an awareness of Islam’s integral relevance to their daily lives and how this shapes the way they interact with and view the world. The Islamic Studies department aims to use a hands-on approach using a range of media (books, videos, Ipads, interactive whiteboard) and activities to enhance students’ interest and understanding to consolidate their learning.

Scope and Sequence

Each term, there will be an emphasis on one topic from Reception to Year 6 (as outlined in the table below) with minor focuses alongside it; which will include lessons from seerah, fiqh, adab and akhlaq.

Islamic Studies Scope and Sequence from Reception to Year 6
Term 1 Term 2 Term 3 Term 4
Tawheed /Aqeedah and Salat Salat and Wudhu continued Sawm Hajj

Assessment

Assessment includes:

  • Participation in discussions, activities and classwork
  • Oral tests
  • Observation and anecdotal notes

Resources

Hassan L. & Ghazi. K. T.,Our Religion is Islam,1995, IQRA International Educational Foundation.

Saniyasnain. Quran Stories for little hearts , 2003,Goodword Kidz,

My Wudhu Book, My Prayer Book, My Dua Book; 2001, Darussalam Publishers.

Benchmarks & Recommendations

It is recommended that parents reinforce the Islamic values, morals and lessons taught at school and have discussions with their children to provide them with guidance. It is also advised that when performing Islamic duties in day to day living such as wudhu and salat, parents talk to their children about the actions they are performing and involve them too.

Year 2

Overview

At Garden College, Islamic Studies lessons primarily aim to allow students to develop a deep understanding of who their creator is and his divine attributes. In addition, Islamic Studies lessons also include the teaching of:

  • Aqeedah; to understand the creed that makes up Islam. This is divided into 6 parts.
  • Belief in God -Allah, the One and Only One worthy of all worship
  • Belief in the Angels – Mala’ikah
  • Belief in the Books sent by Allah (including the Qurʾān). – Kutub
  • Belief in all the Messengers sent by Allah – Rasul
  • Belief in the Day of Judgment and in the Resurrection (life after death) – Qiyamah
  • Belief in Destiny/Fate – Qadar
  • Seerah; to learn about the lives of Prophets from Adam (A.S) to Muhammed (S.A.W)
  • Fiqh; with hadiths from the Hanafi School of thought in accordance with the four recognized schools of thought
  • Adab and Akhlaq; through the teaching of daily duas and manners in everyday life for them to be constant remembrance of their Lord

Lesson Structure

Islamic Studies lessons aim to cultivate a love for Allah and his messenger and to establish a solid foundational understanding of the principles, practices and beliefs of Islam. Students will gain an awareness of Islam’s integral relevance to their daily lives and how this shapes the way they interact with and view the world. The Islamic Studies department aims to use a hands-on approach using a range of media (books, videos, Ipads, interactive whiteboard) and activities to enhance students’ interest and understanding to consolidate their learning.

Scope and Sequence

Each term, there will be an emphasis on one topic from Reception to Year 6 (as outlined in the table below) with minor focuses alongside it; which will include lessons from seerah, fiqh, adab and akhlaq.

Islamic Studies Scope and Sequence from Reception to Year 6
Term 1 Term 2 Term 3 Term 4
Tawheed /Aqeedah and Salat Salat and Wudhu continued Sawm Hajj

Assessment

Assessment includes:

  • Participation in discussions, activities and classwork
  • Oral tests
  • Observation and anecdotal notes

Resources

Hassan L. & Ghazi. K. T.,Our Religion is Islam,1995, IQRA International Educational Foundation.

Saniyasnain. Quran Stories for little hearts , 2003,Goodword Kidz,

My Wudhu Book, My Prayer Book, My Dua Book; 2001, Darussalam Publishers.

Benchmarks & Recommendations

It is recommended that parents reinforce the Islamic values, morals and lessons taught at school and have discussions with their children to provide them with guidance. It is also advised that when performing Islamic duties in day to day living such as wudhu and salat, parents talk to their children about the actions they are performing and involve them too.

Year 3

Overview

At Garden College, Islamic Studies lessons primarily aim to allow students to develop a deep understanding of who their creator is and his divine attributes. In addition, Islamic Studies lessons also include the teaching of:

  • Aqeedah; to understand the creed that makes up Islam. This is divided into 6 parts.
  • Belief in God -Allah, the One and Only One worthy of all worship
  • Belief in the Angels – Mala’ikah
  • Belief in the Books sent by Allah (including the Qurʾān). – Kutub
  • Belief in all the Messengers sent by Allah – Rasul
  • Belief in the Day of Judgment and in the Resurrection (life after death) – Qiyamah
  • Belief in Destiny/Fate – Qadar
  • Seerah; to learn about the lives of Prophets from Adam (A.S) to Muhammed (S.A.W)
  • Fiqh; with hadiths from the Hanafi School of thought in accordance with the four recognized schools of thought
  • Adab and Akhlaq; through the teaching of daily duas and manners in everyday life for them to be constant remembrance of their Lord

Lesson Structure

Islamic Studies lessons aim to cultivate a love for Allah and his messenger and to establish a solid foundational understanding of the principles, practices and beliefs of Islam. Students will gain an awareness of Islam’s integral relevance to their daily lives and how this shapes the way they interact with and view the world. The Islamic Studies department aims to use a hands-on approach using a range of media (books, videos, Ipads, interactive whiteboard) and activities to enhance students’ interest and understanding to consolidate their learning.

Scope and Sequence

Each term, there will be an emphasis on one topic from Reception to Year 6 (as outlined in the table below) with minor focuses alongside it; which will include lessons from seerah, fiqh, adab and akhlaq.

 

Islamic Studies Scope and Sequence from Reception to Year 6
Term 1 Term 2 Term 3 Term 4
Tawheed /Aqeedah and Salat Salat and Wudhu continued Sawm Hajj

Assessment

Assessment includes:

  • Participation in discussions, activities and classwork
  • Oral tests
  • Observation and anecdotal notes

Resources

Hassan L. & Ghazi. K. T.,Our Religion is Islam,1995, IQRA International Educational Foundation.

Saniyasnain. Quran Stories for little hearts , 2003,Goodword Kidz,

My Wudhu Book, My Prayer Book, My Dua Book; 2001, Darussalam Publishers.

Benchmarks & Recommendations

It is recommended that parents reinforce the Islamic values, morals and lessons taught at school and have discussions with their children to provide them with guidance. It is also advised that when performing Islamic duties in day to day living such as wudhu and salat, parents talk to their children about the actions they are performing and involve them too.

Year 4

Overview

At Garden College, Islamic Studies lessons primarily aim to allow students to develop a deep understanding of who their creator is and his divine attributes. In addition, Islamic Studies lessons also include the teaching of:

  • Aqeedah; to understand the creed that makes up Islam. This is divided into 6 parts.
  • Belief in God -Allah, the One and Only One worthy of all worship
  • Belief in the Angels – Mala’ikah
  • Belief in the Books sent by Allah (including the Qurʾān). – Kutub
  • Belief in all the Messengers sent by Allah – Rasul
  • Belief in the Day of Judgment and in the Resurrection (life after death) – Qiyamah
  • Belief in Destiny/Fate – Qadar
  • Seerah; to learn about the lives of Prophets from Adam (A.S) to Muhammed (S.A.W)
  • Fiqh; with hadiths from the Hanafi School of thought in accordance with the four recognized schools of thought
  • Adab and Akhlaq; through the teaching of daily duas and manners in everyday life for them to be constant remembrance of their Lord

Lesson Structure

Islamic Studies lessons aim to cultivate a love for Allah and his messenger and to establish a solid foundational understanding of the principles, practices and beliefs of Islam. Students will gain an awareness of Islam’s integral relevance to their daily lives and how this shapes the way they interact with and view the world. The Islamic Studies department aims to use a hands-on approach using a range of media (books, videos, Ipads, interactive whiteboard) and activities to enhance students’ interest and understanding to consolidate their learning.

Scope and Sequence

Each term, there will be an emphasis on one topic from Reception to Year 6 (as outlined in the table below) with minor focuses alongside it; which will include lessons from seerah, fiqh, adab and akhlaq.

Islamic Studies Scope and Sequence from Reception to Year 6
Term 1 Term 2 Term 3 Term 4
Tawheed /Aqeedah and Salat Salat and Wudhu continued Sawm Hajj

Assessment

Assessment includes:

  • Participation in discussions, activities and classwork
  • Oral tests
  • Observation and anecdotal notes

Resources

Hassan L. & Ghazi. K. T.,Our Religion is Islam,1995, IQRA International Educational Foundation.

Saniyasnain. Quran Stories for little hearts , 2003,Goodword Kidz,

My Wudhu Book, My Prayer Book, My Dua Book; 2001, Darussalam Publishers.

Benchmarks & Recommendations

It is recommended that parents reinforce the Islamic values, morals and lessons taught at school and have discussions with their children to provide them with guidance. It is also advised that when performing Islamic duties in day to day living such as wudhu and salat, parents talk to their children about the actions they are performing and involve them too.

Year 5

Overview

At Garden College, Islamic Studies lessons primarily aim to allow students to develop a deep understanding of who their creator is and his divine attributes. In addition, Islamic Studies lessons also include the teaching of:

  • Aqeedah; to understand the creed that makes up Islam. This is divided into 6 parts.
  • Belief in God -Allah, the One and Only One worthy of all worship
  • Belief in the Angels – Mala’ikah
  • Belief in the Books sent by Allah (including the Qurʾān). – Kutub
  • Belief in all the Messengers sent by Allah – Rasul
  • Belief in the Day of Judgment and in the Resurrection (life after death) – Qiyamah
  • Belief in Destiny/Fate – Qadar
  • Seerah; to learn about the lives of Prophets from Adam (A.S) to Muhammed (S.A.W)
  • Fiqh; with hadiths from the Hanafi School of thought in accordance with the four recognized schools of thought
  • Adab and Akhlaq; through the teaching of daily duas and manners in everyday life for them to be constant remembrance of their Lord

Lesson Structure

Islamic Studies lessons aim to cultivate a love for Allah and his messenger and to establish a solid foundational understanding of the principles, practices and beliefs of Islam. Students will gain an awareness of Islam’s integral relevance to their daily lives and how this shapes the way they interact with and view the world. The Islamic Studies department aims to use a hands-on approach using a range of media (books, videos, Ipads, interactive whiteboard) and activities to enhance students’ interest and understanding to consolidate their learning.

Scope and Sequence

Each term, there will be an emphasis on one topic from Reception to Year 6 (as outlined in the table below) with minor focuses alongside it; which will include lessons from seerah, fiqh, adab and akhlaq.

Islamic Studies Scope and Sequence from Reception to Year 6
Term 1 Term 2 Term 3 Term 4
Tawheed /Aqeedah and Salat Salat and Wudhu continued Sawm Hajj

Assessment

Assessment includes:

  • Participation in discussions, activities and classwork
  • Oral tests
  • Observation and anecdotal notes

Resources

Hassan L. & Ghazi. K. T.,Our Religion is Islam,1995, IQRA International Educational Foundation.

Saniyasnain. Quran Stories for little hearts , 2003,Goodword Kidz,

My Wudhu Book, My Prayer Book, My Dua Book; 2001, Darussalam Publishers.

Benchmarks & Recommendations

It is recommended that parents reinforce the Islamic values, morals and lessons taught at school and have discussions with their children to provide them with guidance. It is also advised that when performing Islamic duties in day to day living such as wudhu and salat, parents talk to their children about the actions they are performing and involve them too.

Year 6

Overview

At Garden College, Islamic Studies lessons primarily aim to allow students to develop a deep understanding of who their creator is and his divine attributes. In addition, Islamic Studies lessons also include the teaching of:

  • Aqeedah; to understand the creed that makes up Islam. This is divided into 6 parts.
  • Belief in God -Allah, the One and Only One worthy of all worship
  • Belief in the Angels – Mala’ikah
  • Belief in the Books sent by Allah (including the Qurʾān). – Kutub
  • Belief in all the Messengers sent by Allah – Rasul
  • Belief in the Day of Judgment and in the Resurrection (life after death) – Qiyamah
  • Belief in Destiny/Fate – Qadar
  • Seerah; to learn about the lives of Prophets from Adam (A.S) to Muhammed (S.A.W)
  • Fiqh; with hadiths from the Hanafi School of thought in accordance with the four recognized schools of thought
  • Adab and Akhlaq; through the teaching of daily duas and manners in everyday life for them to be constant remembrance of their Lord

Lesson Structure

Islamic Studies lessons aim to cultivate a love for Allah and his messenger and to establish a solid foundational understanding of the principles, practices and beliefs of Islam. Students will gain an awareness of Islam’s integral relevance to their daily lives and how this shapes the way they interact with and view the world. The Islamic Studies department aims to use a hands-on approach using a range of media (books, videos, Ipads, interactive whiteboard) and activities to enhance students’ interest and understanding to consolidate their learning.

Scope and Sequence

Each term, there will be an emphasis on one topic from Reception to Year 6 (as outlined in the table below) with minor focuses alongside it; which will include lessons from seerah, fiqh, adab and akhlaq.

Islamic Studies Scope and Sequence from Reception to Year 6
Term 1 Term 2 Term 3 Term 4
Tawheed /Aqeedah and Salat Salat and Wudhu continued Sawm Hajj

Assessment

Assessment includes:

  • Participation in discussions, activities and classwork
  • Oral tests
  • Observation and anecdotal notes

Resources

Hassan L. & Ghazi. K. T.,Our Religion is Islam,1995, IQRA International Educational Foundation.

Saniyasnain. Quran Stories for little hearts , 2003,Goodword Kidz,

My Wudhu Book, My Prayer Book, My Dua Book; 2001, Darussalam Publishers.

Benchmarks & Recommendations

It is recommended that parents reinforce the Islamic values, morals and lessons taught at school and have discussions with their children to provide them with guidance. It is also advised that when performing Islamic duties in day to day living such as wudhu and salat, parents talk to their children about the actions they are performing and involve them too.

LOTE Arabic

Year-Reception (FOUNDATION)

Overview

Reception students are introduced to Arabic Letters and numbers from 1-10 early in the year. They are then taught how to pronounce and write each Arabic letter correctly and identify simple words beginning with the letter being learned in real life. Once this understanding is established, students are taught to form simple sentences using verbs that relate to the actions they carry out in real life.

Lesson Structure

Arabic lessons typically start with the Islamic greeting, oral interactions asking the students about their day and a revision of the Arabic alphabet rhyme. Students are then introduced to a new letter, taught how to pronounce it and write it correctly and then they practice what they have learned in their text books. Letters and words that are taught are constantly reiterated through rhymes that students can remember.

Scope and Sequence

The Arabic scope and sequence in the lower years lies in familiarizing students with the Arabic names of everyday objects and actions in their daily lives, in order to allow them to use these words in the correct context.

Reception Arabic scope and sequence
Term 1 Term 2 Term 3 Term 4
Fruits & vegetables Fruits & vegetables Numbers Farm animals

Assessment

In Arabic, students are assessed anecdotally whilst actively participating in activities and through their identification and pronunciation of the Arabic letters and their ability to write and use them independently.

Resources

Arabic Resources include:

  • Arabic in Kindergarten Textbook Level Pre-K2
  • Easyword Arabic Handwriting Book 1
  • Interactive White Board
  • Posters
  • Flashcards, Games and Hands on activities

Benchmarks and Recommendations

In Reception, the emphasis lies in students becoming confident with the Arabic alphabet and the numerals from 1 to 10 as well as identifying these in context. The support of parents by motivating students and assisting them with these goals is recommended. From Term 2, students in Prep begin to complete homework for Arabic, which attempts to reinforce letter recognition and simple words at home.

Year 1

Overview

Year 1 students are introduced to Arabic Letters and numbers from 1-20 early in the year. They are then reminded and taught how to pronounce and write each Arabic letter correctly and identify simple words beginning with the letter being focused on. Once this understanding is established, students are taught to form simple sentences using verbs that relate to the actions they carry out in real life.

Lesson Structure

Arabic lessons typically start with the Islamic greeting, oral interactions asking the students about their day and a revision of the Arabic alphabet rhyme. Students are then introduced to a new letter, taught how to pronounce it and write it correctly and then they practice what they have learned in their text books. Letters and words that are taught are constantly reiterated through rhymes that students can remember.

Scope and Sequence

The Arabic scope and sequence in the lower years lies in familiarizing students with the Arabic names of everyday objects and actions in their daily lives, in order to allow them to use these words in the correct context.

Year 1 Arabic scope and sequence
Term 1 Term 2 Term 3 Term 4
Body parts My family Colours & numbers Zoo animals

Assessment

In Arabic, students are assessed anecdotally whilst actively participating in activities and through their identification and pronunciation of the Arabic letters and their ability to write and use them independently.

Resources

Arabic Resources include:

  • Arabic in Kindergarten Textbook Level Pre-K3
  • Arabic in Kindergarten Workbook Level Pre-K3
  • Interactive White Board
  • Posters, Flashcards, Games and Hands on activities

Benchmarks and Recommendations

In Year1, the emphasis lies in students becoming confident with the Arabic alphabet and the numerals from 1 to 20 as well as identifying these in context. The support of parents by motivating students and assisting them with these goals is recommended. From Term 1, students in Year1 begin to complete homework for Arabic, which attempts to reinforce letter recognition and simple words at home.

Year 2

Overview

Year 2, students are expected to be able to form simple sentences to communicate purposefully about events like the weather. Early in the year, numbers from 1-20 are revised. Students are reminded and taught how to pronounce and write each Arabic letter correctly and identify simple words beginning with the letter being focused on. Once this understanding is established, students are encouraged to use more Arabic commands and sentences during class. They also learn about long vowel and short vowel sounds.

Lesson Structure

Arabic lessons typically start with Islamic greeting, oral discussions about students’ day, the day name and the weather, followed by quick revision of the previously learnt materials. Students then use textbook I Learn Arabic Multi Languages Textbook Level 1 for reading and I learn Arabic Multi Languages Workbook Level 1 for writing activities. Students are also given the opportunity to take home small short Arabic stories to read.

Scope and Sequence

The Arabic scope and sequence in the lower years lies in familiarizing students with the Arabic names of everyday objects and actions in their daily lives, in order to allow them to use these words in the correct context.

Year 2 Arabic scope and sequence
Term 1 Term 2 Term 3 Term 4
My home My family My School My friend

Assessment

In Arabic, students are assessed anecdotally whilst actively participating in activities and through their identification and pronunciation of the Arabic letters and their ability to write and use them independently.

Resources

Arabic Resources include:

  • I Learn Arabic Textbook Level 1
  • I Learn Arabic Workbook Level 1
  • Interactive White Board
  • Posters, Flashcards, Games and Hands on activities

Benchmarks and Recommendations

By the end of Grade 2, students learning Arabic are expected to be able to, identify and read words with correct pronunciation, form and spell familiar words correctly and show neat handwriting consistently.

Year 3

Overview

In Year 3, students will build on their previous knowledge of letters to differentiate between selfish letters and learn how to join them to make more complex words /sentence in Arabic. Students learn to describe the status of the weather in one or two words. Students are encouraged to use more Arabic commands and sentences during class. They continue to learn about long and short vowels, joining letters, forming simple sentences and using simple grammar in their oral language.

Lesson Structure

Arabic lessons typically start with Islamic greeting, oral discussions about students’ day, the day name and the weather, followed by quick revision of the previously learnt materials. Students then use textbook I Learn Arabic Multi Languages Textbook Level 1 for reading and I learn Arabic Multi Languages Workbook Level 2 for writing activities. Students are also given the opportunity to take home small short Arabic stories to read.

Scope and Sequence

The Arabic scope and sequence in the lower years lies in familiarizing students with the Arabic names of everyday objects and actions in their daily lives, in order to allow them to use these words in the correct context.

Year 3 Arabic scope and sequence
Term 1 Term 2 Term 3 Term 4
Healthy Food Body Parts Daily Routine Identity

Assessment

In Arabic, students are assessed anecdotally whilst actively participating in activities and through their identification and pronunciation of the Arabic letters and their ability to write and use them independently.

Resources

Arabic Resources include:

  • Arabic in Kindergarten Textbook Level Pre-K2
  • Easyword Arabic Handwriting Book 1
  • Interactive White Board
  • Posters, Flashcards, Games and Hands on activities

Benchmarks and Recommendations

By the end of Year 3, students learning Arabic are expected to be able to, identify and read words with correct pronunciation, form joint words and letters and spell familiar words correctly and show neat handwriting consistently. Year 3 students are also given the opportunity to engage with students from suburban schools learning Arabic, through the inter-school competitions and visits.

Year 4

Overview

In Year 4, students build on their previous knowledge and there is an emphasis on forming more complex words /sentences in Arabic. Students describe the status of the weather using complex sentences.Grade4 students are encouraged to use more Arabic commands and sentences during class. They continue building their knowledge about long and short vowel sounds, joining the letters, forming simple and more complex sentences and using the correct grammar. They also begin to work on Projects.

Lesson Structure

Arabic lessons typically start with Islamic greeting, oral discussions about students’ day, the day name and the weather, followed by quick revision of the previously learnt materials. Students then use the Iqra Arabic Reader Textbook Level 2 for reading and workbook activities. Students are also given the opportunity to take home small short Arabic stories to read.

Scope and Sequence

The Arabic scope and sequence in the upper years lies in developing proficiency when forming simple and complex sentences relating to everyday experiences, in order to allow them to communicate more effectively.

Year 4 Arabic scope and sequence
Term 1 Term 2 Term 3 Term 4
Seasons Weather Transport Sport

Assessment

In Arabic, students are assessed anecdotally whilst actively participating in activities and through their identification and pronunciation of the Arabic letters and their ability to write and use them independently.

Resources

Arabic Resources include:

  • Iqra Arabic Reader Textbook Level 2
  • Iqra Arabic Reader Workbook Level 2
  • Interactive White Board
  • Posters, Flashcards, Games and Hands on activities

Benchmarks and Recommendations

By the end of Year 4, students learning Arabic are expected to be able to, identify and read words with correct pronunciation, form joint words and letters and spell familiar words correctly and show neat handwriting consistently. Year 4 students are also expected to be able to communicate projects by forming simple and some complex sentences.

Year 5

Overview

In Year 5, students build on their previous knowledge and there is an emphasis on forming more complex sentences in Arabic. Students describe the status of the weather using longer sentences. Year 5 students are encouraged to use more Arabic commands and sentences during class. They continue building their knowledge about long and short vowel sounds, joining the letters, forming simple and more complex sentences and using the correct grammar. Year 5 students are also taught how to write short paragraphs/stories in Arabic.

Lesson Structure

Arabic lessons typically start with the Islamic greeting, oral discussions about students’ day, the day name and the weather, followed by quick revision. Students use textbook I Learn Arabic Multi Languages Textbook Level 3, as well as an Arabic dictionary to broaden their vocabulary using the Al-Maurid Dictionary.

Scope and Sequence

The Arabic scope and sequence in the upper years lies in developing proficiency when forming simple and complex sentences relating to everyday experiences, in order to allow them to communicate more effectively.

Year 5 Arabic scope and sequence
Term 1 Term 2 Term 3 Term 4
Islamic Manners Cleanliness Role Models My Parents

Assessment

In Arabic, students are assessed anecdotally whilst actively participating in activities and through their identification and pronunciation of the Arabic letters and their ability to write and use them independently.

Resources

Arabic Resources include:

  • I Learn Arabic Multi Languages Textbook Level 3
  • Al-Maurid Dictionary
  • Interactive White Board
  • Posters, Flashcards, Games and Hands on activities

Benchmarks and Recommendations

By the end of Year 5, students learning Arabic are expected to be able to, read simple sentences with correct pronunciation, form sentences independently and show neat handwriting consistently. Year 5 students are also expected to be able to communicate projects using detailed sentences.

Year 6

Overview

In Year 6, students build on their previous knowledge and there is an emphasis on forming more complex sentences in Arabic. Students describe the status of the weather using longer sentences. Year 6 students are encouraged to use more Arabic commands and sentences during class. They continue building their knowledge about long and short vowel sounds, joining the letters, forming simple and more complex sentences and using the correct grammar. Year 6 students are also taught how to write short paragraphs/stories in Arabic.

Lesson Structure

Arabic lessons typically start with Islamic greeting, oral discussions about students’ day, the day name and the weather, followed by quick revision of the previously learnt materials. Students use the textbook ‘I love and Learn the Arabic Language Textbook Level 4’, as well as an Arabic dictionary to broaden their vocabulary (Al-Maurid Dictionary).

Scope and Sequence

The Arabic scope and sequence in the upper years lies in developing proficiency when forming simple and complex sentences relating to everyday experiences, in order to allow them to communicate more effectively.

Year 6 Arabic scope and sequence
Term 1 Term 2 Term 3 Term 4
Islamic Manners Friendship Hobbies Occupation

Assessment

In Arabic, students are assessed anecdotally whilst actively participating in activities and through their identification and pronunciation of the Arabic letters and their ability to write and use them independently.

Resources

Arabic Resources include:

  • I love and Learn the Arabic Language Textbook Level 4
  • Al-Maurid Dictionary
  • Interactive White Board
  • Posters, Flashcards, Games and Hands on activities

Benchmarks and Recommendations

By the end of Year 6, students learning Arabic are expected to be able to, read simple sentences with correct pronunciation, form sentences independently and show neat handwriting consistently. Year 6 students are also expected to be able to communicate projects using detailed sentences and write short recounts.

LOTE Turkish

LOTE Turkish

Language is an integral part of our identity and language is the expression of our unique relationship with the land and the cultural practices that have been handed on down the generations for thousands and thousands of years. At Garden College, Turkish is taught to students with an attempt to bridge the gap between their Australian and Turkish identities. Students are taught Turkish whilst developing an understanding of Turkish tradition, culture and society.

Reception

Overview

At Garden College, the Turkish LOTE staff aims to offer students the opportunity to effectively communicate with members of other cultures in a worldwide society through an increased knowledge and understanding of the Turkish language and culture.

Lesson Structure

Reception students have 2 periods of LOTE – Turkish per week. During Turkish lessons, students hear words, phrases and basic sentences in context. Students are introduced to formal Turkish with repetitive patterns and they develop strategies for memorisation and comprehension, which are modelled and practiced with them. Students also begin to interpret gestures and facial expressions and use some of these non-verbal cues as an important part of the Turkish.

Students start to understand and use Turkish in structured situations and activities related to their life: myself, family and school. To develop comprehension, they respond non-verbally or by using key words or short phrases. They begin to use sets of words and sentences that are encountered frequently in the classroom, and begin to insert words into simple sentences. Students learn to recognise the printed form of familiar words that they have learned and memorised.

Scope and Sequence

As a part of the academic year, the activities that are organised by the LOTE Turkish department include:

  • ANZAC Commemorations
  • Multicultural Day (LOTE week)
  • Poetry Competition
  • Multicultural Children’s Festival
  • Story time
  • Writing Competition
Year Reception Turkish scope and sequence
Term 1 Term 2 Term 3 Term 4
My Self & My School Turkish Alphabet & Colours Turkish Numbers,Fruit & Vegetables Animals &Turkish Vowels

Assessment

In Turkish, students are assessed anecdotally whilst actively participating in activities. Students are also tested on their identification and pronunciation of Turkish letters and their ability to write and use them independently. Evidence of student learning is collated during and through:

  • Anecdotal notes
  • Observation of students writing and formation of letters and drawings.
  • Class participation
  • Homework

Resources

Students at Garden College are taught Turkish using the Gokkusagi series of Textbooks to complement and reinforce what is demonstrated and modelled in class. Other resources used include:

  • Interactive board
  • Work sheets
  • White Board
  • Posters
  • Flashcard
  • Story books
  • Educational games

Benchmarks and Recommendations

Students will be expected to complete Turkish homework which will attempt to allow them to recognise the “different” or “difference between” sounds of similar letters, and demonstrate differences for key sounds. Students will be given simple tasks such as identifying letter-sound relationships and copying and tracing letters and letter clusters whilst matching them to sounds and words. It is expected that parents assist and ensure that students complete their homework.

Year 1

Overview

At Garden College, the Turkish LOTE department aims to offer students the opportunity to effectively communicate with members of other cultures in a worldwide society through an increased knowledge and understanding of the Turkish language and culture.

Lesson Structure

Reception students have 2 periods and Year 1 – 6 students have 3 periods of LOTE – Turkish per week. During Turkish lessons, students hear words, phrases and basic sentences in context. Students are introduced to formal Turkish with repetitive patterns and they develop strategies for memorisation and comprehension, which are modelled and practiced with them. Students also begin to interpret gestures and facial expressions and use some of these non-verbal cues as an important part of the Turkish.

Scope and Sequence

As a part of the academic year, the activities that are organised by the LOTE Turkish department include:

  • ANZAC Commemorations
  • Multicultural Day (LOTE week)
  • Poetry and Writing Competition
  • Multicultural Children’s Festival
  • Story time
Year 1Turkish scope and sequence
Term 1 Term 2 Term 3 Term 4
My Family & My Body Body Parts Colours & Numbers Zoo Animals

Assessment

In Turkish, students are assessed anecdotally whilst actively participating in activities. Students are also tested on their identification and pronunciation of Turkish letters and their ability to write and use them independently. Evidence of student learning is collated during and through:

  • Anecdotal notes
  • Observation of students writing and formation of letters and drawings.
  • Class participation
  • Homework

Resources

Students at Garden College are taught Turkish using the Gokkusagi series of Textbooks to complement and reinforce what is demonstrated and modelled in class. Other resources used include:

  • Interactive board
  • Work sheets
  • White Board
  • Posters
  • Flashcard
  • Story books
  • Educational games

Benchmarks and Recommendations

Students will be expected to complete Turkish homework which will attempt to allow them to recognise the “different” or “difference between” sounds of similar letters, and demonstrate differences for key sounds. Students will be given simple tasks such as identifying letter-sound relationships and copying and tracing letters and letter clusters whilst matching them to sounds and words. It is expected that parents assist and ensure that students complete their homework.

Year 2

Overview

At Garden College, the Turkish LOTE department aims to offer students the opportunity to effectively communicate with members of other cultures in a worldwide society through an increased knowledge and understanding of the Turkish language and culture.

Lesson Structure

Reception students have 2 periods and Year 1 – 6 students have 3 periods of LOTE – Turkish per week. During Turkish lessons, students hear words, phrases and basic sentences in context. Students are introduced to formal Turkish with repetitive patterns and they develop strategies for memorisation and comprehension, which are modelled and practiced with them. Students also begin to interpret gestures and facial expressions and use some of these non-verbal cues as an important part of the Turkish.

Scope and Sequence

As a part of the academic year, the activities that are organised by the LOTE Turkish department include:

  • ANZAC Commemorations
  • Multicultural Day (LOTE week)
  • Poetry Competition
  • Multicultural Children’s Festival
  • Story time
  • Writing Competition
Year 2 Turkish scope and sequence
Term 1 Term 2 Term 3 Term 4
My home My family My school My friend

Assessment

In Turkish, students are assessed anecdotally whilst actively participating in activities. Students are also tested on their identification and pronunciation of Turkish letters and their ability to write and use them independently. Evidence of student learning is collated during and through:

  • Anecdotal notes
  • Observation of students writing and formation of letters and drawings.
  • Class participation
  • Homework

Resources

Students at Garden College are taught Turkish using the Gokkusagi series of Textbooks to complement and reinforce what is demonstrated and modelled in class. Other resources used include:

  • Interactive board
  • Work sheets
  • White Board
  • Posters
  • Flashcard
  • Story books
  • Educational games

Benchmarks and Recommendations

Students will be expected to complete Turkish homework which will attempt to allow them to recognise the “different” or “difference between” sounds of similar letters, and demonstrate differences for key sounds. Students will be given simple tasks such as identifying letter-sound relationships and copying and tracing letters and letter clusters whilst matching them to sounds and words. It is expected that parents assist and ensure that students complete their homework.

Year 3

Overview

At Garden College, the Turkish LOTE department aims to offer students the opportunity to effectively communicate with members of other cultures in a worldwide society through an increased knowledge and understanding of the Turkish language and culture.

Lesson Structure

Reception students have 2 periods and Year 1 – 6 students have 3 periods of LOTE – Turkish per week. During Turkish lessons, students hear words, phrases and basic sentences in context. Students are introduced to formal Turkish with repetitive patterns and they develop strategies for memorisation and comprehension, which are modelled and practiced with them. Students also begin to interpret gestures and facial expressions and use some of these non-verbal cues as an important part of the Turkish.

Scope and Sequence

As a part of the academic year, the activities that are organised by the LOTE Turkish department include:

  • ANZAC Commemorations
  • Multicultural Day (LOTE week)
  • Poetry and Writing Competition
  • Multicultural Children’s Festival
  • Story time
Year 3 Turkish scope and sequence
Term 1 Term 2 Term 3 Term 4
Healthy food Body parts Daily routine Identity(Show and tell)

Assessment

In Turkish, students are assessed anecdotally whilst actively participating in activities. Students are also tested on their identification and pronunciation of Turkish letters and their ability to write and use them independently. Evidence of student learning is collated during and through:

  • Anecdotal notes
  • Observation of students writing and formation of letters and drawings.
  • Class participation
  • Homework

Resources

Students at Garden College are taught Turkish using the Gokkusagi series of Textbooks to complement and reinforce what is demonstrated and modelled in class. Other resources used include:

  • Interactive board
  • Work sheets
  • White Board
  • Posters
  • Flashcard
  • Story books
  • Educational games

Benchmarks and Recommendations

Students will be expected to complete Turkish homework which will attempt to allow them to recognise the “different” or “difference between” sounds of similar letters, and demonstrate differences for key sounds. Students will be given simple tasks such as identifying letter-sound relationships and copying and tracing letters and letter clusters whilst matching them to sounds and words. It is expected that parents assist and ensure that students complete their homework.

Year 4

Overview

At Garden College, the Turkish LOTE department aims to offer students the opportunity to effectively communicate with members of other cultures in a worldwide society through an increased knowledge and understanding of the Turkish language and culture.

Lesson Structure

Reception students have 2 periods and Year 1 – 6 students have 3 periods of LOTE – Turkish per week. During Turkish lessons, students hear words, phrases and basic sentences in context. Students are introduced to formal Turkish with repetitive patterns and they develop strategies for memorisation and comprehension, which are modelled and practiced with them. Students also begin to interpret gestures and facial expressions and use some of these non-verbal cues as an important part of the Turkish.

Scope and Sequence

As a part of the academic year, the activities that are organised by the LOTE Turkish department include:

  • ANZAC Commemorations
  • Multicultural Day (LOTE week)
  • Poetry Competition
  • Multicultural Children’s Festival
  • Story time
  • Writing Competition
Year 4 Turkish scope and sequence
Term 1 Term 2 Term 3 Term 4
Seasons Weather Transports Sports

Assessment

In Turkish, students are assessed anecdotally whilst actively participating in activities. Students are also tested on their identification and pronunciation of Turkish letters and their ability to write and use them independently. Evidence of student learning is collated during and through:

  • Anecdotal notes
  • Observation of students writing and formation of letters and drawings.
  • Class participation
  • Homework

Resources

Students at Garden College are taught Turkish using the Gokkusagi series of Textbooks to complement and reinforce what is demonstrated and modelled in class. Other resources used include:

  • Interactive board
  • Work sheets
  • White Board
  • Posters
  • Flashcard
  • Story books
  • Educational games

Benchmarks and Recommendations

Students will be expected to complete Turkish homework which will attempt to allow them to recognise the “different” or “difference between” sounds of similar letters, and demonstrate differences for key sounds. Students will be given simple tasks such as identifying letter-sound relationships and copying and tracing letters and letter clusters whilst matching them to sounds and words. It is expected that parents assist and ensure that students complete their homework.

Year 5

Overview

At Garden College, the Turkish LOTE department aims to offer students the opportunity to effectively communicate with members of other cultures in a worldwide society through an increased knowledge and understanding of the Turkish language and culture.

Lesson Structure

Reception students have 2 periods and Year 1 – 6 students have 3 periods of LOTE – Turkish per week. During Turkish lessons, students hear words, phrases and basic sentences in context. Students are introduced to formal Turkish with repetitive patterns and they develop strategies for memorisation and comprehension, which are modelled and practiced with them. Students also begin to interpret gestures and facial expressions and use some of these non-verbal cues as an important part of the Turkish.

Scope and Sequence

As a part of the academic year, the activities that are organised by the LOTE Turkish department include:

  • ANZAC Commemorations
  • Multicultural Day (LOTE week)
  • Poetry Competition
  • Multicultural Children’s Festival
  • Story time
  • Writing Competition
Year 5 Turkish scope and sequence
Term 1 Term 2 Term 3 Term 4
Islamic Manners Cleanliness Role Models My Parents

Assessment

In Turkish, students are assessed anecdotally whilst actively participating in activities. Students are also tested on their identification and pronunciation of Turkish letters and their ability to write and use them independently. Evidence of student learning is collated during and through:

  • Anecdotal notes
  • Observation of students writing and formation of letters and drawings.
  • Class participation
  • Homework

Resources

Students at Garden College are taught Turkish using the Gokkusagi series of Textbooks to complement and reinforce what is demonstrated and modelled in class. Other resources used include:

  • Interactive board
  • Work sheets
  • White Board
  • Posters
  • Flashcard
  • Story books
  • Educational games

Benchmarks and Recommendations

Students will be expected to complete Turkish homework which will attempt to allow them to recognise the “different” or “difference between” sounds of similar letters, and demonstrate differences for key sounds. Students will be given simple tasks such as identifying letter-sound relationships and copying and tracing letters and letter clusters whilst matching them to sounds and words. It is expected that parents assist and ensure that students complete their homework.

Year 6

Overview

At Garden College, the Turkish LOTE department aims to offer students the opportunity to effectively communicate with members of other cultures in a worldwide society through an increased knowledge and understanding of the Turkish language and culture.

Lesson Structure

Reception students have 2 periods and Year 1 – 6 students have 3 periods of LOTE – Turkish per week. During Turkish lessons, students hear words, phrases and basic sentences in context. Students are introduced to formal Turkish with repetitive patterns and they develop strategies for memorisation and comprehension, which are modelled and practiced with them.

Scope and Sequence

As a part of the academic year, the activities that are organised by the LOTE Turkish department include:

  • ANZAC Commemorations
  • Multicultural Day (LOTE week)
  • Poetry& Writing Competition
  • Story time
Year 6 Turkish scope and sequence
Term 1 Term 2 Term 3 Term 4
Islamic manners Friendship Hobbies Occupation

Assessment

In Turkish, students are assessed anecdotally whilst actively participating in activities. Students are also tested on their identification and pronunciation of Turkish letters and their ability to write and use them independently. Evidence of student learning is collated during and through:

  • Anecdotal notes
  • Observation of students writing and formation of letters and drawings.
  • Class participation
  • Homework

Resources

Students at Garden College are taught Turkish using the Gokkusagi series of Textbooks to complement and reinforce what is demonstrated and modelled in class. Other resources used include:

  • Interactive board
  • Work sheets
  • White Board
  • Posters
  • Flashcard
  • Story books
  • Educational games

Benchmarks and Recommendations

Students will be expected to complete Turkish homework which will attempt to allow them to recognise the “different” or “difference between” sounds of similar letters, and demonstrate differences for key sounds. Students will be given simple tasks such as identifying letter-sound relationships and copying and tracing letters and letter clusters whilst matching them to sounds and words. It is expected that parents assist and ensure that students complete their homework.